Warp, Weft, and Way

Chinese and Comparative Philosophy 中國哲學與比較哲學

Fudan English-Language Chinese Philosophy Programs

Here is information about the English-language programs in Chinese philosophy offered at Fudan University. We have had some discussion of them here before. and the feedback we’ve gathered has been consistently positive. I had an opportunity to give a lecture to some of the students in this program a year or so ago, and was impressed with the students! The application deadline and other information is below.

Continue reading “Fudan English-Language Chinese Philosophy Programs”

December 21, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Programs of Study | no comments

SACP Panels at the Upcoming APA East Meeting

The Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy will host two panels at the upcoming APA conference in Philadelphia.  If you are going to the conference be sure not to miss these two panels of outstanding scholars.

December 27th, 6:30 – 9:30 p.m.
Panel GI-5
Topic: Philosophy of Language in Early China
Chair: Susan Blake
Speakers:
Jane Geaney (University of Richmond): “A Language Crisis? Early Chinese Metalinguistic Terms from a Comparative Perspective”
Dan Robins (University of Hong Kong): “Later Mohist Nominalism”
Susan Blake (Indiana University): “Disputation and Names in the Zhuangzi”
Stephen Walker (University of Chicago): “Systematically Misleading Expressions in Zhuangzi 25”

 

December 29th, 1:30 – 4:30 p.m.
Panel GIX-3
Topic: Comparative Perspectives in East Asian Philosophy
Chair: James McRae
Speakers:
Ai Yuan (University of Oxford): “Embracing the Unavoidable: Zhiming (知命) in Mencius and Zhuangzi”
Brad Cokelet (University of Miami): “Spontaneous Agency and Neo-Kantian Constitutivism”
Paul D’Ambrosio (East China Normal University): “Justice vs. Harmony: Li Zehou’s Historical Approach to Global Ethics”
Hwa Yeong Wang (Binghamton University): “A Feminist Reconstruction of Emotions in Korean Neo-Confucianism”
James McRae (Westminster College): “From Kyōsei to Kyōei: Symbiotic Flourishing in Japanese Environmental Ethics”

December 20, 2014 Posted by | American Philosophical Association, Conference | no comments

New articles on Democracy and on Confucianism

Two new articles in the latest China: An International Journal may be of interest, one on “Chinese democracy” and one on “Confucianism” and Chinese labor activism.

Continue reading “New articles on Democracy and on Confucianism”

December 20, 2014 Posted by | China, Comparative philosophy, Comparative Political Theory, Confucianism, Contemporary Confucianism, Democracy | no comments

More new content at SEP

The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy has added some great new content related to Chinese philosophy, some of it discussed here. The latest is a new article on the Zhuangzi by Chad Hansen. (One of these days I hope I will finish my own article on “Chinese Social and Political Philosophy”….) Congratulations, Chad.

December 20, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Daoism, Zhuangzi | 2 comments

NYT on Ted Slingerland’s Trying Not To Try

A nice article on Ted Slingerland’s recent book!

December 20, 2014 Posted by | Books of Interest, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy | one comment

Two New Books

Two valuable new works:

Congratulations to both authors!

December 20, 2014 Posted by | Books of Interest, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Contemporary Confucianism | no comments

New book: Worlding Multiculturalisms

Worlding Multiculturalisms: The Politics of Inter-Asian Dwelling (edited by Daniel Goh) in the Routledge Series of Political Theories in East Asian Context has just published. Please find the website below in case you are interested.
http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9781138781177/
Worlding multiculturalisms are practices that infuse our arbitrary cultural lives with new things from other cultures in poetic ways to enable us to dwell and be at home with the complexity of the world. In the context of the crisis of multiculturalism in the West and the growing obsolescence of state-based multiculturalism in the postcolonial world, this book offers examples of new practices of worlding multiculturalisms that go beyond issues of immigration, integration and identity. Contrasting Western and Asian notions of
multiculturalism, this book does not focus on state issues, but rather, highlights manifestations of cultural exchange.

December 16, 2014 Posted by | Books of Interest, Comparative philosophy | one comment

New book on Confucian revival

A promising-looking new collection of essays on the multi-faceted revival of Confucianism in contemporary China, to be released in February by SUNY Press:

The Sage Returns: Confucian Revival in Contemporary China

Summary

Until its rejection by reformers and revolutionaries in the twentieth century, Confucianism had been central to Chinese culture, identity, and thought for centuries. Confucianism was rejected by both Nationalists under Chiang Kai-shek and Mao Zedong’s Communist Party, which characterized it as an ideology of reaction and repression. Yet the sage has returned: today, Chinese people from all walks of life and every level of authority are embracing Confucianism. As China turned away from the excesses of the Cultural Revolution and experienced the adoption and challenges of market practices, alternatives were sought to the prevailing socialist morality. Beginning in the 1980s and continuing through the years, ideas, images, behaviors, and attitudes associated with Confucianism have come back into public and private life. In this volume, scholars from a wide range of disciplines explore the contemporary Confucian revival in China, looking at Confucianism and the state, intellectual life, and popular culture. Contributors note how the revival of Confucianism plays out in a variety of ways, from China’s relationship with the rest of the world, to views of capitalism and science, to blockbuster movies and teenage fashion.

