Warp, Weft, and Way

Chinese and Comparative Philosophy 中國哲學與比較哲學

Discussion of Slote’s “Reset Button”

The article from the current issue of Dao that we have chosen for discussion is Michael Slote’s “The Philosophical Reset Button: A Manifesto,” available via open-access here. This time around, we offer opening comments from both BAI Tongdong of Fudan University, and myself (Steve Angle). Those comments follow here, and let the discussion begin!

Continue reading “Discussion of Slote’s “Reset Button””

April 9, 2015 Posted by | China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Dao Article Discussion, Emotions | 8 comments

Important Facebook Detail

IMPORTANT: If you rely on Facebook to notify you of posts on Warp Weft and Way and you have “liked” it already, because of the updated format of the page, you will need to go to the page and select “Get Notifications” where it indicates that you already have “Liked” the Facebook page (look on the big picture of the ox). Remarkably, for Facebook, liking the page does not automatically sign you up for receiving notifications from the page.

April 20, 2015 Posted by | Blog details | no comments

Bell on the Challenges of Teaching “Western Values”

Daniel Bell’s latest New York Times op-ed: “Teaching ‘Western Values’ in China” grapples with some of the difficulties with teaching and researching both “Western” and “Chinese” values.

April 20, 2015 Posted by | China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Comparative Political Theory, Politics | no comments

Conference on Oneness in Hong Kong this weekend

International Conference on Oneness in Philosophy and Religion

Date: 25-27 April 2015

Venue: AC1-P4704, City University of Hong Kong

Conference program: http://www6.cityu.edu.hk/ceacop/Oneness/Conference_Oneness.pdf

April 20, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Conference | no comments

New Book: Brooks & Brooks, The Emergence of China

The long-awaited survey of Warring States China by E. Bruce Brooks and A. A. Taeko Brooks, The Emergence of China, has been published and is available for order through the University Press of New England‘s website. It should also be available before long on Amazon. Extracts are available here. Congratulations to Bruce and Taeko!

April 19, 2015 Posted by | Books of Interest, China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | no comments

New Book: Wang, Daoism Excavated

Daoism Excavated: Cosmos and Humanity in Early Manuscripts
by WANG Zhongjiang, translated by Livia Kohn
paperback, 230 pages
bibliography, index
ISBN 978-1-931483-62-9
June 1, 2015

Continue reading “New Book: Wang, Daoism Excavated”

April 19, 2015 Posted by | Books of Interest, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Cosmology, Daoism, Excavated Texts | no comments

CFP: ISCWP at 2016 APA Eastern

The ISCWP plans to sponsor one or two panels at the 2016 APA Eastern Division meeting.
Our Goal: We would like to encourage submissions of proposals of individual papers and panels. We encourage papers or panels that promote in-depth engagement between Chinese and Western philosophy. The submissions will be reviewed by all the three members of the board. When we select papers, we normally try to find papers that have common theme to form a panel. You may have a better chance to be accepted if you submit a panel proposal which already has a common theme.

For this year, we would especially like to encourage submissions to form at least one panel around the broad theme: Continental and Chinese Philosophy. Possible topics may include comparative work on individual figures (Heidegger, Levinas, Deleuze, Irigaray, Confucius, Mencius, Zhuangzi, etc.), topics from within these traditions (Hermeneutics and Chinese Philosophy, etc.), and work on 20th century Chinese philosophical figures such as Mou Zongsan, Tang Junyi, Xiong Shili, Liang Shuming, etc.

Continue reading “CFP: ISCWP at 2016 APA Eastern”

April 19, 2015 Posted by | Call for Papers (CFP), Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, European Continental Philosophy, Organization News | no comments

Bellum vs Zhan 戰: A Comparative Workshop in Early Military Thought

Bellum vs Zhan : A Comparative Workshop in Early Military Thought

Report by:

Steve Jackowicz, Ph.D.

On April 4th 2015 about thirty scholars and students of ancient warfare gathered at Princeton University’s Jones Hall to participate in a day long workshop exploring the differences and similarities between ancient Chinese and Roman conceptions of warfare. Organized by two Princeton graduate students, Mercedes Valmisa & Sara Vantournhout, the workshop brought together two esteemed scholars of disparate parts of the ancient world. Robin McNeal, Cornell University, presented selections from ancient Chinese texts on Righteous War, while Richard Billows, Columbia University, presented selections from Cicero exploring Just War Theory.

