Warp, Weft, and Way

Chinese and Comparative Philosophy 中國哲學與比較哲學

The relational self, and the value of comparative philosophy

An article by Julian Baggini, the latest entry in the New York Times’ “Stone” column.

February 9, 2016 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | one comment

New Book on Wang Yangming

I have just started reading Larry Israel’s book Doing Good and Ridding Evil in Ming China: The Political Career of Wang Yangming (Brill, 2014), and it looks excellent. Larry posted something about it on the Readers’ Discussion section of the site, but it deserves a main post!

February 5, 2016 Posted by | Books of Interest, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Neo-Confucianism, Politics, Wang Yangming | one comment

Rosenlee Reviews Rosemont, Against Individualism

Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews

2016.02.02 View this Review Online   View Other NDPR Reviews

Henry Rosemont Jr., Against Individualism: A Confucian Rethinking of the Foundations of Morality, Politics, Family, and Religion, Lexington Books, 2015, 190pp., $85.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780739199800.

Reviewed by Li-Hsiang Lisa Rosenlee, University of Hawaii, West Oahu

This book has ten chapters and can be roughly divided into two parts: the first five chapters focus on the discussion of many problematics of the Western notion of individualism; and the second half is devoted to the Confucian role-based alternative. This book can be seen as a culmination of Henry Rosemont Jr.’s decades of work in the field of comparative philosophy. His critique of Western individualism along with his search for Confucian spirituality as an alternative stretches back to his early works such as A Chinese Mirror: Moral Reflections on Political Economy and Society (Open Court, 1991), “Human Rights: A Bill of Worries” (in Confucianism and Human Rights, Columbia University Press, 1998) and Rationality and Religious Experience: The Continuing Relevance of the World’s Spiritual Traditions (Open Court 2001). Against Individualism is a natural progression of all these early groundworks that Rosemont has laid along the way.

Continue reading “Rosenlee Reviews Rosemont, Against Individualism”

February 5, 2016 Posted by | Book Review, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Confucianism, Politics | 2 comments

CFP Journal of Chinese Humanities

We are now accepting submissions for our next issue with a focus on the theme “Early Confucian Thought.” All entries must be original works and will be peer reviewed.

Journal of Chinese Humanities (JOCH) is an English-language extension of Wen Shi Zhe (文史哲 Journal of Literature, History and Philosophy), one of mainland China’s most respected humanities journals. JOCH focuses on presenting original scholarly work on various aspects of China’s traditional culture and society. It is our goal to foster international dialogue on important issues in Chinese studies and provide a platform for academic exchange.

The deadline for submissions is February 16, 2016. Submissions should be in English, use Chicago Style format and be between 6,000 and 10,000 words in length.

Please send submissions and questions to joch@sdu.edu.cn .

 

Ben Hammer

Journal of Chinese Humanities

Shandong University

February 2, 2016 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | one comment

FPC Journal Welcomes Submissions

Frontiers of Philosophy in China (FPC) is an international philosophical quarterly, founded in 2006. It is has been published by both Brill and Higher Education Press since 2011.

Frontiers of Philosophy in China (FPC) aims to disseminate new scholarly achievements in the field of broadly defined philosophy, and to promote philosophical research of the highest level by publishing peer-reviewed academic articles that facilitate communication and cooperation among philosophers in China and abroad. The journal covers nearly all the main branches of philosophy, with priority given to original works on Chinese philosophy and to comparative studies between Chinese philosophy and other types of philosophy in the world.

FPC welcomes your submissions. For more information, please see here.

January 27, 2016 Posted by | Call for Papers (CFP), China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Journal News | no comments

New Book: Eichman on Late Ming

Jennifer Eichman’s important study of late-Ming thought and practice is about to be published:

A Late Sixteenth-Century Chinese Buddhist Fellowship: Spiritual Ambitions, Intellectual Debates, and Epistolary Connections (Brill, 2016)

For more details, see here. Congratulations, Jennifer!