Continue reading “New book on Confucian revival”

December 13, 2014 Posted by | Books of Interest, China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Confucianism, Contemporary Confucianism | 2 comments

Conference on De 德 (Virtue) and Mei 美 (Beauty)

International Conference on De德 (Virtue) and Mei 美 (Beauty) in Chinese Philosophy

国际学术研讨会(2015, 3月25-27)

In order to promote a deeper understanding of philosophy and culture among civilizations and encourage further professional and cultural exchanges between China and Europe we will hold the conference on virtues and beauty in Venice, Italy, March 25-27, 2015.

为了加深对世界文明的理解和推动中国与欧洲的学术交流,我们将2015年3月25-27在意大利威尼斯大学共同举办首届国际中国德性与美学术研讨会。

Continue reading “Conference on De 德 (Virtue) and Mei 美 (Beauty)”

December 10, 2014 Posted by | Aesthetics, Call for Papers (CFP), Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Conference | no comments

Korean Philosophy Conference

You may have noticed this information in my recent post about the NAKPA, but in case you didn’t, here is the official poster for the Korean and Comparative Philosophy and History of Philosophy conference that will be held at City University of Hong Kong, Dec. 12-13, 2014.

December 10, 2014 Posted by | Comparative philosophy, Conference, Confucianism, Korea, Korean Philosophy, Neo-Confucianism | no comments

AAS Small Grants Program

For current AAS members, the China and Inner Asia Small Grant Program may be of interest:

Continue reading “AAS Small Grants Program”

December 8, 2014 Posted by | Opportunities | no comments

Review of Crane, Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Dao

Here is another in our occasional series of book reviews. Thanks to Mat for doing this, and comments are, of course, welcome!

Mathew A. Foust       Central Connecticut State University

Review of Sam Crane, Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Dao: Ancient Chinese Thought in Modern American Life (UK: Wiley Blackwell, 2013), xi + 201 pp.

Sam Crane intends this volume for “people who have an interest in seeing how ancient Chinese thought might cast new light on the present day but who are not yet familiar with the time-honored works” (3), with the belief that Chinese thought can “show us something about our world and ourselves that we might otherwise not see” (10). More specifically, Crane applies concepts and theories from Confucianism and Daoism to several contemporary issues dotting the American landscape. After a chapter explaining key concepts of Confucianism and Daoism, Crane explores how these teachings might be brought to bear on debates arising in virtually every sphere of human life, from birth (e.g., the issue of abortion) to death (e.g., the issue of euthanasia). Although his arguments are occasionally strained by inadequate textual support, his volume is largely able to achieve its stated objectives.

Continue reading “Review of Crane, Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Dao”

December 8, 2014 Posted by | Book Review, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Comparative Political Theory, Confucianism, Confucius, Contemporary Confucianism | no comments

NAKPA Newsletter

Many readers will be interested in the doings of the North American Korean Philosophy Association (NAKPA), the newsletter of which follows. 


The NAKPA COURIER

A Quarterly E-Newsletter of the North American Korean Philosophy Association
No. 4, December, 2014

 

Season’s Greetings from the Desktop Editor

Dear Friends and Colleagues,

Greetings once again from Omaha, Nebraska, US! I hope this letter finds you and all your loved ones well. First of all, we have just launched our Facebook page “North American Korean Philosophical Association” so please visit and “like” us. (I am indebted to Joe Bolling for this project).

In this issue of the NAKPA Courier, you are able to find the full program of the conference Korean and Comparative Philosophy and History of Philosophy that will be held at City University of Hong Kong, Dec. 12-13, 2014. In addition, the full program of the two sessions on Korean philosophy at the upcoming Eastern APA (American Philosophical Associations) in Philadelphia in December 2014, the session at the Central APA (St. Louis) in February 2015 and also one at the Pacific APA (Seattle) in April 2015 can be found. The first will be focused on the Korean traditional philosophy in general, the second one on the Korean Studies on the Book of Changes, and the last one on the Korean political philosophy. (For details, see the section below.)  I am also pleased to let you know that “The Spirit of Korean Philosophy: Six Debates and Their Significance,” an international conference recently held in Omaha under the auspice of University of Nebraska at Omaha as well as the Academy of Korean Studies and NAKPA, went very well.

Continue reading “NAKPA Newsletter”

December 8, 2014 Posted by | American Philosophical Association, Comparative philosophy, Korea, Korean Philosophy, Organization News | no comments

Explaining Daoism with help from RZA

Here.

December 4, 2014 Posted by | Daodejing, Daoism, Popular Culture | 3 comments

Midwest Conference in Chinese Thought Call for Papers announced

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

11th Annual Midwest Conference on Chinese Thought

North Central College, Naperville, IL

May 1-2, 2015

 

The Midwest Conference on Chinese Thought was created to foster dialogue and interaction between scholars and students working on Chinese thought across different disciplines and through a variety of approaches. Submissions are invited for papers on any aspect of Chinese thought, as well as papers dealing with comparative issues that engage Chinese perspectives.

This year’s conference will be held on Friday, May 1 and Saturday, May 2 at North Central College in Naperville, IL (30 miles west of Chicago). Our keynote speaker will be Donald Harper, Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, University of Chicago. Dr. Harper will discuss the three groups of ancient Laozi manuscripts—the bamboo-slip manuscripts from Guodian, the silk manuscripts from Mawangdui, and the looted bamboo-slip manuscripts acquired by Peking University—from the perspective of current manuscript culture studies and the New Philology in European and Anglo-American textual studies. All three groups of manuscripts predate the first century BCE imperial editorial project which was a defining moment in the formation of the ancient intellectual texts that survive today in printed editions. Ranging in date between 300 and 100 BCE, the three groups of Laozi manuscripts permit us to consider the earlier formation and circulation of the Laozi based on actual manuscripts, and can be the basis for a reassessment of the “original” Laozi.