Continue reading “Bellum vs Zhan 戰: A Comparative Workshop in Early Military Thought”

April 15, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Conference, Military | no comments

2014 Dao Annual Best Essay Award Announcement

Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy, has been conducting the annual selection of the best essay since 2007. Its editorial board has just completed its deliberation in selecting the best paper published in 2014, and the award winner is Professor Peimin Ni of Grand Valley State University, for his paper, “Seek and You Will Find It; Let Go and You Will Lose It: Exploring a Confucian Approach to Human Dignity” (Dao 13 [2014]: 173-198). Congratulations, Peimin!

Continue reading “2014 Dao Annual Best Essay Award Announcement”

April 15, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Confucianism | 2 comments

11th Annual Midwest Conference on Chinese Thought (Program)

11th Annual Midwest Conference on Chinese Thought

North Central College, Naperville, IL

May 1-2, 2015

Friday, May 1

1:00-2:30  The Virtues of Mengzi (Chair: Aaron Stalnaker)

  • Dobin Choi (State University of New York, Buffalo): “Mengzi’s Maxim on Self-Cultivation for Righteousness in 2A2”
  • John Ramsey (Scripps College): “Are the Fruit of Duan of the Same Species? Mengzian Virtues as Heterogenous”
  • Franklin Perkins (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore): “Five Conducts (Wu xing 五行), Mengzi, and the Way of Heaven”

2:30-2:45  Break

Continue reading “11th Annual Midwest Conference on Chinese Thought (Program)”

April 10, 2015 Posted by | Conference | one comment

Facebook Page Update

Just a quick update about the Facebook page that is associated with the blog. The page has been converted (finally) to a public page rather than being a “personal” profile page. That increases its functionality for being linked automatically to the blog’s posts. Discussions can also be started on the Facebook page by anyone who wishes to post there. Posts are moderated — they have to be approved by an administrator before appearing.

Note: some of you who were following the Facebook page were dropped off the list in the transition. Please “like” the page again to resume following. Cheers.

April 9, 2015 Posted by | Blog details | no comments

Statistics on Asian Philosophy Panels at the 2015 Pacific APA

This last Saturday evening, I was carping to a colleague about the fact that three panels on Chinese philosophy were scheduled simultaneously during the very last time slot of the Group Program of the Pacific APA. Now that the APA has distributed a link to the evaluation survey, I decided to take a look at the actual numbers to see if there is a genuine issue of equity at the conference.

Below are the stats that I got from a first-time run-through of the main and group programs (I’m concerned with Asian philosophy broadly, which I categorized, following the panel titles or society names, as Chinese, Buddhist, Japanese, Comparative, and Martial Arts (didn’t see Indian, alas!)).

Continue reading “Statistics on Asian Philosophy Panels at the 2015 Pacific APA”

April 6, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Indian Philosophy, Japanese philosophy | 2 comments

New Book: Ethics in Public Life in Asia

Kenneth Winston of Harvard’s Kennedy School writes:

I am pleased to announce the publication of my book “Ethics in Public Life:  Good Practitioners in a Rising Asia” from Palgrave Macmillan.  The book is a set of five case studies of practitioners in different Asian countries making life-defining decisions in their work.  They include a doctor in Singapore, a political activist in India, a mid-level bureaucrat in central Asia, a religious missionary in China, and a journalist in Cambodia—each struggling with ethical challenges that shed light on what it takes to act effectively and well in public life.

Continue reading “New Book: Ethics in Public Life in Asia”

April 4, 2015 Posted by | Books of Interest, China, Confucianism, Virtue | no comments

April 3 Neo-Confucianism Seminar

The next session of the Columbia University Seminar on Neo-Confucian Studies will convene Friday, April 3, 2015 from 3:30 to 5:30pm in the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University. Chi-keung Chan 陳志強, a Ph.D candidate at The Chinese University of Hong Kong who is currently a Fulbright Visiting Scholar at Boston University, will present the paper “A Confucian Theory of Immorality: From Classical Confucianism to Neo-Confucianism.”   The main paper is in Chinese and is titled 《陽明與蕺山過惡思想的理論關聯-廉論「一滾說」的理論意涵》.   Copies of the paper, as well as an English summary and some additional recent work on that subject in English by the presenter, are available from the organizers. All are welcome to attend.  If you have any questions, contact one of our organizers: Ari Borrell (aborrell@msn.com), Tao Jiang (tjiang@rci.rutgers.edu), or Deborah Sommer (dsommer@gettysburg.edu).

