Warp, Weft, and Way

Chinese and Comparative Philosophy 中國哲學與比較哲學

New Book: Chinese Metaphysics and Its Problems

A New Book: Chinese Metaphysics and Its Problems, Chenyang Li and Franklin Perkins (eds.), Cambridge University Press (2015). [Amazon link]

Continue reading “New Book: Chinese Metaphysics and Its Problems”

May 21, 2015 Posted by | Books of Interest, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Metaphysics | no comments

Articles on Asian Philosophy in General and Specialist Philosophy Journals, 1940-2014

Numbers and discussion here.

May 20, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Profession | one comment

Call for Papers, Journal of Chinese Humanities

We are now accepting submissions for our next issue, with a focus on the theme “Literature of the Ming and Qing Dynasties.”

Journal of Chinese Humanities (JOCH) is an English-language extension of Wen Shi Zhe (Journal of Literature, History and Philosophy), one of mainland China’s most respected humanities journals. JOCH focuses on presenting scholarly work on various aspects of China’s traditional culture and society. It is our goal to foster international dialogue on important issues in Chinese studies and provide a platform for academic exchange. Continue reading “Call for Papers, Journal of Chinese Humanities”

May 18, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | no comments

New Book: Erin Cline’s Families of Virtue

Erin Cline of Georgetown University has published a new book with Columbia University Press, Families of Virtue: Confucian and Western Views on Childhood Development. Congratulations, Erin! The Columbia U. P. website is here; read on for a description.

Continue reading “New Book: Erin Cline’s Families of Virtue”

May 14, 2015 Posted by | Books of Interest, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Confucianism, Feminism | one comment

WuWei Revisited

Scott Barnwell revisits one of our favorite topics:

Off and on over the past 18 months I’ve been working on a new essay for my blog series “Classical Daoism – Is There Really Such a Thing?” The essay is on Wuwei 無為 and whether it could be considered a defining feature of a group or tradition we call (early) Daoism. I’ve got some thoughts I hope some may feel like addressing. As far as I can tell, wuwei does not have just one meaning or usage. I think there are a few different uses and would like to know if others would differentiate them as I do.

Continue reading “WuWei Revisited”

May 12, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Daodejing, Daoism, Laozi, Taoism | 28 comments

Rewriting the story of philosophy

Via Feminist Philosophers, I learned of this paper by Don Howard, entitled “The History That We Are: Philosophy as Discipline and the Multiculturalism Debate.” A couple of excerpts:

The hypothesis that I want to put forward here is that the conception of the “philosophical” underlying this state of affairs does not correspond to a timeless Platonic form, but that it is instead a construction undertaken in a specific cultural context, at a specific historical moment, for some very specific reasons, not all of which have to do with the love of wisdom. The time is the end of the eighteenth and the beginning of the nineteenth century. The place is northern Europe, chiefly, though not exclusively, Prussia and Hanover.
Continue reading “Rewriting the story of philosophy”

May 12, 2015 Posted by | Comparative philosophy, History, Methodology | one comment

Zhuangzi and Climate Change

Two new articles about the Peng Bird in as many days! Here’s one about a Zhuangzi-inspired art installation at the 56th Venice Biennale. More information on the installation, along with some pictures, here.

May 7, 2015 Posted by | Zhuangzi | no comments

China’s Apolitical Political School of Thought

A new article by Bryan W. Van Norden at The National Interest.

May 7, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Daoism, Political Theory, Zhuangzi | no comments

New Email Subscription Option

For those of you who may have been unceremoniously dropped from your email subscriptions (to new post notifications) when our site underwent a “routine” update a couple of months ago, we have added a different — and more convenient, by Postmatic’s own advertising — subscription service from  on the far right menu.

One of the new features that I haven’t tested yet is the ability to comment directly from the email in which the post is sent. I guess we will find out soon enough.

Sign up if you like emailed updates!