January 27, 2016 Posted by | Books of Interest, Buddhism, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Neo-Confucianism | no comments

Two New Books

Two recent books of interest:

Sun, Zhenbin, Language, Discourse, and Praxis in Ancient China (Springer, 2015)

King, R.A.H., ed., The Good Life and Conceptions of Life in Early China and Graeco-Roman Antiquity (De Gruyter, 2015)

 

January 27, 2016 Posted by | Books of Interest, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy | no comments

Interviews about East Asian Studies Books

The website New Books in East Asian Studies posts lovely interviews with the authors of, you guessed it, new books in East Asian Studies, some of which fall into our collective areas of interest. Check it out!

January 27, 2016 Posted by | Books of Interest, China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | no comments

Teach Yourself Classical Chinese

I have recently become aware of Mark Edward Lewis’s on-line classical Chinese course. Looks valuable!

January 27, 2016 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Chinese Texts, Pedagogy | 2 comments

CFP: AAR Confucian Traditions Group

Confucian Traditions Group

Statement of Purpose:
This Group is committed to the study of the diversity of religious traditions associated with Confucius and his followers, including areas where Confucian thought and practice intersect with those of other traditions. The Group embraces historical, philosophical, and dialogical approaches, and is not located in any single country or discipline.

Call for Papers:
This Group invites proposals concerning any aspect of Confucianism from any geographical area in any historical field with any methodological orientation.

For more details, including topics of particular interest and whom to contact, please see this webpage.

January 27, 2016 Posted by | Call for Papers (CFP), Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Confucianism, Religion | no comments

Huang Invites Comments on the “Double Bind” and Chinese Philosophy

Prof. Yong HUANG of the Chinese University of Hong Kong has posted an advance version of a short article entitled “The ‘Double Bind’ on Specialists in Chinese Philosophy” on his Academia.edu site, and invites readers to take part in the discussion that has begun there. Access is freely available (though you may need to create an Academia.edu account, fi you don’t already have one) here. Please also feel free to comment here as well.

January 25, 2016 Posted by | American Philosophical Association, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Profession | no comments

El Amine to Northwestern

Loubna El Amine, who earned her PhD from the Department of Politics at Princeton and has been teaching (comparative) political theory at Georgretown, has recently accepted an offer to move to Northwestern University, starting in Fall 2016. Congratulations, Loubna!

January 22, 2016 Posted by | Comparative Political Theory, Profession | no comments

New Reviews in The China Journal

The latest issue of The China Journal has some book reviews that will interest many:

  • Review Essay: Modernity and the Chinese Moral Crisis, by Andrew B. Kipnis (reviewing Moral China in the Age of Reform, by Jiwei Ci; and The Stranger and the Chinese Moral Imagination, by Haiyan Lee.)
  • Bryce Kositz reviews Politics and Traditional Culture: The Political Use of Traditions in Contemporary China, by Janette Ai (Singapore: World Scientific, 2015).
  • Vanessa L. Fong reviews Ordinary Ethics in China, edited by Charles Stafford (London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2013).

January 22, 2016 Posted by | Book Review, China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Politics | no comments

Hutton Reviews El Amine, Classical Confucian Political Thought

Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews

2016.01.17 View this Review Online   View Other NDPR Reviews

Loubna El Amine, Classical Confucian Political Thought: A New Interpretation, Princeton University Press, 2015, 218pp., $39.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780691163048.

Reviewed by Eric L. Hutton, University of Utah

This book’s subtitle, A New Interpretation, provides a convenient starting point for discussing its aims, methods, strengths and weaknesses. The interpretation offered aims to be new not merely in the sense that it argues for a view that previously has not (or not much) been defended by other scholars, but moreover and especially in that it aims to challenge claims made by other scholars. So described, the book might sound like it is primarily for specialists in ancient Chinese thought, and while Loubna El Amine never identifies her target audience very clearly, at points she also provides basic background information that would allow non-specialists to follow along. The book is thus potentially of interest to non-specialists as well, such as Western political philosophers and theorists who know little about Confucian political thought and want a compact and accessible discussion of Confucianism that speaks to their interests. This review will focus on those aspects in which the book addresses a specialist audience, but my discussion is equally for the benefit of non-specialists. As will become apparent from the reservations I express below, the value of the book for non-specialists needs to be carefully qualified, in a way to be explained at the end.