March 28, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Confucianism, Neo-Confucianism, Wang Yangming | no comments

Major Update to Chinese Text Project

News from Donald Sturgeon, who has used optical character recognition to provide extraordinary searchable access to pre-modern Chinese texts online:

Chinese Text Project: over ten million pages of pre-modern Chinese texts now searchable online

A major update to the site has been made by applying OCR to over ten million pages of transmitted texts stored in the Library, linking scanned texts where possible to digital editions that follow them. Over 3000 existing texts have been successfully linked, allowing side-by-side display and textual searching of scanned texts.

Additionally, around ten thousand new texts and editions have also been transcribed for the first time using OCR. While these transcriptions inevitably contain many errors, they make it possible for the first time to search the scanned texts and immediately locate information within them. All newly transcribed texts have been added to the Wiki – please help by correcting errors when using these resources.

For further details, please see the OCR instructions.

March 26, 2015 Posted by | Chinese Texts, Databases, Resources | one comment

CFP: ISCP at 2016 Eastern APA

International Society for Chinese Philosophy (ISCP) plans to host two sessions at the 2016 Eastern Division Meeting of American Philosophical Association (APA) on January 6-9 at the Wardman Park Marriott in Washington D.C. You are invited to submit a panel proposal or a paper abstract.

Continue reading “CFP: ISCP at 2016 Eastern APA”

March 26, 2015 Posted by | American Philosophical Association, Call for Papers (CFP), Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Organization News | no comments

Penn Workshop on Non-Western Philosophical Traditions

This Friday there is a workship on non-Western philosophical traditions at Penn, co-sponsored by the philosophy department. It’s a shame this wasn’t publicized more, but here is the schedule for anyone who is interested. Continue reading “Penn Workshop on Non-Western Philosophical Traditions”

March 23, 2015 Posted by | Academia | one comment

Philosophy, Culture, and Public Life

A reflection by Rasmus Grønfeldt Winther (UC-Santa Cruz).

March 22, 2015 Posted by | Comparative philosophy | no comments

Pennsylvania Asian Studies Conference Upcoming

2015 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ASIAN STUDIES: BRINGING THE WORLD TO NORTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA
March 28 – 29, 2015, The University of Scranton, Pennsylvania, USA

Website
Press coverage

March 19, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Conference | no comments

New issue of Dao out / New article discussion upcoming

The latest issue of Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy has been published. We will continue our series of sponsoring discussion of an article from each issue; this time, we have chosen Michael Slote’s “The Philosophical Reset Button: A Manifesto.” It will be set to open-access, and within a week or so we will have a post announcing that the discussion is open. To whet your appetite, here is the abstract:

Continue reading “New issue of Dao out / New article discussion upcoming”

March 18, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Confucianism, Dao Article Discussion, Emotions, Profession | no comments

ACPA Newsletter

The 2015 ACPA Newsletter has been published, and can be accessed via their website at: http://www.acpa-net.org/news.html.

March 18, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Organization News | no comments

NECCT 4 Call for Abstracts

We hereby request submissions of abstracts for the Fourth Northeast Conference on Chinese Thought (NECCT), to be held at Southern Connecticut State University on Saturday and Sunday, November 7-8, 2015.

Interested scholars should send an abstract of no more than one single-spaced page, plus a current CV, to Tom Radice (radicet1@southernct.edu) and Xiaomei Yang (yangx1@southernct.eduno later than June 1, 2015. All files should either be in Word or .pdf format.

Continue reading “NECCT 4 Call for Abstracts”

March 18, 2015 Posted by | Call for Papers (CFP), Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Conference | no comments

MARKUS: A great tool for classical Chinese texts

MARKUS is an on-line tool that allows users to upload a file in classical Chinese and tag personal namesplace namestemporal references, and bureaucratic offices automatically, and that’s just for starters. It looks powerful and helpful; check it out here. Hilde de Weerdt describes some recent updates to MARKUS here.

March 15, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Resources | one comment

NEH and SEP

I recently received a letter from the editors of the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (SEP), suggesting that those who have benefitted from the NEH’s support for SEP might tell the nEH this, as part of the 50th anniversary of the NEH. Given SEP’s openness to non-Western philosophy, I thought this idea was a good one, and wanted to share the letter here, and encourage others to write to NEH as well!

Continue reading “NEH and SEP”

March 14, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Profession | one comment

New MOOC on Confucianism

Prof. Alan Chan of Nanyang Technological University in Singapore is currently working on a six-week MOOC on Confucian Philosophy. The course is now open for registration on Coursera, and will begin on 28 Sep 2015. More details of the MOOC can be found here: https://www.coursera.org/course/ntucp.