May 6, 2015 Posted by | Blog details | 4 comments

First lecture in new Taiwan series

For those in Taiwan, this lecture on the future of cross-straits relations from a Confucian perspective may be of interest; it is announced as the first in a new series of lectures of Confucian perspectives on contemporary civil society issues):

臺師大東亞學系與鵝湖人文書院共同成立「當代與東亞儒家市民論壇」。定期就當代重大議題邀請傑出學者專家與儒士發表演講,並且進行即席討論。第一場將於五月七日週四晚上召開,歡迎各界參加。
講 題:兩岸關係應如何走
主講人:張亞中(國立台灣大學政治系教授)
時 間:民國一0四年五月七日(週四)晚上七點至九點
地 點:臺灣師大誠正勤樸大樓的九樓政治學研究所多
    功能會議廳(台北市和平東路一段162號

May 6, 2015 Posted by | China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Politics, Taiwan | no comments

Postdoctoral Fellowships 2016: UNSW, Sydney, Australia

This is a highly competitive fellowship with a generous stipend. Scholars who have been awarded their PhDs after January 2011, or who are expecting the award of their degree imminently, are eligible to apply: UNSW Vice Chancellor’s postdoctoral research fellowships

Applicants should have publications in peer-reviewed scholarly journals and with reputable publishers. They should also discuss future publishing plans. The application pack is available here: UNSW Postdoc Application Pack

If you have questions about a post-doc fellowship in Chinese philosophy, please contact A/Prof Karyn Lai (k.lai@unsw.edu.au)

May 5, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | no comments

Events next week in Hong Kong

As I have already mentioned, on Friday May 15, there will be an all-day symposium on Joseph Chan’s book Confucian Perfectionism at HKU. There are at least two other Chinese-philosophy related events taking place next week in Hong Kong (please let me know if you know of others!):

  • On Thursday May 14, David Wong (Duke University) will be speaking on “Moral Beauty” at HKU (Room 966, 9/F, The Jockey Club Tower) at 4:30pm.
  • On Wednesday May 13, I will be speaking on “Varieties of Knowing in Neo-Confucianism” at the Center for East Asian and Comparative Philosophy, HK City University (Conference Room 1, To Yuen Building), 4:00pm.

May 5, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Hong Kong, Lecture | no comments

ACPA Deadline Extended

Dear Colleagues,
We would like to extend the deadline for our CFP for APA Eastern 2016 to May 8. As we mentioned before, – and I’d like to clarify further – though the main theme of the celebration is about methodologies for Chinese and comparative philosophy, we basically welcome papers that deal with any aspects of Chinese and comparative philosophy in general. If you’d like to submit for the DAO special issue for this event, I suppose you will need to clarify the methodology of your study. For the purpose of the ACPA panel, however, this is not an imperative as long as there is a reasonable methodology underlying your research.
Thanks for your attention and all the best,
Huaiyu

May 1, 2015 Posted by | American Philosophical Association, Call for Papers (CFP), Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy | no comments

New Book: Kim, ed., Confucianism, Law and Democracy in Contemporary Korea

Sungmoon Kim, ed., Confucianism, Law and Democracy in Contemporary Korea (Rowman and Littlefield International; CEACOP Series in East Asian Comparative Ethics, Politics and Philosophy of Law) has been published. Congratulations to all involved: it looks terrific!

Continue reading “New Book: Kim, ed., Confucianism, Law and Democracy in Contemporary Korea”

May 1, 2015 Posted by | Books of Interest, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Comparative Political Theory, Confucianism, Contemporary Confucianism, Korea, Law | no comments

2015 Nishan Confucian Studies Summer Institute

2015 Nishan Confucian Studies Summer Institute: International Program for Teachers of Chinese Studies

The International Program for Teachers of Chinese Culture is an invitation to spend a month reading the Confucian classics with world-renowned experts Roger T. Ames, Chenshan Tian and other distinguished comparative philosophy and Confucian scholars at a newly established Confucian academy at the site of Confucius’s birth, career, and death.

Application deadline: June 1, 2015

Continue reading “2015 Nishan Confucian Studies Summer Institute”

May 1, 2015 Posted by | China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Confucianism, Opportunities | no comments

New Book: Cambridge History of Song Dynasty, Part 2

The Cambridge History of China: Volume 5. The Five Dynasties and Sung China, 960–1279 AD, Part 2 has been published. Part 1 contained overviews of each reign; this volume looks at the period topically, including important contributions to the periods intellectual history by Peter Bol and Hoyt Tillman. See “inside the book” with Amazon here.