Please submit a 1-page abstract to Brian Hoffert at bhoffert@noctrl.edu by January 31, 2015 for blind review. For more information about the conference, go to www.indiana.edu/~mcct/home.php or contact Brian Hoffert at bhoffert@noctrl.edu.

December 4, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | no comments

Academic Book Costs

Given the energetic interest (e.g. here, recently) in academic book prices that are clearly pitched to institutional library collections and not for the average disposable income of individuals, I thought perhaps we could discuss this in a separate post and if we’re lucky, some of the blog readers who are in the publishing end could weigh in. At the very least, it might provide a forum in which to find out what goes into the decision to print a hardcover, library volume exclusively — I suppose something more illuminating than “there isn’t a market big enough for a softcover printing” would be nice. Comments from all sides are welcome.

Please keep comments civil — I know there is frustration out there but it may be constructive not to rage against the machine in this context.

December 3, 2014 Posted by | Academia, Book Prices, Publishing | 26 comments

New Blog on Being an Asian in Philosophy

Readers may be interested in this new blog:

This blog contains narratives of personal experiences, submitted by readers, of life in philosophy as a person of color. Some of these stories will undoubtedly be accounts of racial bias, whether explicit, unconscious, or institutional. However, other posts will be accounts of progress being undertaken or achieved.

This is a project of several philosophers of all colors, moderated by a group of philosophy faculty from a variety of institutions. It is partly inspired by the thoughtful conversations that grew up around the blog What is it Like to be a Woman in Philosophy.

We invite everyone to contribute. Many posts will be written by people of color in philosophy. But we hope that not all will be.

We plan to post a new story every day or as they are submitted. Please click on the ‘Send a Story’ link to submit a story anonymously.

December 2, 2014 Posted by | Academia, Profession | no comments

ToC: Dao 13:4

The latest issue of Tao has been published.

Continue reading “ToC: Dao 13:4″

December 2, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Japanese philosophy, Tables of Contents | no comments

New Frontiers of Philosophy in China published

Frontiers of Philosophy in China 9:3 has been published, and is available on-line. Among other things, there are reviews of:

  • Brook Ziporyn, Ironies of Oneness and Difference: Coherence in Early Chinese Thought; Prolegomena to the Study of Li 理. (By Steve Coutinho)
  • Stephen C. Angle, Contemporary Confucian Political Philosophy: Toward Progressive Confucianism. (By WANG Kun)
  • Erica Fox Brindley, Music, Cosmology, and the Politics of Harmony in Early China. (By Heinrich Geiger)

In case some readers do not have access to this journal, I will add here some snippets from these three reviews.

Continue reading “New Frontiers of Philosophy in China published”

December 1, 2014 Posted by | Book Review, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Comparative Political Theory, Contemporary Confucianism | no comments

Reading the Old in the Light of the Newly Discovered: Chinese Philosophy and Ancient Chinese Texts

Macquarie University, Sydney, will be the first in Australia to host an international conference on ancient Chinese thought and the newly recovered ancient bamboo and silk texts, from 8th to 10th December 2014.

Organized by Chinese Studies of the Department of International Studies (Languages and Cultures), Faculty of Arts, the symposium will focus on the latest research of international importance: traditional Chinese thought in the newly recovered ancient texts.

Dates and Venues:

Day 1 – Monday 8th December
Opening Ceremony – 9:30 for 10:00am – 11:00am, Macquarie University Art Gallery, Building E11A
RSVP: dsklee@bigpond.net.au. Limited seats are available.
Conference begins 11:30am – 5:15pm, C5C T1 Theatre (Open to all, free admission)

Day 2 – Tuesday 9th December
9:00am- 5:15pm, Tuesday, W5C 220.

Day 3 – Wednesday 10th December
9:00am- 5:15pm, Wednesday, W5C220

Contact
For details, please contact Dr Shirley Chan, shirley.chan@mq.edu.au, +612 98507021

Programme 1-12a Extract

In the past four decades, the discovery of previously unknown texts dating to the fourth century BCE and to the Han Dynasty, as well as older versions of known texts, has revolutionized the study of early Chinese philosophy and history. The texts are of great significance in understanding the development of the major strands in Chinese thought particularly what we now speak of as “Daoism” and “Confucianism” — that have had enduring significance in many Asian cultures, and in allowing us a fresh opportunity to ask crucial questions about ancient Chinese culture and history. Experts and key researchers in the fields of early Chinese writing and classical Chinese thought are being invited to contribute to the discussion of the topics in terms of modes of manuscript production, Chinese intellectual history, and new interpretations of Chinese thought as revealed in these newly recovered texts. The conference has received overwhelming response from international and local scholars. We expect the bilingual discussion to provide a rare platform for exchange among Chinese and Western scholars, significantly advancing the frontiers of knowledge of early China and traditional Chinese culture. Admission to the conference is free.

There are more than 30 speakers from universities in Australia, China, America, Singapore and Hong Kong including the following:

* Australian National University
* Beijing Normal University
* Bohai University
* Capital Normal University
* Chinese Academy of Social Sciences
* DePaul University
* East China Normal University
* Fudan University
* University of Hawaii
* University of Hong Kong
* Hubei University of Economics
* Ji’ning University
* Lehigh University
* Macquarie University
* University of Melbourne
* Nanjing University
* National University of Singapore
* Peking University
* University of Sydney
* University of Technology Sydney
* Tsinghua University
* Wuhan University

More information is available at: http://arts.mq.edu.au/news_and_events/events/faculty_conferences/reading_the_old_in_the_light_of_the_newly_discovered_chinese_philosophy_and_ancient_chinese_texts

 

December 1, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | no comments

CFP: Education and the Hong Kong Umbrella Movement

This is a call for submissions to a special issue of the journal Educational Philosophy and Theory, which will be edited by Liz Jackson and Timothy O’Leary of the University of Hong Kong.