March 14, 2015 Posted by | Analects, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Confucianism, On-line courses | no comments

APA Pacific Commentator Needed

Due to some unexpected conflicts, the ACPA now needs another commentator for one of its sessions at APA Pacific 2015 (G7B: Ethics and Meaning of Life in Confuican and Daoist Philosophy, April 3, Friday evening 7-10pm). The paper is: Sean Drysdale Walsh (University of Minnesota Duluth), “Mencius and Aristotle on the Negative Duty to Flourish.” If anyone would be interested in commentating Prof. Walsh’s paper, please contact Huaiyu Wang as soon as possible.

March 14, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Conference, Organization News | no comments

NECCT 4 Information

The 4th Northeast Conference on Chinese Thought (NECCT) will be held on November 7 – 8, 2015 at Southern Connecticut State University in New Haven, CT. It will be co-sponsored with Yale’s Center for East Asian Studies and Wesleyan’s College of East Asian Studies. Expect an official call for abstracts in the near future.

March 11, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Conference | no comments

Weingarten review of Dissertation on Motherhood in Early China

Oliver Weingarten’s review of Smadar Winter’s University of Chicago Ph.D. dissertation, “Motherhood in Early China,” is available online. A couple highlights (from the review, not the dissertation itself):

  • “…An example of her disagreement with earlier scholarship is her response to attempts by Catherine Despeux and Livia Kohn to highlight the “prominence of motherhood” in the Laozi 老子. Winter counters this claim with a well-conceived alternative reading that argues for the secondary importance of motherhood in the text.”
  • “…In her conclusion, Winter revisits debates about two paradigms in the gender history of early China: “woman as victim” and “woman as agent.” While she acknowledges the importance of the latter, she reminds her readers that “women’s agency was always defined in the service of male interests.” (p. 215) To acknowledge this is crucial so as to not to forget the “forms of oppression from which early Chinese women have suffered.” Consequently, Winter argues against “a neutral-to-positive tone which seems to be saying: Yes, there was oppression, but women were still able to lead meaningful lives and fulfill their humanity in the roles that subordinated them.” (p. 216)”

March 11, 2015 Posted by | China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Comparative Political Theory, Gender | no comments

Sung in NDPR on Hutton’s Xunzi

Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews

2015.03.16 View this Review Online   View Other NDPR Reviews

Xunzi, XunziThe Complete Text, Eric L. Hutton (tr.), Princeton University Press, 2014, xxxi+ 397pp., $39.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780691161044.

Reviewed by Winnie Sung, Nanyang Technological University

Continue reading “Sung in NDPR on Hutton’s Xunzi”

March 11, 2015 Posted by | Book Review, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Confucianism, Translation, Xunzi | no comments

David Elstein – Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy Lecture: “The Possibility of a Confucian Doctrine of Free Expression”, Mar. 27 @5:30pm

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes: DAVID ELSTEIN (SUNY New Paltz)
With responses from: WARREN FRISINA (Hofstra University)

Please join at Columbia University’s Religion Department on FRIDAY, MARCH 27 5:30PM for his lecture entitled:

The Possibility of a Confucian Doctrine of Free Expression

ABSTRACT: Most contemporary New Confucian advocates for democracy take a robust right of free expression for granted as a necessary condition for democratic practice. Yet whether or how Confucianism can justify such a right is often passed over without much analysis. On the face of it, the case does not look good. Classical Confucians of course do not mention any such right, and what they do say is generally neutral or outright hostile to free expression. Various limitations on free expression have also been endorsed by later Confucians, including some contemporary thinkers. The usual liberal justifications of free expression as protecting individual autonomy and preserving access to truth probably will not work for Confucians. For one thing, autonomy is not valued in the same way as in liberalism. Second, Confucians have generally been confident that truth and falsehood can be reliably distinguished by the more enlightened and there is not much to be gained by allowing the persistence of obviously false doctrines. The bigger concern is the harm false doctrines can cause. In this paper I will examine Confucian opposition to free expression, where Confucians will disagree with liberal views, and consider whether Confucianism can justify free expression along with how the Confucian right may differ in application. Continue reading “David Elstein – Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy Lecture: “The Possibility of a Confucian Doctrine of Free Expression”, Mar. 27 @5:30pm”

March 10, 2015 Posted by | Comparative philosophy, Confucianism, Lecture | 7 comments

CFP: Conference at Bond University, Australia

The deadline is coming soon for proposals for this event…

International Symposium:  Confucianism and Modern Society

Bond University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.