May 1, 2015 Posted by | Books of Interest, China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Neo-Confucianism | no comments

ISCWP Deadline extended to May 4

The submission deadline for paper or panel proposals to the ISCWP for next year’s Eastern APA has been extended to May 4. The rest of the details can be seen here.

April 30, 2015 Posted by | Call for Papers (CFP), Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Organization News | no comments

New Book: Daoism in Japan

Today seems to be Daoism Day here at Warp, Weft, and Way. A new book:

Daoism in Japan: Chinese traditions and their influence on Japanese religious culture

Edited by Jeffrey L. Richey

Routledge – 2015 – 268 pages

April 28, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Daoism, Japan, Japanese philosophy | one comment

Fun podcast on Daoism

A cool podcast, “Daoism as Liberation from the Chains of Western Philosophy,” by a former student of mine, Jesse Brenner. Check it out!

April 28, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Daoism | no comments

Lecture at Yale tomorrow

Wednesday, April 29, 2015
12:00 PM to 1:30 PM

The Seduction of Daoist Philosophy: What Was Lost on the Way to Understanding the Daoist Religion?

Room 202, Luce Hall, 34 Hillhouse Avenue

James Robson – Professor, Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University

Continue reading “Lecture at Yale tomorrow”

April 28, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Daodejing, Daoism, Lecture | no comments

Symposium on Chan, Confucian Perfectionism

I am looking forward to this workshop on Joseph Chan’s important book, Confucian Perfectionism, to be held at HKU on May 15. Details (and free registration information) here.
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April 27, 2015 Posted by | Books of Interest, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Comparative Political Theory, Conference, Confucianism, Contemporary Confucianism, Hong Kong | no comments

Comment Function Technical Problems

UPDATE: COMMENTS ARE FUNCTIONING AGAIN.

There has been a problem using the comment function. Thank you for your patience while we figure out the issue. We will update when there is progress.

April 26, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | one comment

Ethics in Public Life: Good Practitioners in a Rising Asia

This book by Kenneth Winston may interest some of you:

Ethics in Public Life: Good Practitioners in a Rising Asia

The topic of moral competence is generally neglected in the study of public management and policy, yet it is critical to any hope we might have for strengthening the quality of governance and professional practice. What does moral competence consist of? How is it developed and sustained? These questions are addressed in this book through close examination of selected practitioners in Asian countries making life-defining decisions in their work. The protagonists include a doctor in Singapore, a political activist in India, a mid-level bureaucrat in central Asia, a religious missionary in China, and a journalist in Cambodia—each struggling with ethical challenges that shed light on what it takes to act effectively and well in public life. Together they bear witness to the ideal of public service, exercising their personal gifts for the well-being of others and demonstrating that, even in difficult circumstances, the reflective practitioner can be a force for good.

Kenneth Winston is Lecturer in Ethics at the Harvard Kennedy School, USA and Faculty Chair of the HKS Singapore Program. He is co-editor of Prospects for the Professions in China (2011) and editor of The Principles of Social Order: Selected Essays of Lon L. Fuller (rev. ed., 2001).

For more information see here. Palgrave is also offering a 30% discount on the book through 4/30/2015. Use the coupon code PM15THIRTY.

 

April 24, 2015 Posted by | Books of Interest | no comments

Three New Books

Three new books, all interesting-looking, have recently been published:

April 22, 2015 Posted by | Books of Interest, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy | no comments

CFA: 19th Annual SEECR

We are pleased to announce that the University of Tennessee, Knoxville will host the 19th annual Southeast Early China Roundtable (SEECR), 30 October – 1 November 2015.

We welcome proposals for presentations dealing pre-Song China from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, including anthropology, archaeology, art history, history, literature,  philosophy, and religious studies. Please send a short abstract (250 words) of your proposed presentation and full institutional contact information to <SEECR2015@utk.edu> by 1 August 2015. Early submissions are welcome.