Continue reading “Hutton Reviews El Amine, Classical Confucian Political Thought”

January 21, 2016 Posted by | Book Review, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Comparative Political Theory, Confucianism | one comment

CFP: 48th Annual SACP Conference

Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy
48th Annual Conference
June 2-5, 2016
East-West Center, University of Hawai’i, Manoa

CONFERENCE THEME: “IMAGINATION”

Keynote Speaker: Professor Lawrence McCrea, Cornell University
Title of Keynote Presentation: “Other People’s Philosophy: Imagination and Identity”

Deadline for Abstracts and Proposals: Feb 1, 2016

Continue reading “CFP: 48th Annual SACP Conference”

January 20, 2016 Posted by | Call for Papers (CFP), Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Conference, Organization News | no comments

CFP: Bath Spa University Conference on Identity, East and West

CALL FOR PAPERS: Second Annual Bath Spa University Colloquium for Global Philosophy and Religion

Difference in Identity, East and West

29-30 April, 2016, Bath Spa University, Bath, UK

Continue reading “CFP: Bath Spa University Conference on Identity, East and West”

January 19, 2016 Posted by | Call for Papers (CFP), Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Conference | no comments

2nd Annual MAP-Penn Non-western Philosophy Conference

2nd Annual MAP-Penn Non-western Philosophy Conference

February 26-27, 2016

University of Pennsylvania

Continue reading “2nd Annual MAP-Penn Non-western Philosophy Conference”

January 19, 2016 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Conference | no comments

Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy – Spring 2016 Speakers

We are excited to share with you our upcoming lineup of speakers:

February 26: Joshua Mason (West Chester University)

March 18: Harvey Lederman (NYU)

April 8: Shigenori Nagatomo (Temple University)

April 29: Sara McClintock (Emory University)

We will provide more information regarding the topic of each speaker’s presentation as the semester progresses. We hope to see you all at what promises to be a semester of discussion and engagement.

Inquiries should be directed to one of the following individuals:

Co-Chairs
Professor Jonathan Gold
Associate Professor, Princeton University, Department of Religion
jcgold@princeton.edu

Professor Hagop Sarkissian
Associate Professor, The City University of New York, Baruch College, Department of Philosophy
hagop.sarkissian@baruch.cuny.edu

Rapporteur
Daniel M. del Nido
dmd2167@columbia.edu

January 17, 2016 Posted by | Comparative philosophy, Lecture | no comments

CFP Techniques for Teaching Comparatively

 

Society for Teaching Comparative Philosophy
Call for Papers for a Panel at the American Association of Philosophy Teachers
Saginaw Valley State University
Saginaw, Michigan
July 27–31, 2016

One of the founding goals of the Society for Teaching Comparative Philosophy is to help non-
specialists integrate comparative resources into their classrooms. To help further this goal, we’d like to
organize a panel at this summer’s American Association of Philosophy Teachers’ Workshop/Conference
at Saginaw Valley State University, July 27th -31st. We’re looking for your help in sharing the importance
of comparative resources in the introductory classroom!

We are looking for proposals involving a unit from your introductory courses that is comparative. In
addition, to speak to all of our colleagues, we would like a panel that represents the breadth of
philosophical activity across analytic, continental, and historical methodologies. These approaches can be
text-based, problem-based, and involve any pedagogical styles you are currently using.

Please send your abstract (350 word max), including name, affiliation, a brief description of the unit, and
the methodologies it fits in to a.b.creller@unf.edu by February 10th . The conference website and
information can be found at http://philosophyteachers.org/extended-deadline-cfp-2016/ and information
about the Society for Teaching Comparative Philosophy can be found at stcp.weebly.com.