14/15th May 2015

Call for proposals

Confucianism was founded by Confucius (551-479 BCE), a great thinker and educator in China. As a way of life and a body of thought, it has evolved for two and a half millennia. The vitality of this school of thought, with its emphasis on such key virtues as benevolence, tolerance and reciprocity, has persisted to the present time.

Will the vitality of the Confucian tradition serve and advance modern society? 

Continue reading “CFP: Conference at Bond University, Australia”

March 10, 2015 Posted by | Call for Papers (CFP), Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Confucianism | no comments

Philosophy Meets Cultural Diversity, 13-14 March 2015 at University of Pittsburgh

This conference should be of interest to anyone working on issues in comparative thought and philosophy. A terrific lineup of speakers and panelists (if I do say so myself). -HS

Over the last decade, the newly emerging field of “experimental philosophy” has posed a challenge to the claim that professional philosophers’ judgments about philosophically important thought experiments are universal. Rather, in a growing number of studies, it has been shown that people in different cultural groups – Asians and Westerners, males and females, people of high and low socio-economic status, people with different personality types, people of different ages, people with different native languages, etc. – have different intuitions about cases designed to explore what people think about knowledge, morality, free will, consciousness and other important philosophical issues. However, the extent and sources of this variation remain by and large unknown. The goal of this conference is to bring together anthropologists, psychologists, comparative philosophers, and experimental philosophers in order to further our understanding of the similarities and differences in the lay understanding of, on the one hand, knowledge, and, on the other, agency and person across cultures. Furthermore, we hope to sketch new avenues of research for philosophically sophisticated cross-cultural studies of the concepts of knowledge, person, and agency.

Invited Speakers
Continue reading “Philosophy Meets Cultural Diversity, 13-14 March 2015 at University of Pittsburgh”

March 8, 2015 Posted by | Comparative philosophy, Conference, Epistemology, Moral Psychology, Psychology, The Self | one comment

New Book: The Philosophical Challenge from China

A new book full of specially written essays that aim to bring out ways in which Chinese philosophy can fruitfully challenge contemporary Western (especially analytic) philosophy, The Philosophical Challenge from China, edited by Brian Bruya, is about to be published by MIT Press. More information is here, and I will repeat the publisher’s description here. Congratulations, Brian!

Continue reading “New Book: The Philosophical Challenge from China”

March 7, 2015 Posted by | Books of Interest, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy | 3 comments

CFP: Special Issue of Dao

From Yong Huang, Editor of Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy

Call for Papers for a special issue of Dao on Chinese and Comparative Philosophy: Theoretical and Methodological Reflections

In conjunction with our academic sponsor, Association of Chinese Philosophers in America, which is going to celebrate its 20th anniversary, Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy, which will have its own 15thbirthday, plans to publish a special issue (or special topic, depending upon the number of finally accepted papers; if more than enough papers are finally accepted, some space may be reserved for this theme in the immediately following issue), on the theme “Chinese and Comparative Philosophy: Theoretical and Methodological Reflections.” The inaugural issue of our journal was featured by an article of this nature by Robert Neville: “Two Forms of Comparative Philosophy.” Now, after 15 years of publication of quality articles and book reviews in Chinese and comparative philosophy, it is time for us to reflect on this issue again.

Continue reading “CFP: Special Issue of Dao”

March 7, 2015 Posted by | Call for Papers (CFP), Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Methodology | no comments

Discussion: Kinney on Lee on Confucian Theories of Children

Our thanks to Anne Behnke Kinney for these initial comments on Pauline Lee’s fine essay, “Two Confucian Theories on Children and Childhood” (free access here). Comments on the essay, on Professor Kinney’s remarks, or on the general topic are hereby encouraged!

One thread of Pauline C. Lee’s fascinating analysis of childhood as presented in Confucian texts considers how Erik Erikson’s view of childhood, which concentrates attention on “crisis moments and delineates among important life stages,” compares to Confucian views, which focus on “the social child,” “role-specific duties for a junior in society,” and “day-to-day maintenance.”

Continue reading “Discussion: Kinney on Lee on Confucian Theories of Children”

March 5, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | 10 comments

Frontiers of Philosophy in China 10:1

The latest issue of Frontiers of Philosophy in China has been published. Enjoy!