Continue reading “CFA: 19th Annual SEECR”

April 22, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | no comments

CFA: Conference on Metaphors in Use

Call for Abstracts: Metaphors in Use

Third Annual Lehigh University Conference in Philosophy, October 8 & 9, 2015

Keynote Speakers: Elisabeth Camp, Rutgers; Bryan Van Norden, Vassar; Lynne Tirrell, U Mass, Boston

Conference website: < https://philconf.cas2.lehigh.edu/>

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: JUNE 30, 2015

Continue reading “CFA: Conference on Metaphors in Use”

April 22, 2015 Posted by | Call for Papers (CFP), Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Conference | no comments

New Issue of Asian Philosophy published

Asian Philosophy 25:1 is out, available here.  Among other things, it includes Yong Li’s interesting “Adaptionism and Early Confucian Moral Psychology,” which criticizes Ryan Nichols’ earlier effort to provide an evolution-based analysis of Confucian moral psychology.

April 22, 2015 Posted by | Buddhism, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Tables of Contents | no comments

Important Facebook Detail

IMPORTANT: If you rely on Facebook to notify you of posts on Warp Weft and Way and you have “liked” it already, because of the updated format of the page, you will need to go to the page and select “Get Notifications” where it indicates that you already have “Liked” the Facebook page (look on the big picture of the ox). Remarkably, for Facebook, liking the page does not automatically sign you up for receiving notifications from the page.

April 20, 2015 Posted by | Blog details | no comments

Bell on the Challenges of Teaching “Western Values”

Daniel Bell’s latest New York Times op-ed: “Teaching ‘Western Values’ in China” grapples with some of the difficulties with teaching and researching both “Western” and “Chinese” values.

April 20, 2015 Posted by | China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Comparative Political Theory, Politics | no comments

Conference on Oneness in Hong Kong this weekend

International Conference on Oneness in Philosophy and Religion

Date: 25-27 April 2015

Venue: AC1-P4704, City University of Hong Kong

Conference program: http://www6.cityu.edu.hk/ceacop/Oneness/Conference_Oneness.pdf

April 20, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Conference | no comments

New Book: Brooks & Brooks, The Emergence of China

The long-awaited survey of Warring States China by E. Bruce Brooks and A. A. Taeko Brooks, The Emergence of China, has been published and is available for order through the University Press of New England‘s website. It should also be available before long on Amazon. Extracts are available here. Congratulations to Bruce and Taeko!

April 19, 2015 Posted by | Books of Interest, China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | no comments

New Book: Wang, Daoism Excavated

Daoism Excavated: Cosmos and Humanity in Early Manuscripts
by WANG Zhongjiang, translated by Livia Kohn
paperback, 230 pages
bibliography, index
ISBN 978-1-931483-62-9
June 1, 2015

Continue reading “New Book: Wang, Daoism Excavated”

April 19, 2015 Posted by | Books of Interest, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Cosmology, Daoism, Excavated Texts | no comments

CFP: ISCWP at 2016 APA Eastern

The ISCWP plans to sponsor one or two panels at the 2016 APA Eastern Division meeting.
Our Goal: We would like to encourage submissions of proposals of individual papers and panels. We encourage papers or panels that promote in-depth engagement between Chinese and Western philosophy. The submissions will be reviewed by all the three members of the board. When we select papers, we normally try to find papers that have common theme to form a panel. You may have a better chance to be accepted if you submit a panel proposal which already has a common theme.

For this year, we would especially like to encourage submissions to form at least one panel around the broad theme: Continental and Chinese Philosophy. Possible topics may include comparative work on individual figures (Heidegger, Levinas, Deleuze, Irigaray, Confucius, Mencius, Zhuangzi, etc.), topics from within these traditions (Hermeneutics and Chinese Philosophy, etc.), and work on 20th century Chinese philosophical figures such as Mou Zongsan, Tang Junyi, Xiong Shili, Liang Shuming, etc.

Continue reading “CFP: ISCWP at 2016 APA Eastern”

April 19, 2015 Posted by | Call for Papers (CFP), Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, European Continental Philosophy, Organization News | no comments

Bellum vs Zhan 戰: A Comparative Workshop in Early Military Thought

Bellum vs Zhan : A Comparative Workshop in Early Military Thought

Report by:

Steve Jackowicz, Ph.D.