January 16, 2016 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | 4 comments

The most cross-cultural APA ever?

The upcoming 2016 APA Pacific will feature sessions on Chinese Philosophy of Language; Contemporary Latin American Philosophy; Jonardon Ganeri’s The Self: Naturalism, Consciousness, and the First-person Stance; The Moral Significance of Shame and Disgust: Chinese and Western Perspectives; Trends in Brazilian Epistemology; Confucianism and Neo-Confucianism; Comparing Chinese and Korean Philosophies; Contemporary Indigenous Philosophy; Paradox in Contradiction in East Asian Philosophy; Confucianism; Cultural Evolution; and Barry Allen’s Vanishing into Things . . .

. . . and that is just on the main program!

Continue reading “The most cross-cultural APA ever?”

January 16, 2016 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | one comment

Fudan Programs in Chinese Philosophy

I again offer some information from Prof. Tongdong BAI on Fudan University’s English-language Chinese philosophy programs. There has been discussion of these programs on the blog in the past; search for “Fudan.” 

Thanks to your support, since it was launched in 2011, the MA and Visiting programs in Chinese philosophy (with courses taught in English) at Fudan have been extremely successful. 55 students have been enrolled in either the M.A. program (47 students) and the visiting student program (8 students). They are from the U.S., Canada, Puerto Rico, the U.K., Sweden, the Netherlands, Denmark, Germany, Spain, Italy, Ireland, Poland, Yugoslavia, Romania, Israel, India, and Indonesia, and many of them are top students in their classes, majoring in philosophy, classics, and/or East Asian or Chinese studies. The above facts make these programs simply the most successful of their kind (English-based post-graduate programs in Chinese philosophy) in mainland China.

Continue reading “Fudan Programs in Chinese Philosophy”

January 14, 2016 Posted by | China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Graduate study, Opportunities | no comments

Vaidya on the Inclusion Problem in Philosophy; and Call for More Discussion

The APA has launched a blog about the profession and practice of philosophy, and Anand Vaidya, Director of the Center for Comparative Philosophy at San Jose State University, has posted two discussions concerning the inclusion (or lack thereof) of non-Western philosophy in philosophy curricula and courses.

In addition, the APA blog is interested in more posts on inclusivity in philosophy. If you would like to submit a contribution, they’d love to hear from you.  Please contact them via the submission form here.

January 14, 2016 Posted by | American Philosophical Association, Comparative philosophy, Pedagogy, Profession | no comments

Update to MARKUS Chinese text analysis platform

Hilde De Weerdt writes: A belated new year present for all who work with classical Chinese texts.

The MARKUS platform has gone through a major update during the past few months. You can now create an account, upload content, add customized tags and comments and notes of different kinds, select which reference sites you want to display, convert Chinese to western dates, and, last but not least, import text directly from your ctext.org account. We have added new videos to show most of these features under “HowTo.” More will be added and Chinese translations of these will be added as well.

Continue reading “Update to MARKUS Chinese text analysis platform”

January 14, 2016 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Chinese Texts, Resources | no comments

Bai Review Bell, The China Model

Bai Tongdong of Fudan University has review Daniel Bell’s The China Model: Political Meritocracy and the Limits of Democracy (Princeton University Press, 2015) at NDPR. Read on for the link and for the full review.

Continue reading “Bai Review Bell, The China Model”

January 14, 2016 Posted by | Book Review, China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative Political Theory, Politics | no comments

“What Makes Us Human?” Summer Course at CEU

Applications are invited for an interdisciplinary, comparative summer course entitled “What Makes Us Human? Philosophical and Religious Perspectives in China and the West” to be held at Central European University in Budapest from July 4 to 15. The course looks at the question of what it is to be human from a range of intellectual perspectives in traditional Chinese and Greek thought, covering philosophy, psychology, religion, science, and medicine.