March 4, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Emotions, Philosophy of Mind, Tables of Contents | no comments

Impending discussion of Lee on Confucian Theories of Childhood

Our regular series discussing articles from the journal Dao will continue in a couple days; Anne Behnke Kinney of the University of Virginia has prepared a set of comments on Pauline Lee’s “Two Confucian Theories on Children and Childhood” (which appeared in the latest issue of Dao), and we will post Kinney’s comments on Thursday. Per our agreement with the journal, that article has been set Open Access, so everyone can freely download it. Please take a look, and join in the discussion (starting Thursday).

March 3, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Dao Article Discussion | no comments

Varieties of the Self Conference at Scripps

An exciting conference called “Varieties of the Self” will be held this weekend at Scripps College; speaks include Kwong-loi Shun on Confucian ideas, Eric Schwitzgebel on Zhuangzi, and Robin Wang on an alternative Daoist approach. More information is here.

March 3, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Conference | 4 comments

Angle at Columbia Neo-Confucianism Seminar

I’ll be discussing some of Justin Tiwald’s and my work-in-progress at next week’s Neo-Confucianism seminar; hope to see some of you there! Here’s the official announcement:

The next session of the Columbia University Seminar on Neo-Confucian Studies (Seminar #567) will convene Friday, March 6, 2015 from 3:30 to 5:30pm in the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University. Steve Angle will present the paper “Varieties of Knowing,” which is a draft of Chapter 5 of a forthcoming work (co-written with Justin Tiwald) titled Neo-Confucianism: A Philosophical Introduction. All are welcome to attend. Please contact  Deborah Sommer (dsommer@gettysburg.edu) if you’d like a copy of the paper.

February 26, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Epistemology, Neo-Confucianism | no comments

Princeton Comparative Workshop in Early Military Thought

The East Asian Studies Program and the IHUM present:

Bellum vs zhan 戰: A Comparative Workshop in Early Military Thought

When: April 4th 2015 (Saturday)
Where: 202 Jones Hall, Princeton University

To register please contact Mercedes Valmisa at mvalmisa@princeton.edu. Please indicate if you would like to join for lunch, dinner or both. RSVP before March 10.

Continue reading “Princeton Comparative Workshop in Early Military Thought”

February 24, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Conference | no comments

CFP: ASACP 2015 Conference

Australasian Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy Conference 2015

Call for Papers

Asian Perspectives on Mind, Action and Cultivation

 
Conference Details

The ASACP Conference 2015 will be hosted by Monash University.
Dates: 10 July (Friday) – 12 July (Sunday) 2015
Venue: Monash University Caulfield Campus, Caulfield, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Continue reading “CFP: ASACP 2015 Conference”

February 24, 2015 Posted by | Call for Papers (CFP), Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy | no comments

Topic Modelling Experiment

Ryan Nichols and Ted Slingerland, both longtime readers of this blog, write with an invitation to blog readers to help them out by participating in an experiment. Read on!

Dear Warp, Weft, and Way users,

As affiliates of the University of British Columbia’s Cultural Evolution of Religion Consortium (CERC), we write to invite Warp, Weft, & Way users with some training in classical Chinese to participate in an experiment. Several years ago we embarked on a project to use quantitative methods of analysis, including statistical testing and unsupervised data mining, in order to gain new insights into classical Chinese texts. Our corpus, drawn from Donald Sturgeon’s ctext.org, a resource we all know and enjoy, contains over 5 million characters from texts that date from pre-Warring States through the Tang.

Continue reading “Topic Modelling Experiment”

February 24, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | 3 comments

El Amine Reviews Kim, Confucian Democracy in East Asia

Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews

2015.02.31 View this Review Online   View Other NDPR Reviews

Sungmoon Kim, Confucian Democracy in East Asia: Theory and Practice, Cambridge University Press, 2014, 321pp., $29.99 (pbk), ISBN 9781107641211.

Reviewed by Loubna El Amine, Georgetown University

Sungmoon Kim’s book offers an important and passionate defense of democracy, especially as it applies to East Asian countries. It moves the current debate on the topic from the question of whether democracy is relevant to, and compatible with, the East Asian context, to the question of “the particular mode of Confucian democracy” that is suitable for East Asia (247). In other words, the starting premise of Kim’s inquiry is the simple fact that democracy does already exist in that part of the world, including in South Korea, Taiwan, and (“arguably,” according to Kim), in Hong Kong (247). The question then is, what form of democracy does, will, and should work in East Asia?

Continue reading “El Amine Reviews Kim, Confucian Democracy in East Asia”

February 23, 2015 Posted by | Book Review, Books of Interest, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Comparative Political Theory, Korea, Political Theory, Politics | no comments

Korean Philosophy Newsletter

I post here the latest Quarterly E-Newsletter of the North American Korean Philosophy Association (No. 5, February, 2015).