On April 4th 2015 about thirty scholars and students of ancient warfare gathered at Princeton University’s Jones Hall to participate in a day long workshop exploring the differences and similarities between ancient Chinese and Roman conceptions of warfare. Organized by two Princeton graduate students, Mercedes Valmisa & Sara Vantournhout, the workshop brought together two esteemed scholars of disparate parts of the ancient world. Robin McNeal, Cornell University, presented selections from ancient Chinese texts on Righteous War, while Richard Billows, Columbia University, presented selections from Cicero exploring Just War Theory.

Continue reading “Bellum vs Zhan 戰: A Comparative Workshop in Early Military Thought”

April 15, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Conference, Military | no comments

2014 Dao Annual Best Essay Award Announcement

Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy, has been conducting the annual selection of the best essay since 2007. Its editorial board has just completed its deliberation in selecting the best paper published in 2014, and the award winner is Professor Peimin Ni of Grand Valley State University, for his paper, “Seek and You Will Find It; Let Go and You Will Lose It: Exploring a Confucian Approach to Human Dignity” (Dao 13 [2014]: 173-198). Congratulations, Peimin!

Continue reading “2014 Dao Annual Best Essay Award Announcement”

April 15, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Confucianism | 2 comments

11th Annual Midwest Conference on Chinese Thought (Program)

11th Annual Midwest Conference on Chinese Thought

North Central College, Naperville, IL

May 1-2, 2015

Friday, May 1

1:00-2:30  The Virtues of Mengzi (Chair: Aaron Stalnaker)

  • Dobin Choi (State University of New York, Buffalo): “Mengzi’s Maxim on Self-Cultivation for Righteousness in 2A2”
  • John Ramsey (Scripps College): “Are the Fruit of Duan of the Same Species? Mengzian Virtues as Heterogenous”
  • Franklin Perkins (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore): “Five Conducts (Wu xing 五行), Mengzi, and the Way of Heaven”

2:30-2:45  Break

Continue reading “11th Annual Midwest Conference on Chinese Thought (Program)”

April 10, 2015 Posted by | Conference | one comment

Facebook Page Update

Just a quick update about the Facebook page that is associated with the blog. The page has been converted (finally) to a public page rather than being a “personal” profile page. That increases its functionality for being linked automatically to the blog’s posts. Discussions can also be started on the Facebook page by anyone who wishes to post there. Posts are moderated — they have to be approved by an administrator before appearing.

Note: some of you who were following the Facebook page were dropped off the list in the transition. Please “like” the page again to resume following. Cheers.

April 9, 2015 Posted by | Blog details | no comments

Discussion of Slote’s “Reset Button”

The article from the current issue of Dao that we have chosen for discussion is Michael Slote’s “The Philosophical Reset Button: A Manifesto,” available via open-access here. This time around, we offer opening comments from both BAI Tongdong of Fudan University, and myself (Steve Angle). Those comments follow here, and let the discussion begin!

Continue reading “Discussion of Slote’s “Reset Button””

April 9, 2015 Posted by | China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Dao Article Discussion, Emotions | 11 comments

Statistics on Asian Philosophy Panels at the 2015 Pacific APA

This last Saturday evening, I was carping to a colleague about the fact that three panels on Chinese philosophy were scheduled simultaneously during the very last time slot of the Group Program of the Pacific APA. Now that the APA has distributed a link to the evaluation survey, I decided to take a look at the actual numbers to see if there is a genuine issue of equity at the conference.

Below are the stats that I got from a first-time run-through of the main and group programs (I’m concerned with Asian philosophy broadly, which I categorized, following the panel titles or society names, as Chinese, Buddhist, Japanese, Comparative, and Martial Arts (didn’t see Indian, alas!)).

Continue reading “Statistics on Asian Philosophy Panels at the 2015 Pacific APA”

April 6, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Indian Philosophy, Japanese philosophy | 2 comments

New Book: Ethics in Public Life in Asia

Kenneth Winston of Harvard’s Kennedy School writes:

I am pleased to announce the publication of my book “Ethics in Public Life:  Good Practitioners in a Rising Asia” from Palgrave Macmillan.  The book is a set of five case studies of practitioners in different Asian countries making life-defining decisions in their work.  They include a doctor in Singapore, a political activist in India, a mid-level bureaucrat in central Asia, a religious missionary in China, and a journalist in Cambodia—each struggling with ethical challenges that shed light on what it takes to act effectively and well in public life.