The course director is Curie Virág
 (East Asian Studies, Toronto), and faculty include Gabor Betegh
 (Classics, Christ’s College, Cambridge University), Chris Fraser
 (Philosophy, Hong Kong), Donald Harper
 (East Asian Languages & Civilizations, Chicago), Brooke Holmes
 (Classics, Princeton), Maria Kronfeldner
 (Philosophy, CEU), and Matthias Riedl
 (History, CEU).

Here’s the course description from the program catalogue:  Continue reading ““What Makes Us Human?” Summer Course at CEU”

January 11, 2016 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Courses | 3 comments

12th Annual Midwest Conference on Chinese Thought CFP (Extended)

12th Annual Midwest Conference on Chinese Thought
The University of Chicago
March 11-12, 2016

The Midwest Conference on Chinese Thought was created to foster dialogue and interaction between scholars and students working on Chinese thought across different disciplines and through a variety of approaches. Submissions are invited for papers on any aspect of Chinese thought, as well as papers dealing with comparative issues that engage Chinese perspectives.

This year’s conference will be held on Friday, March 11 and Saturday, March 12 at the University of Chicago. Our keynote speaker will be Chad Hansen, Chair Professor of Chinese Philosophy Emeritus at the University of Hong Kong.

Professor Hansen will discuss classical Chinese ethical naturalism, which elaborates dao (ways, paths) as its focal normative metaphor. Extending his career-long argument that Daoist texts ground normativity in emergent natural contexts, he will present a broadly Zhuangist response to the is-ought problem and moral anti-realism. Modern science does not dispel the mystery of natural ways, but only demarcates more clearly their boundaries. Natural ways include normatively-laden social practices, and seeing those practices as part of nature does not rule out our finding, choosing, constructing and following them correctly. Such a stance does render normative relativism likely and skepticism a constant threat, but this fact need neither paralyze us nor undermine our free and easy pursuit of dao in a rich and complex natural context.

Please submit a 1-page abstract to Stephen Walker at scwalker@uchicago.edu by January 15, 2016 for blind review. For more information, visit the conference website here.

January 8, 2016 Posted by | Call for Papers (CFP) | no comments

Review of Ziporyn’s Books on Coherence

My review of Brook Ziporyn’s two-volume study of Chinese philosophy through the lens of “coherence” has now been published, and should be available to those with access to Dao. Here’s the first paragraph of the review:

Continue reading “Review of Ziporyn’s Books on Coherence”

January 7, 2016 Posted by | Book Review, Buddhism, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Confucianism, Daoism | 4 comments

Confucian Academy 孔学堂

The Confucian Academy (孔学堂) in Guiyang is a recently founded but flourishing enterprise with multiple dimensions, including a scholarly publishing arm. They have begun publishing a bilingual journal (all articles appear in both Chinese and English), and I attach the table of contents here. The Academy’s website is here.

孔学堂1

January 2, 2016 Posted by | China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Confucianism, Journal News | 5 comments

New Book: Meditation and Culture

The book Meditation and Culture: The Interplay of Practice and Context has been published by Bloomsbury Academic.

Continue reading “New Book: Meditation and Culture”

January 2, 2016 Posted by | Books of Interest, Buddhism, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Confucianism, Daoism, Neo-Confucianism | no comments

Shaughnessy on Excavated Texts at Wisconsin

Edward Shaughnessy (University of Chicago) who will be Halls-Bascom Visiting Fellow at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in early April 2016 will hold a Workshop on Recently Excavated Texts on 7 April 2016 from 2:30-4:30 p.m. (location on the UW Campus still to be arranged). Zhi Chen (Hong Kong Baptist University) will serve as discussant. It is hoped that scholars from other “neighboring universities” will consider joining the Workshop. Although we have no travel funds, there will be a light-dinner reception following the Workshop to allow the discussion to continue into the evening. For further information please contact Bill Nienhauser (whnienha@wisc.edu).