The NAKPA COURIER

New Year’s Greetings from the Desktop Editor

Dear Friends and Colleagues,

Greetings once again from Omaha, Nebraska, US, in the year of the “Goat”! I hope this letter finds you and all your loved ones well.

Continue reading “Korean Philosophy Newsletter”

February 23, 2015 Posted by | Comparative philosophy, Korean Philosophy | no comments

Naming, Identity, and Open Discussion

Actually, this post is less interesting philosophically than it sounds, though it concerns something that is important to Steve Angle and me in our roles serving as administrators of this blog. This post will remain on top for a bit, then its contents will be moved to the introductory side menu. PLEASE READ:

New Comments/Discussion Policy: We will be implementing, going forward, a policy that comment or discussion authors identify themselves by their actual full names (“last”/family name and given name), at least once in a post or discussion string, if their logged-in names do not already indicate them. It would also be good to have some small self-identifying epithet after a name — either an institutional affiliation, something like “no affiliation, (city name),” or anything else that helps to contextualize one’s identity. Any official contributors to the blog who are listed in the Contributors list can simply put “(see Contributors list)” after their names.

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February 23, 2015 Posted by | Blog details, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | 8 comments

Call for Papers and Panels: SACP at the APA East 2016

CALL FOR PAPER AND PANEL PROPOSALS

Including for a Special Workshop on How to Incorporate Asian Texts into Traditional Philosophy Courses

2016 Eastern Division Meeting of the American Philosophical Association

January 6-9, 2016, Washington, DC

The Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy welcomes proposals for our panels at the American Philosophical Association’s Eastern Division meeting. Proposals regarding any aspect of Asian or comparative philosophy are welcome.

This year, we especially welcome paper and panel proposals for a Special Workshop on How to Incorporate Asian Texts into Traditional Philosophy Courses. Workshop papers should be targeted at non-Asianists who want to incorporate Asian texts into a traditional philosophy course. Proposals for incorporating Asian texts into courses in any area of philosophy are welcome, including ethics, epistemology, metaphysics, aesthetics, introductory courses, philosophy of religion, philosophy of mind, moral psychology, logic, environmental philosophy, philosophy of gender, philosophy of law, social/political philosophy, etc.

Whether for the special workshop or other areas of Asian and comparative philosophy, please submit individual paper abstracts or complete panel proposals.

Paper abstracts should be 150-200 words in length.

Complete panel proposals should include: panel title, a 150 word introduction to the theme of the panel, and a 150 word abstract for each of the papers.

Include each presenter’s name, e-mail address, and institutional affiliation.

No simultaneous submissions, please.

Please submit these materials no later than May 7 to Brian Bruya at bbruya@emich.edu.

February 19, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | no comments

Interesting Overview Article on “CPT”

I’d like to call your attention to a valuable essay on “Comparative Political Theory”: Diego von Vacano, “The Scope of Comparative Political Theory,” Annual Review of Political Science.

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February 14, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative Political Theory | no comments

Tenure Track Position in Asian Philosophy

From Matthew Pierlott at West Chester University:

West Chester University of Pennsylvania is seeking applicants for the position of Assistant Professor of Philosophy, tenure-track position, to begin August 2015. AOS: Asian Philosophy; AOC: Open. The Department awards both BA and MA degrees in Philosophy, BA degrees in Religious Studies, and Graduate Cer­tificate Programs in Applied Ethics. Normal teaching load 12 hrs/semester. Minimum Qualifications: Evidence of scholarly aptitude and earned Ph.D. in Philosophy or Religious Studies; com­pletion of the Ph.D. required by August 30, 2015.

To view full job ad and to apply, go to http://agency.governmentjobs.com/wcupa/default.cfm.

 

February 10, 2015 Posted by | Job Opening, Opportunities | no comments

Confucian values and the rise of Asia

An essay by Robert D. Kaplan in the Wall Street Journal.

February 8, 2015 Posted by | Confucianism, In the News | 2 comments

3rd Annual SECC Conference

The Third Annual Society for the Study of Early China Conference

Time: Thursday, 26 March 2015, 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Location: Sheraton Chicago Hotel & Towers

For more information, see here.

February 7, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Conference, History | no comments

Job in Comparative Political Theory at SOAS

See here.