Continue reading “New Book: Ethics in Public Life in Asia”

April 4, 2015 Posted by | Books of Interest, China, Confucianism, Virtue | no comments

April 3 Neo-Confucianism Seminar

The next session of the Columbia University Seminar on Neo-Confucian Studies will convene Friday, April 3, 2015 from 3:30 to 5:30pm in the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University. Chi-keung Chan 陳志強, a Ph.D candidate at The Chinese University of Hong Kong who is currently a Fulbright Visiting Scholar at Boston University, will present the paper “A Confucian Theory of Immorality: From Classical Confucianism to Neo-Confucianism.”   The main paper is in Chinese and is titled 《陽明與蕺山過惡思想的理論關聯-廉論「一滾說」的理論意涵》.   Copies of the paper, as well as an English summary and some additional recent work on that subject in English by the presenter, are available from the organizers. All are welcome to attend.  If you have any questions, contact one of our organizers: Ari Borrell (aborrell@msn.com), Tao Jiang (tjiang@rci.rutgers.edu), or Deborah Sommer (dsommer@gettysburg.edu).

March 28, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Confucianism, Neo-Confucianism, Wang Yangming | no comments

Major Update to Chinese Text Project

News from Donald Sturgeon, who has used optical character recognition to provide extraordinary searchable access to pre-modern Chinese texts online:

Chinese Text Project: over ten million pages of pre-modern Chinese texts now searchable online

A major update to the site has been made by applying OCR to over ten million pages of transmitted texts stored in the Library, linking scanned texts where possible to digital editions that follow them. Over 3000 existing texts have been successfully linked, allowing side-by-side display and textual searching of scanned texts.

Additionally, around ten thousand new texts and editions have also been transcribed for the first time using OCR. While these transcriptions inevitably contain many errors, they make it possible for the first time to search the scanned texts and immediately locate information within them. All newly transcribed texts have been added to the Wiki – please help by correcting errors when using these resources.

For further details, please see the OCR instructions.

March 26, 2015 Posted by | Chinese Texts, Databases, Resources | one comment

CFP: ISCP at 2016 Eastern APA

International Society for Chinese Philosophy (ISCP) plans to host two sessions at the 2016 Eastern Division Meeting of American Philosophical Association (APA) on January 6-9 at the Wardman Park Marriott in Washington D.C. You are invited to submit a panel proposal or a paper abstract.

Continue reading “CFP: ISCP at 2016 Eastern APA”

March 26, 2015 Posted by | American Philosophical Association, Call for Papers (CFP), Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Organization News | no comments

Penn Workshop on Non-Western Philosophical Traditions

This Friday there is a workship on non-Western philosophical traditions at Penn, co-sponsored by the philosophy department. It’s a shame this wasn’t publicized more, but here is the schedule for anyone who is interested. Continue reading “Penn Workshop on Non-Western Philosophical Traditions”

March 23, 2015 Posted by | Academia | one comment

Philosophy, Culture, and Public Life

A reflection by Rasmus Grønfeldt Winther (UC-Santa Cruz).

March 22, 2015 Posted by | Comparative philosophy | no comments

Pennsylvania Asian Studies Conference Upcoming

2015 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ASIAN STUDIES: BRINGING THE WORLD TO NORTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA
March 28 – 29, 2015, The University of Scranton, Pennsylvania, USA

Website
Press coverage

March 19, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Conference | no comments

New issue of Dao out / New article discussion upcoming

The latest issue of Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy has been published. We will continue our series of sponsoring discussion of an article from each issue; this time, we have chosen Michael Slote’s “The Philosophical Reset Button: A Manifesto.” It will be set to open-access, and within a week or so we will have a post announcing that the discussion is open. To whet your appetite, here is the abstract:

Continue reading “New issue of Dao out / New article discussion upcoming”

March 18, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Confucianism, Dao Article Discussion, Emotions, Profession | no comments

ACPA Newsletter

The 2015 ACPA Newsletter has been published, and can be accessed via their website at: http://www.acpa-net.org/news.html.