The Umbrella Movement, a student-led series of protests, occupations and collaborations across different social groups, has permanently altered the social and political landscape of Hong Kong. In marked contrast to the depoliticized, capitalist orientation that predominated in the public sphere in the past, the Umbrella Movement is marked by youth performance of alternative values of collaboration, accountability, and communitarian care. Participants in the Umbrella Movement, both students and educators, are finding new ways to nurture experiential learning in student-authored contexts, in contrast with the teacher- and test-centered education historically customary in Hong Kong. Resistance to the conservative political values of Hong Kong, that preclude local youth democratic participation in revising and reshaping the society, lies at the heart of this movement.

This Special Issue of Educational Philosophy and Theory examines the Umbrella Movement as not only a political movement, but also an alternative form of education that is framed by student resistance and the desire by young people to reclaim their cultural, social, and political world.

Continue reading “CFP: Education and the Hong Kong Umbrella Movement”

November 30, 2014 Posted by | Call for Papers (CFP), Hong Kong, Pedagogy, Politics, Popular Culture | no comments

Early China 37 (2014) Available

From Sarah Allan (editor): Early China 37 (2014) is now available. You need this journal and the Society for the Study of Early China needs your support.  We have kept the price down, only $60 for a regular membership and $40 for a student or retired person, and you get online access as well as the print version. Please subscribe NOW at: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/memServHome?name=SSECHome. Table of Contents follows….

Continue reading “Early China 37 (2014) Available”

November 30, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Journal News, Tables of Contents | no comments

Olberding, ed., Dao Companion to the Analects is Published

The exhaustive and high-quality Dao Companion to the Analects, edited by Amy Olberding, has been released. Springer site is here; Amazon is here. Congratulations, Amy! The Table of Contents follows…

Continue reading “Olberding, ed., Dao Companion to the Analects is Published”

November 30, 2014 Posted by | Analects, Books of Interest, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative Political Theory, Confucianism, Confucius | 10 comments

Huang’s Why Be Moral? is Published

I am excited to note the publication of Yong HUANG’s Why Be Moral? Learning from the Neo-Confucian Cheng Brothers, the fruit of many years of research. The SUNY Press site is here, and Amazon is here. Here is the editorial description:

Yong Huang presents a new way of doing comparative philosophy as he demonstrates the resources for contemporary ethics offered by the Cheng brothers, Cheng Hao (1032–1085) and Cheng Yi (1033–1107), canonical neo-Confucian philosophers. Huang departs from the standard method of Chinese/Western comparison, which tends to interest those already interested in Chinese philosophy. While Western-oriented scholars may be excited to learn about Chinese philosophers who have said things similar to what they or their favored philosophers have to say, they hardly find anything philosophically new from such comparative work. Instead of comparing and contrasting philosophers, each chapter of this book discusses a significant topic in Western moral philosophy, examines the representative views on this topic in the Western tradition, identifies their respective difficulties, and discusses how the Cheng brothers have better things to say on the subject. Topics discussed include why one should be moral, how weakness of will is not possible, whether virtue ethics is self-centered, in what sense the political is also personal, how a moral theory can be of an antitheoretical nature, and whether moral metaphysics is still possible in this postmodern and postmetaphysical age.

Versions of some of the chapters have been published or presented at conferences over the years, so Huang’s general approach is well-known. Now that we have a full, book-length presentation, there is sure to be renewed attention paid to Huang’s important arguments as they concern ethics, the goals and methodology of comparative philosophy, and the interpretation of the Cheng brothers. Discussion welcome!

November 29, 2014 Posted by | Books of Interest, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Ethical Theory, Neo-Confucianism | one comment

New E-Journal on World Philosophies

The first issue of Confluence: An International Journal of World Philosophies has been published; see here for more information and free access to the first issue.

November 25, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Journal News | 5 comments

New Comparative Political Thought Program

Beginning from the academic year of 2015/16 Central European University (CEU) in Budapest will launch an interdisciplinary Specialization in Political Thought for graduate students. The program puts a strong emphasis on comparative perspectives and non-Western political thought.

Continue reading “New Comparative Political Thought Program”

November 24, 2014 Posted by | Comparative Political Theory, Graduate study | no comments

Sun’s Confucianism as a World Religion wins multiple awards

Anna Sun’s book Confucianism as a World Religion has won two major awards:

  • 2014 Best Book Award, Sociology of Religion Section of the American Sociological Association
  • 2014 Best First Book in the History of Religions Award, American Academy of Religion

Congratulations, Anna!

November 23, 2014 Posted by | Books of Interest, Confucianism, Contemporary Confucianism, Religion | no comments

Education About Asia is now Open-Access

The excellent journal devoted to pedagogy about Asia (from K-12 through university education), Education About Asia, is now available open-access. Over the years it has had articles about teaching Chinese philosophy, among many other subjects.