February 7, 2015 Posted by | Comparative Political Theory, Job Opening | no comments

Conference on Contemporary Buddhism in Ljubljana

International Symposium

BRIDGES BETWEEN ASIA AND EUROPE: BUDDHISM IN CONTEMPORARY SOCIETIES

University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Arts, Blue Room

March 12th – 14th 2015

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February 7, 2015 Posted by | Buddhism, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Conference | no comments

New IEP entries on Chinese Philosophy

An overview of topics in Chinese philosophy, by Ronnie Littlejohn; and an article on gender in Chinese philosophy, by Lijuan Shen and Paul D’Ambrosio. Looking forward to reading these in their entirety!

 

February 5, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | 2 comments

Workshop: Infusing Asian Philosophy into the Traditional Curriculum

Hey, Everyone,

I’m the program chair for the SACP panels at the APA East meeting, and I’m thinking of running a workshop for non-Asianists who want to include some Asian philosophy in the classroom.

The reason I’m writing is that I’m looking for ideas.

First let me tell you how I’m thinking about it. Suppose you could choose one text to include in a traditional philosophical anthology. The anthology would be in any specific area of philosophy or would be a basic introductory text. You would get to choose a short piece to represent any part of any Asian tradition that could be covered in one class period. That’s the first part of how to think about it. The second part of how to think of it would be: now what if a colleague came and asked you how to teach that text in the classroom? How would you explain it, or what kind of extra resources would you provide (in a reasonable amount) so that a non-Asianist could competently teach it without having to get a degree in it?

So, given those two ways of framing the issue, how should I approach this kind of panel? Should I open it to all Asian philosophy in general? Or should I focus on a specific philosophical area, such as ethics or epistemology? If the latter, which area would be a good first candidate?

Have any of your colleagues every shown an interest in such a thing? I broached the topic with a couple of colleagues today. One said that he’d be interested in a text from the Chinese tradition that he could use for an Intro class and would love to know how to teach it. Another said he’d be interested in an epistemology text from any non-Western tradition.

Do you think this kind of panel would garner any interest from non-Asianists at the meeting? Would people show up for a workshop on how to infuse Asian works of philosophy into their classrooms?

Finally, would any of you have an interest in answering this kind of call for papers? This would be pretty basic stuff from a specialist’s perspective.

Or is it a really bad idea to think that some non-Asianist could sit through a thirty minute lecture on an Asian text and then be competent to teach it?

Or is it a bad idea because we’d be ceding our turf?

All ideas are welcome. Feel free to shoot me down.

February 4, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Conference, Courses | 15 comments

New Book: Confucius and Wittgenstein

Jim Peterman’s Whose Tradition? Which Dao?: Confucius and Wittgenstein on Moral Learning and Reflection has been published; check it out.

January 31, 2015 Posted by | Books of Interest, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Confucius, Education Models | one comment

Postdoc in Non-Western Political Thought

Here is a 2-year postdoc position in Non-Western (Asian) Political Thought at Central European University (details here).  Deadline: Feb 28. 
 
Central European University (CEU) is an English-language, US-accredited graduate university located in Budapest. 
 
The position is offered by the Department of International Relations, but in the context of CEU’s interdepartmental Specialization in Political Thought. If you need more details about this position, please contact Prof. Alexander Astrov: astrova@ceu.hu

January 31, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Comparative Political Theory, Opportunities, Politics | no comments

Latest ISCWP Newsletter

The January 2015 ISCWP Newsletter is available from the society’s website. Among other things, new president XIAO Yang asks for feedback on possible new directions. Take a look! Comments here are also welcome.

January 31, 2015 Posted by | American Philosophical Association, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Organization News | no comments

SBE Interested in Confucian Persepctives

Members of the Society for Business Ethics are keen to add more Confucian (and other non-Western) voices to their conversations. One way to participate would be to submit a paper to their annual meeting; details follow!

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January 29, 2015 Posted by | Call for Papers (CFP), Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy | one comment

2015 AAR CFP

The Call for papers for the next annual meeting of the AAR has just been published. The meeting will be held in Atlanta.  The Confucian Traditions Group leadership would love to see you there.  Here is the Call for papers for the group:
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January 29, 2015 Posted by | Call for Papers (CFP), Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Confucianism, Religion | 2 comments

CFP ASACP Conference 2015

Australasian Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy

ASACP Conference 2015: ASIAN PERSPECTIVES on MIND, ACTION and CULTIVATION

Monash University, Caulfield Campus, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 10-12 July 2015

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January 25, 2015 Posted by | Australia, Call for Papers (CFP), Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy | no comments