March 18, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Organization News | no comments

NECCT 4 Call for Abstracts

We hereby request submissions of abstracts for the Fourth Northeast Conference on Chinese Thought (NECCT), to be held at Southern Connecticut State University on Saturday and Sunday, November 7-8, 2015.

Interested scholars should send an abstract of no more than one single-spaced page, plus a current CV, to Tom Radice (radicet1@southernct.edu) and Xiaomei Yang (yangx1@southernct.eduno later than June 1, 2015. All files should either be in Word or .pdf format.

Continue reading “NECCT 4 Call for Abstracts”

March 18, 2015 Posted by | Call for Papers (CFP), Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Conference | no comments

MARKUS: A great tool for classical Chinese texts

MARKUS is an on-line tool that allows users to upload a file in classical Chinese and tag personal namesplace namestemporal references, and bureaucratic offices automatically, and that’s just for starters. It looks powerful and helpful; check it out here. Hilde de Weerdt describes some recent updates to MARKUS here.

March 15, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Resources | one comment

NEH and SEP

I recently received a letter from the editors of the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (SEP), suggesting that those who have benefitted from the NEH’s support for SEP might tell the nEH this, as part of the 50th anniversary of the NEH. Given SEP’s openness to non-Western philosophy, I thought this idea was a good one, and wanted to share the letter here, and encourage others to write to NEH as well!

Continue reading “NEH and SEP”

March 14, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Profession | one comment

New MOOC on Confucianism

Prof. Alan Chan of Nanyang Technological University in Singapore is currently working on a six-week MOOC on Confucian Philosophy. The course is now open for registration on Coursera, and will begin on 28 Sep 2015. More details of the MOOC can be found here: https://www.coursera.org/course/ntucp.

March 14, 2015 Posted by | Analects, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Confucianism, On-line courses | no comments

APA Pacific Commentator Needed

Due to some unexpected conflicts, the ACPA now needs another commentator for one of its sessions at APA Pacific 2015 (G7B: Ethics and Meaning of Life in Confuican and Daoist Philosophy, April 3, Friday evening 7-10pm). The paper is: Sean Drysdale Walsh (University of Minnesota Duluth), “Mencius and Aristotle on the Negative Duty to Flourish.” If anyone would be interested in commentating Prof. Walsh’s paper, please contact Huaiyu Wang as soon as possible.

March 14, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Conference, Organization News | no comments

NECCT 4 Information

The 4th Northeast Conference on Chinese Thought (NECCT) will be held on November 7 – 8, 2015 at Southern Connecticut State University in New Haven, CT. It will be co-sponsored with Yale’s Center for East Asian Studies and Wesleyan’s College of East Asian Studies. Expect an official call for abstracts in the near future.

March 11, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Conference | no comments

Weingarten review of Dissertation on Motherhood in Early China

Oliver Weingarten’s review of Smadar Winter’s University of Chicago Ph.D. dissertation, “Motherhood in Early China,” is available online. A couple highlights (from the review, not the dissertation itself):

  • “…An example of her disagreement with earlier scholarship is her response to attempts by Catherine Despeux and Livia Kohn to highlight the “prominence of motherhood” in the Laozi 老子. Winter counters this claim with a well-conceived alternative reading that argues for the secondary importance of motherhood in the text.”
  • “…In her conclusion, Winter revisits debates about two paradigms in the gender history of early China: “woman as victim” and “woman as agent.” While she acknowledges the importance of the latter, she reminds her readers that “women’s agency was always defined in the service of male interests.” (p. 215) To acknowledge this is crucial so as to not to forget the “forms of oppression from which early Chinese women have suffered.” Consequently, Winter argues against “a neutral-to-positive tone which seems to be saying: Yes, there was oppression, but women were still able to lead meaningful lives and fulfill their humanity in the roles that subordinated them.” (p. 216)”

March 11, 2015 Posted by | China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Comparative Political Theory, Gender | no comments

Sung in NDPR on Hutton’s Xunzi

Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews

2015.03.16 View this Review Online   View Other NDPR Reviews

Xunzi, XunziThe Complete Text, Eric L. Hutton (tr.), Princeton University Press, 2014, xxxi+ 397pp., $39.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780691161044.