January 2, 2016 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Chinese Texts, Excavated Texts, Lecture | no comments

ISCWP Panels at Eastern APA

The ISCWP website has been updated with details about the panels the organization is sponsoring at the upcoming APA conference; see here.

January 2, 2016 Posted by | American Philosophical Association, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Conference, Organization News | no comments

ACPA Reception and Panels at Eastern APA

Invitation for ACPA Panels at APA Eastern 2016 and Celebration Reception for the 20th Anniversary of ACPA and 15th Anniversary of DAO

(Featuring a Special Talk: How to Publish in the Journal of DAO, by the Editor-in-Chief Dr. Huang Yong)

The Association of Chinese Philosophers in America (ACPA) would like to invite your participation in our three panels at APA Eastern 2016 below, and in particular our reception for the 20th Anniversary of ACPA and the 15th Anniversary of DAO. (See here for the reception flyer.)

The reception will be hosted at Marriott Ballroom Balcony B at the Mezzanine Level on Jan. 7, 5:15-6:30 pm. All are invited to come:

  • Appetizers & Drinks
  • A chance to chat with members and friends of ACPA.
  • A Special Talk by Dr. Huang Yong (City University of Hong Kong) on the achievement of Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy and some tips and guidelines on how to have your work published in the journal

Registration for the reception is note required. Food and Drink are on first come first serve basis. Please feel free to contact Huaiyu Wang (wdhyana@gmail.com) for more information.

Continue reading “ACPA Reception and Panels at Eastern APA”

December 31, 2015 Posted by | American Philosophical Association, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Conference, Organization News | no comments

Translation of Gongyang Commentary

Palgrave Macmillan has published Harry Miller’s complete translation of The Gongyang Commentary on the Spring and Autumn Annals. It is available as hardcover or eBook. The publisher’s description follows; check out the website for preview access to some of the book.

Continue reading “Translation of Gongyang Commentary”

December 23, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Chinese Texts, Translation | no comments

Bin Song Blogging at Huff Post

Bin Song, who holds a PhD in Western philosophy from Nankai University and is currently pursuing a PhD in Religious Studies at Boston University, has begun a series of blog posts in the Huffington Post under the general title, “A Catechism of Confucianism.” As he explains there, “as a Buddhist-Christian Confucian, the primary focus of Bin Song’s spiritual and academic life is to increase the relevance of traditional Confucianism to the contemporary global human society through a on-going dialogue with ordinary people, a variety of philosophical traditions, and non-Confucian world religions.”

December 23, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Confucianism, Contemporary Confucianism, Related Blog Discussions, Religion | no comments

Experimental Philosophy Through History – February 2, 2016 at NYU

Many of you know me as a scholar of Chinese philosophy. But I also have research interests that I pursue through the methods of experimental philosophy, which seeks to investigate philosophical questions through the methods of the empirical sciences (in my case, experimental psychology).

I’m co-organizing this workshop with Joshua Knobe and Kevin Tobia (Yale), which will concern (as its name implies) questions at the intersection of history of philosophy and experimental philosophy. It seems that many of the questions that have arisen recently in debates about experimental philosophy have also been discussed in other periods in the history of philosophy, including general issues surrounding armchair and experimental approaches to philosophy. We thought it would be helpful to hold a workshop in which scholars working in the history of philosophy could discuss these issues.

In my presentation, I will be outlining the ways in which this basic dynamic has played out in some periods in the history of Chinese philosophy. Continue reading “Experimental Philosophy Through History – February 2, 2016 at NYU”

December 21, 2015 Posted by | Comparative philosophy, Conference, Confucianism, Neo-Confucianism | no comments

Ziporyn Blogging at Huff Post

Brook Ziporyn, Professor of Chinese Religion, Philosophy, and Comparative Thought in the Divinity School at the University of Chicago, has recently been blogging at the Huffington Post. His most recent piece is titled “Death and the Atheist Mystic: Zhuangzi’s Last Words.” Check it out!