November 23, 2014 Posted by | American Philosophical Association, China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Journal News, Pedagogy | no comments

New Book on Daoism

Three Pines Press proudly announces the second volume in our new series
Contemporary Chinese Scholarship in Daoist Studies

Rediscovering the Roots of Chinese Thought: Laozi’s Philosophy
by CHEN Guying, translated by Paul D’Ambrosio
ISBN 978-1-931483-61-2
paperback, 150 pages, bibliography, index
available January 1, 2015
US $27.95
prepublication special: US $22.50
ORDER NOW: www.threepinespress.com<http://www.threepinespress.com/>

Continue reading “New Book on Daoism”

November 20, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Daodejing, Daoism, Laozi, Zhuangzi | no comments

Confucian Traditions Group panels at AAR

The Confucian Traditions Group is sponsoring two panels for this year’s AAR: “Nurturing Moral Children: Confucian Visions of Parenthood and Childhood” and “Confucian Secularism.” Read on for details.

Continue reading “Confucian Traditions Group panels at AAR”

November 20, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Conference, Confucianism | one comment

Jobs at NTU

Two Openings in Nanyang Technological University (Singapore)

The Philosophy Program of Nanyang Technological University is searching for an associate professor (with tenure) in Chinese and Comparative Philosophy and a tenure-track assistant professor of philosophy (AOS open), to begin in July 2015. The due day for application is 28 December 2014. For more information, please go to http://www.hss.ntu.edu.sg/Programmes/philosophy/Pages/Faculty-Positions.aspx

November 20, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Job Opening | no comments

NDPR Review: Franklin Perkins, Heaven and Earth Are Not Humane

Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews

2014.11.23  View this Review at NDPR   View Other NDPR Reviews

Franklin Perkins, Heaven and Earth Are Not Humane: The Problem of Evil in Classical Chinese Philosophy, Indiana University Press, 2014, 295pp., $35.00 (pbk), ISBN 9780253011725.

Reviewed by Youngsun Back, City University of Hong Kong

The intriguing title, Heaven and Earth Are Not Humane, a line that originally appears in the Daodejing of Laozi, draws the reader into early Chinese philosophy. By exploring the problem of evil, Franklin Perkins opens new doors into this ancient tradition. The problem of evil in this book specifically refers to the fact that bad things happen to good people. Perkins examines the multiplicity of ways that philosophers of the Warring States period dealt with the problem of evil. His study focuses on six major texts, the Lunyu, Mozi, Daodejing, Mengzi, Zhuangzi, and Xunzi, but he incorporates a variety of recently excavated texts such as Xing zi ming chuTaiyi sheng shui, and Qiong da yi shi into his study as well.

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November 19, 2014 Posted by | Book Review, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy | 4 comments

Tim Connolly – Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy Lecture: “Virtue Ethics, Role Ethics, and the Early Confucian Self”, Dec. 5 @5:30pm

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes: TIM CONNOLLY (East Stroudsburg University)
With responses from: SCOTT R. STROUD (University of Texas at Austin)

Please join at Columbia University’s Religion Department on FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5 at 5:30PM for his lecture entitled:

“Virtue Ethics, Role Ethics, and the Early Confucian Self”

ABSTRACT: Confucian Role Ethics takes its point of departure from “a specific vision of human beings as relational persons constituted by the roles they live rather than as individual selves” (Ames and Rosemont, “Were the Early Confucians Virtuous?”). It is this vision, its proponents maintain, that makes it distinct not only from Western ethical theories such as deontology and utilitarianism, but also from Aristotelian and other forms of virtue ethics. But does CRE mean by contrasting “relational persons” with “individual selves”? In this paper, I examine three different versions of the contrast defended by CRE: the metaphysical thesis that for Confucius there is no “substantial self” left over once we take away a person’s social relations; the psychological thesis that there is no steadfast distinction between “inner” and “outer” in theAnalects; and the moral developmental thesis that Confucian self-cultivation always takes place within the context of roles. I argue that in each of these areas CRE can gain from a greater engagement with Aristotelian virtue ethics.

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5
5:30-7:30 pm
Rm. 101, 80 Claremont Ave, Columbia University
http://goo.gl/maps/zfUKH

 

November 18, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | 5 comments

“Confucianism Fever” in Qufu

An interesting Global Times article: http://www.globaltimes.cn/content/892060.shtml

November 18, 2014 Posted by | China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Confucianism, Contemporary Confucianism | one comment

Discussing “The Confucian Philosophy of Harmony” by LI Chenyang

The East Asian Studies Center at Indiana University is piloting a book workshop series this year. On Wednesday, November 19 from 8pm – 10pm EST Professor LI Chenyang will discuss his lastest book, The Confucian Philosophy of Harmony. Since this is a virtual presentation, we welcome all interested scholars and students to attend. You can log in here: https://connect.iu.edu/eabwli/ . Follow directions “to enter as a guest.” (For questions about the virtual-meeting software see here.)

November 17, 2014 Posted by | Conference | 2 comments

Redirect from warpweftandway.wordpress.com Ending

Two years ago, we moved the blog from WordPress’s server to a commercial server, mainly in order to make the blog available in the PRC, which has worked. Since then, we have paid to have visitors to the old url, warpweftandway.wordpress.com, automatically re-directed to the correct url, warpweftandway.com. With a few days, this redirection will end. So if you have any difficulty accessing the blog, please make sure that you are using the correct url! Please let Manyul or me know if you have any questions. Thanks!