Reviewed by Winnie Sung, Nanyang Technological University

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March 11, 2015 Posted by | Book Review, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Confucianism, Translation, Xunzi | no comments

David Elstein – Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy Lecture: “The Possibility of a Confucian Doctrine of Free Expression”, Mar. 27 @5:30pm

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes: DAVID ELSTEIN (SUNY New Paltz)
With responses from: WARREN FRISINA (Hofstra University)

Please join at Columbia University’s Religion Department on FRIDAY, MARCH 27 5:30PM for his lecture entitled:

The Possibility of a Confucian Doctrine of Free Expression

ABSTRACT: Most contemporary New Confucian advocates for democracy take a robust right of free expression for granted as a necessary condition for democratic practice. Yet whether or how Confucianism can justify such a right is often passed over without much analysis. On the face of it, the case does not look good. Classical Confucians of course do not mention any such right, and what they do say is generally neutral or outright hostile to free expression. Various limitations on free expression have also been endorsed by later Confucians, including some contemporary thinkers. The usual liberal justifications of free expression as protecting individual autonomy and preserving access to truth probably will not work for Confucians. For one thing, autonomy is not valued in the same way as in liberalism. Second, Confucians have generally been confident that truth and falsehood can be reliably distinguished by the more enlightened and there is not much to be gained by allowing the persistence of obviously false doctrines. The bigger concern is the harm false doctrines can cause. In this paper I will examine Confucian opposition to free expression, where Confucians will disagree with liberal views, and consider whether Confucianism can justify free expression along with how the Confucian right may differ in application. Continue reading “David Elstein – Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy Lecture: “The Possibility of a Confucian Doctrine of Free Expression”, Mar. 27 @5:30pm”

March 10, 2015 Posted by | Comparative philosophy, Confucianism, Lecture | 7 comments

CFP: Conference at Bond University, Australia

The deadline is coming soon for proposals for this event…

International Symposium:  Confucianism and Modern Society

Bond University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.

14/15th May 2015

Call for proposals

Confucianism was founded by Confucius (551-479 BCE), a great thinker and educator in China. As a way of life and a body of thought, it has evolved for two and a half millennia. The vitality of this school of thought, with its emphasis on such key virtues as benevolence, tolerance and reciprocity, has persisted to the present time.

Will the vitality of the Confucian tradition serve and advance modern society? 

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March 10, 2015 Posted by | Call for Papers (CFP), Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Confucianism | no comments

Philosophy Meets Cultural Diversity, 13-14 March 2015 at University of Pittsburgh

This conference should be of interest to anyone working on issues in comparative thought and philosophy. A terrific lineup of speakers and panelists (if I do say so myself). -HS

Over the last decade, the newly emerging field of “experimental philosophy” has posed a challenge to the claim that professional philosophers’ judgments about philosophically important thought experiments are universal. Rather, in a growing number of studies, it has been shown that people in different cultural groups – Asians and Westerners, males and females, people of high and low socio-economic status, people with different personality types, people of different ages, people with different native languages, etc. – have different intuitions about cases designed to explore what people think about knowledge, morality, free will, consciousness and other important philosophical issues. However, the extent and sources of this variation remain by and large unknown. The goal of this conference is to bring together anthropologists, psychologists, comparative philosophers, and experimental philosophers in order to further our understanding of the similarities and differences in the lay understanding of, on the one hand, knowledge, and, on the other, agency and person across cultures. Furthermore, we hope to sketch new avenues of research for philosophically sophisticated cross-cultural studies of the concepts of knowledge, person, and agency.

Invited Speakers
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March 8, 2015 Posted by | Comparative philosophy, Conference, Epistemology, Moral Psychology, Psychology, The Self | one comment

New Book: The Philosophical Challenge from China

A new book full of specially written essays that aim to bring out ways in which Chinese philosophy can fruitfully challenge contemporary Western (especially analytic) philosophy, The Philosophical Challenge from China, edited by Brian Bruya, is about to be published by MIT Press. More information is here, and I will repeat the publisher’s description here. Congratulations, Brian!

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March 7, 2015 Posted by | Books of Interest, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy | 3 comments