December 20, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Zhuangzi | no comments

Junior Research Fellow in Manuscript and Text Cultures

Queen’s College (Oxford) has recently announced a Junior Research Fellow in Manuscript and Text Cultures, and invites applications from graduates of any university for election to a three-year post-doctoral position as a Junior Research Fellow in Manuscript and Text Cultures, with a research specialism in knowledge-production and text-transmission in pre-modern literate societies. See here for more information.

December 20, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Chinese Texts, Fellowships | no comments

2016 Summer School program at CEU on Comparative Philosophy

What Makes Us Human? Philosophical and Religious Perspectives in China and the West

Central European University (CEU) Summer School, July 4, 2016 – July 15, 2016, Budapest, Hungary

Application deadline is February 14, 2016; more information can be found here. (Participating faculty with expertise in East Asian thought include Curie Virág, Chris Fraser, and Donald Harper.)

December 20, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy | no comments

AAS CIAC Small Grants

The China and Inner Asia Council (CIAC) of the Association of Asian Studies (AAS) has a Small Grant program that funds projects with up to $2,000. The application deadline is February 1, 2016, and details are here.

December 20, 2015 Posted by | China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Opportunities | no comments

New Book – Theories of Truth in Chinese Philosophy

TheoriesOfTruthAlexus McLeod’s new book Theories of Truth in Chinese Philosophy: A Comparative Approach has been released by Rowman and Littlefield International (part of the new “Critical Inquiries in Comparative Philosophy” series).  The book deals with contemporary debates surrounding truth in early Chinese thought, as well as investigates conceptions of truth in the early Chinese texts themselves, from the Warring States through Eastern Han period.  More information here: [http://www.rowmaninternational.com/books/theories-of-truth-in-chinese-philosophy].

Alexus is currently at Colorado State University but will be moving to the University of Connecticut starting in the Fall term of 2016.

December 16, 2015 Posted by | Books of Interest, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy | no comments

12th Annual Midwest Conference on Chinese Thought (CFP)

12th Annual Midwest Conference on Chinese Thought
The University of Chicago
March 11-12, 2016

The Midwest Conference on Chinese Thought was created to foster dialogue and interaction between scholars and students working on Chinese thought across different disciplines and through a variety of approaches. Submissions are invited for papers on any aspect of Chinese thought, as well as papers dealing with comparative issues that engage Chinese perspectives.

This year’s conference will be held on Friday, March 11 and Saturday, March 12 at the University of Chicago. Our keynote speaker will be Chad Hansen, Chair Professor of Chinese Philosophy Emeritus at the University of Hong Kong.

Professor Hansen will discuss classical Chinese ethical naturalism, which elaborates dao (ways, paths) as its focal normative metaphor. Extending his career-long argument that Daoist texts ground normativity in emergent natural contexts, he will present a broadly Zhuangist response to the is-ought problem and moral anti-realism. Modern science does not dispel the mystery of natural ways, but only demarcates more clearly their boundaries. Natural ways include normatively-laden social practices, and seeing those practices as part of nature does not rule out our finding, choosing, constructing and following them correctly. Such a stance does render normative relativism likely and skepticism a constant threat, but this fact need neither paralyze us nor undermine our free and easy pursuit of dao in a rich and complex natural context.

Please submit a 1-page abstract to Stephen Walker at scwalker@uchicago.edu by January 15, 2016 for blind review. For more information, visit the conference website here.

December 8, 2015 Posted by | Call for Papers (CFP), Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | one comment

ICCC Journal welcomes submissions

International Communication of Chinese Culture (ICCC) is a cross-disciplinary journal in the areas of China Studies, Communication, and Cultural Studies. The journal is committed to publishing high-quality research on the analysis, communication, perception and representation of Chinese culture within China and in the world. ICCC invites authors to submit original research articles and provide new critical perspectives on what constitutes Chinese culture, how Chinese culture has taken shape in various forms and through different means and media, and its interactions and exchanges with other cultures in both historical and contemporary contexts. Manuscripts on other related areas are also welcomed. ICCC also features cultural critiques, reports, and book reviews. ICCC publishes in English. All articles will be double-blind peer-reviewed.