November 16, 2014 Posted by | Blog details | no comments

New Book: The Stranger and the Chinese Moral Imagination

Not a work of philosophy, but certainly relevant to anyone concerned with contemporary China and contemporary Chinese philosophy, Haiyan Lee’s new book has just been published: The Stranger and the Chinese Moral Imagination by Stanford University Press (2014).

Continue reading “New Book: The Stranger and the Chinese Moral Imagination”

November 15, 2014 Posted by | Books of Interest, China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy | one comment

2015 Fu Foundation Essay Contest

Charles Wei-hsun Fu Foundation

ISCP Essay Contest in Asian Philosophy

The Charles Wei-hsun Fu Foundation and the International Society for Chinese Philosophy are pleased to announce the 2015 ISCP Essay Contest in Asian Philosophy.

Continue reading “2015 Fu Foundation Essay Contest”

November 15, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Opportunities | no comments

ISCP Conference Deadline Approaching

This is a reminder: the 19th international conference of ISCP will be held in Hong Kong in 2015. The deadline for submissions of paper proposals is Nov. 30, 2014.  The following is the link to the conference webpage, with information about submissions: http://phil.arts.cuhk.edu.hk/iscp/

November 15, 2014 Posted by | Call for Papers (CFP), Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Hong Kong | no comments

CFP: James Legge Conference

James Legge Conference, June 2015 – Call for Papers
<http://www.cswc.div.ed.ac.uk/2014/11/james-legge-conference-june-2015/>

James Legge: Missions to China and the Origins of Sinology
University of Edinburgh, 11-13 June 2015
Deadline for proposals: 31 March 2015

Continue reading “CFP: James Legge Conference”

November 14, 2014 Posted by | Call for Papers (CFP), Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | no comments

Roger Ames in People’s Daily

An article by Roger Ames, “儒学与世界文化秩序变革 (Confucianism and the Transformation of the International Cultural Order)” appeared in People’s Daily on Nov. 7.

November 14, 2014 Posted by | China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Confucianism, Contemporary Confucianism, Politics | no comments

Midwest Conference now has Website

See http://www.indiana.edu/~mcct for more information on the Midwest Conference on Chinese Thought.

November 11, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Conference | one comment

The Pursuit of Wisdom: Ancient Greek and Chinese philosophy and literature

Roundtable Discussions: The Pursuit of Wisdom: Ancient Greek and Chinese philosophy and literature

This inquiry aims to develop comparative perspectives on the pursuit of the good life in ancient Greek and Chinese philosophy and literature. It breaks new ground in the field of comparative philosophy and intellectual history, which to date presents extensive literature on comparative pictures of the good life. Yet, relatively few discussions focus on the processes necessary for attaining the good life. The innovative nature of this project lies in its focus on the processes associated with the pursuit of wisdom in the respective traditions. The attention here will be on issues concerned with practice, discipline, resources required for such pursuits, as well as their underlying epistemological assumptions.

Registration

Attendance is free but registration is essential. Please register here: https://pursuitofwisdomroundtable.wordpress.com/

Invited Speakers
Professor Rick Benitez, School of Philosophical and Historical Enquiry, University of Sydney
Mr Drago Heler, Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics, Charles Sturt University
Mr Anthony Hooper, School of Philosophical and Historical Enquiry, University of Sydney
Dr Cullan Joyce, Catholic Theological College, MCD University, Melbourne
Dr Hyun Jin Kim, School of Historical and Philosophical Studies, University of Melbourne
Dr Esther Klein, School of Languages and Cultures & China Studies Centre, University of
A/Prof Karyn Lai, School of Humanities and Languages, University of New South Wales
Dr Michaelis Michael, School of Humanities and Languages, University of New South Wales
Dr Ping Wang, School of Humanities and Languages, University of New South Wales

Roundtable Dates & Times
Thurs 27 Nov 2014, 10 am – 6 pm
Fri 28 Nov 2014, 10 am – 5pm

Roundtable Venue
Morven Brown Building, Lv 2, Room 209
UNSW Kensington, Sydney, Australia

Contact
A/Prof Karyn Lai: k.lai@unsw.edu.au

November 10, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | no comments

HKU Forum on Umbrella Movement

This Forum, featuring five Hong Kong University faculty (ncluding philosophers and political theorists) is well-worth watching!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c5i-Ela25OQ

November 10, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Comparative Political Theory, Hong Kong, Political Theory, Politics | one comment

CUHK Masters and PhD Programs in Chinese Philosophy

2015 Master and Ph.D Programs in Chinese University of Hong Kong
The Chinese University of Hong Kong has the biggest graduate program in philosophy in Hong Kong. Its faculty has the roughly equal strength in Chinese philosophy (5 faculty members), analytic philosophy (4 faculty members), and Continental Europe philosophy (5 faculty members). Please read on for more details!

Continue reading “CUHK Masters and PhD Programs in Chinese Philosophy”

November 9, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Graduate study, Opportunities | 3 comments

Two More Book Reviews

Xiaomei Yang’s review of Stephen C. Angle (Ph.D, 1994) and Michael Slote, eds., Virtue Ethics and Confucianism has appeared in the most recent issue of Ethics, Vol. 125,# 1, 2014.

Joseph’s Chan’s feature review of my book Contemporary Confucian Political Philosophy: Toward Progressive Confucianism has just appeared in Philosophy East and West, Vol. 64,#3,2014, as well as two follow-ups:

  • Joseph Chan. “’Self-Restriction’ and the Confucian Case for Democracy.”
  • Stephen C. Angle. “Sages and Self-Restriction: A Response to Joseph Chan.”
  • Joseph Chan. “Reply to Stephen C. Angle.”

November 9, 2014 Posted by | Book Review, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Comparative Political Theory, Contemporary Confucianism, Virtue | no comments

Review of new book from Bongrae Seok

SEOK, Bongrae, Embodied Moral Psychology and Confucian Philosophy
Lanham: Lexington Books, 2013, xvi + 197 pages

How can Confucian philosophy provide a useful path toward understanding the basic
processes of human moral psychology? This is the question that SEOK Bongrae’s new
book Embodied Moral Psychology and Confucian Philosophy strives to answer.
To the uninitiated, Confucian philosophy will be an unlikely resource, even an
anachronism with respect to current issues in philosophy, especially with regard to
issues in cognitive science and the philosophy of mind. However, a revival of
Confucian ideas is taking place, with articles, conferences, monographs, and edited
volumes devoted to its relevance to a variety of areas of current philosophy, both
analytic and continental. Seok’s book is a fine example from this trend. Trained in the
philosophy of mind and cognitive science at the University of Arizona, Seok has turned
to the Confucian tradition for insights that can extend our understanding of how the
human mind makes moral decisions.

Seok divides his book into two parts. The first is a background on embodied
cognition and how Confucian philosophy is a natural candidate for explorations of
embodiment. The second explores and elucidates particular aspects of Confucian moral
psychology and then brings them into dialogue with current debates in moral psychology,
specifically, with regard to the character/situationist debate. In the five chapters of
these two sections, Seok makes a convincing case for the importance of what he calls
situated Confucian virtue. …

Full review can be found here: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11712-014-9411-0?sa_campaign=email/event/articleAuthor/onlineFirst

November 7, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | no comments

Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy lecture by Hagop Sarkissian: “On Wielding Moral Sway: Influence and Manipulation in Social Networks”, Friday November 14 @5:30pm

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes: HAGOP SARKISSIAN (Baruch College)

Please join at Columbia University’s Religion Department on FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 14 at 5:30PM for his lecture entitled:

“On Wielding Moral Sway: Influence and Manipulation in Social Networks”

ABSTRACT: Many of us value our independence, yet none of us is an independent actor in any profound sense. Rather, we are deeply affected by others in our local and extended networks in subtle yet significant ways. What’s more, we return the favor–influencing the trajectory of others’ lives (whether we intend to or not). These facts, recently articulated in the behavioral and health sciences, raise certain questions. Do we have (previously unacknowledged) responsibilities to others if we do, in fact, continually exercise such influence on them—even if at a distance? Should we shape and mind our influence? If so, do we risk being paternalistic, even manipulative? From our perspective today, rooting out patterns of influence and then wielding them toward specific goals might seem unsavory. Nevertheless, I will argue that such strategies may make perfect sense once we become a) vividly aware of the predictable patterns of such resonant influence, and b) convinced that escaping such influence is a foolish enterprise. And whereas we are only recently coming to grips with this phenomenon, several early Confucian texts seem to take it as a fundamental orientation, which motivated an ethics centered on the notions of self-regulation, sway, and harmony. Indeed, wielding moral sway is, from this perspective, a hallmark of the virtuous person. I argue that classical Confucianism, while a tradition of thought quite distant from us, nonetheless contains important resources for understanding how we can better resonate with others and, in turn, how we can turn such resonance into human harmony.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 14
5:30-7:30 pm
Rm. 101, 80 Claremont Ave, Columbia University
http://goo.gl/maps/zfUKH

 

UPCOMING COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY EVENTS:
Friday, December 5 – Timothy Connolly (East Stroudsburg University)

 

PLEASE VISIT OUR WEBSITE: http://www.cbs.columbia.edu/cscp/

November 4, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | 5 comments

Berge-Becker at Columbia Neo-Confucianism Seminar

The next session of the Columbia University Seminar on Neo-Confucian Studies will convene Friday, November 7 from 3:30 to 5:30pm in the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University.

Zach Berge-Becker of Columbia University will present the paper “Imagined Seclusion: The Construction of Su Shi’s (1037-1101) Literary Persona at Huangzhou.”  A copy of the paper can be obtained by contacting the organizers.
All are welcome to attend.   Please join us after the seminar for dinner at a location to be announced.

Continue reading “Berge-Becker at Columbia Neo-Confucianism Seminar”

November 4, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Lecture, Neo-Confucianism | no comments

New Cooperation Between CityU and Duke

Duke University’s Center for Comparative Philosophy and the Center for East Asian and Comparative Philosophy (CEACOP) at City University of Hong Kong are happy to announce an exciting new partnership . These two centers will initiate regular student and faculty exchanges, co-sponsor international conferences and workshops, and jointly teach courses, beginning with a new course this spring that can be taken for credit at either campus, Eastern and Western Conceptions of Human Nature, Ethics, and Politics. Additional cooperative programs will follow in the coming years. Read on for information about the new joint course.

Continue reading “New Cooperation Between CityU and Duke”

November 2, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Hong Kong, Organization News, Pedagogy | one comment

The UPDirectory: Directory of Philosophers from Underrepresented Groups in Philosophy

From http://www.underrepresentedphilosophers.com/.

A Directory listing is currently being compiled; the list will include philosophers previously listed in the Women of Philosophy Directory, The Black Philosophers Directory, The Asian Philosophers Directory, the Latina/o and Hispanic Philosophers Directory, etc.

All of these individual directories are now being combined into a single directory of philosophers from underrepresented groups in philosophy — the UPDirectory. The UPDirectory will replace the individual directories, which will not be published. Nonetheless, all the information from each individual directory will be contained in the UPDirectory. The goal of the directory is to have a single, easy-to-use resource for people who want to learn more about the work of philosophers who belong to underrepresented groups in philosophy.

For technical reasons, we need new entries from everyone, even from those who already filled out information for a previous directory. If you would like to be included in the new UPDirectory, please click on the link below

http://www.underrepresentedphilosophers.com/updirectory-entry-submission-form/

which will take you to an Entry Re-submission Form. When you’ve completed the form, please click on the ‘Submit’ button. That’s all you need to do to appear in the UPDirectory! We ask that you fill out this form by November 27th. Please note that participation is fully voluntary, and you need not provide any information you do not wish to include in your entry.

November 2, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | no comments

New Chinese-language Journal: 《南國學術 》

The University of Macau has begun publishing a new journal,《南國學術 》(South China Quarterly), the contents of which are available on-line here. I will post the Tables of Contents of the latest issue (no. 3) and the upcoming issue (no. 4) below.

Continue reading “New Chinese-language Journal: 《南國學術 》”

November 1, 2014 Posted by | China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Journal News, Tables of Contents | no comments

Postdoc at City University of Hong Kong

City U’s Centre for East Asian and Comparative Philosophy is advertising a postdoc that will be of interest to readers of this blog. I’ll post some highlights below the fold and then link to the complete listing.

Continue reading “Postdoc at City University of Hong Kong”

November 1, 2014 Posted by | Opportunities | no comments

Laozi on Marriage?

A blog reader asked: I just found Laozi’s having the following quote attributed to him (on several quote-collecting websites):

“Marriage is three parts love and seven parts forgiveness of sins.”

Do you have any idea whether this is actually from a *text* attributed to him, and if so, which?  (None of the sites I have found gives one.)  If not, would you mind asking about this on the blog?

November 1, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Daoism, Laozi | 11 comments

“Boston Confucian” Lecture Series, with The Wisdom of Chinese Art Nov. 7

Students at Boston University are putting on a good-looking lecture series; click here for details. This coming Friday, Yair Lior will be presenting on “The Wisdom of Chinese Art”:

The lecture will be titled “The Wisdom of Chinese Art” and will look at different philosophical ideas that inform Chinese art theory, especially landscape painting. It will also look at the unique relationship between Chinese calligraphy, the literati class, and the development of Song-Yuan landscapes. These themes will be explored with constant allusions to concepts of perspective, brush techniques, and choices of subject-matter in European oil painting. Perhaps most importantly, the lecture will give us an opportunity to look at the beautiful images produced by Chinese painters.

October 31, 2014 Posted by | Aesthetics, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy | 2 comments

New Book: Teaching the I Ching

NEW BOOK ANNOUNCEMENT

We wish to announce our new book, Teaching the I Ching (Book of Changes), by Geoffrey Redmond and Tze-ki Hon, published by the American Academy of Religion and Oxford University Press, 2014.

Continue reading “New Book: Teaching the I Ching”

October 31, 2014 Posted by | Books of Interest, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Yi Jing (Book of Changes) | no comments

Dao Interested in Reviewers of Chinese Books

BAI Tongdong, professor at Fundan University, is in charge of reviews of Chinese-language books for Dao. He recently sent around a list of new books in which he is potentially interested in a review. Anyone interested in reviewing one of these books, please contact Prof. Bai directly. In addition, I thought that many readers might be interested in Prof. Bai’s list of these books, so it is posted below.

Continue reading “Dao Interested in Reviewers of Chinese Books”

October 30, 2014 Posted by | Books of Interest, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy | no comments

New Analects Translation

Penguin has recently brought out a new translation of, and commentary on, the Analects, by Annping Chin. The Amazon page is here, at which one can get a good sense of the format and goals of this new translation. Considerable comentary is appended after each passage, with a combination of Chin’s own thoughts and comments from mostly post-Song (primarily Qing to the present) scholars. Chinese text is provided in an appendix. Anyone have any thoughts on this new translation?

October 30, 2014 Posted by | Analects, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Confucius, Translation | 18 comments

Analogies, Models and Images in Early Chinese and Græco-Roman Ethics

Analogies, Models and Images in Early Chinese and Græco-Roman Ethics

Symposium, Institute of Philosophy, Berne 12th-15th December

 

Space is limited. Please register by contacting the convenor Prof. Richard King (richard.king@philo.unibe.ch).

Continue reading “Analogies, Models and Images in Early Chinese and Græco-Roman Ethics”

October 27, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy | one comment

In Memoriam: David S. Nivison (1923-2014)

American sinologist and philosopher David Nivison passed away on the 16th of this month. Nivison was a true polymath and made tremendous contributions to a variety of fields that overlapped with Chinese thought and history. For most readers of this blog, he will perhaps be best remembered for his contributions to Chinese philosophy, which was greatly enriched by his work on Daoists and Confucian philosophers across history, including the classical period as well as the Song, Ming and Qing dynasties. For much of his adult life, he also served as one of a small handful of scholars working on Chinese thought under the aegis of a Western philosophy department, and played a major role in integrating Chinese philosophy with contemporary philosophy as practiced in the English-speaking world. Among his best-known books are The Life and Thought of Chang Hsueh-ch’eng, The Ways of Confucianism, and The Riddle of the Bamboo Annals.

There are two substantial obituaries available on-line. One in English and the other in Chinese. The latter includes a nice collection of photographs.

October 24, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | one comment