December 7, 2015 Posted by | China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Journal News | no comments

NEH Summer Institute: Confucian Asia

This multidisciplinary program, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, will offer five weeks of context-rich and critical engagement with Confucian teachings, practices and primary texts (in translation), examining how they have shaped and been shaped by the cultures and societies of China, Korea, Japan and Vietnam. The program will consider how Confucianism addressed both personal and social needs in ways that were inseparable from the dynamics of intellectual exchange, artistic production, social organization and politics.

Continue reading “NEH Summer Institute: Confucian Asia”

December 7, 2015 Posted by | China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Confucianism, Contemporary Confucianism, Opportunities | no comments

ToC Frontiers of Philosophy in China 10:3

Current Issue: Vol.10, No.3, 2015

Available at: http://journal.hep.com.cn/fpc

Special Theme: Zhuangzi’s Philosophy

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December 3, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Journal News, Tables of Contents, Zhuangzi | no comments

$1M Philosophy Prize

The Berggruen Institute has announced the $1 million Berggruen Philosophy Prize. More information, including how to nominate someone, is below. 

Continue reading “$1M Philosophy Prize”

December 3, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | no comments

CNKI Journal Translation Project

I have recently received information about a new project by CNKI, the outfit behind the Chinese Academic Journal Database, which some of us are lucky enough o have access to through our institutions. The new project is to make at least some of the content available in English translation, and their press release explicitly includes mention of philosophy. There will be a series of webinars introducing the new product, information about which is available here.

December 3, 2015 Posted by | China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Journal News, Journal Related | no comments

APA GradGuide

The APA has released the latest version of its guide to graduate programs in philosophy. It is searchable by field, and currently only three programs (all MA only) are listed under Asian Philosophy, and none under Comparative Philosophy. I know that the situation is dire, but it isn’t quite *that* dire! This is based on self-reported data, so if your school’s program includes Asian or Comparative Philosophy, you might use the feedback form on the site to ask that this information be included.

December 3, 2015 Posted by | American Philosophical Association, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Graduate study | 7 comments

Winter/Spring 2016 Columbia Neo-Confucianism Seminars

There will not be a December 2015 meeting of the Columbia University Seminar on Neo-Confucian Studies this year. Below, however, is a tentative schedule for our Spring 2016 semester.  Note that to avoid scheduling conflicts with the AAS, our April session is not on the first Friday of the month.

  • Friday, February 5, 2016.  Pierce Salguero, Penn State Abingdon.  “Chinese Buddhist Notions of the Body.”
  • Friday, March 4, 2016.  Peter Zarrow, University of Connecticut.
  • Friday, April 22.  Brook Ziporyn, University of Chicago.

Our sessions usually meet from 3:30 to 5:30pm in the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University.   Papers will be circulated in advance.

All are welcome to attend.   Please feel free to forward this message to interested colleagues.  Please also join us after the seminar for dinner at a location to be announced.

December 3, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Neo-Confucianism | no comments

Muller Translates Korean Buddhist-Confucian Debate

The University of Hawaii Press has published Charles Muller’s translation: Korea’s Great Buddhist-Confucian Debate: The Treatises of Chong Tojon (Sambong) and Hamho Tuktong (Kihwa). More information is available below, and here.

Continue reading “Muller Translates Korean Buddhist-Confucian Debate”

November 28, 2015 Posted by | Books of Interest, Buddhism, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Korea, Korean Philosophy, Neo-Confucianism | no comments

Review of Dallmayr’s Being in the World

Loubna El Amine has published a review (available here) of Fred Dallmayr’s Being in the World: Dialogue and Cosmopolis (Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 2013). In light of El Amine’s remarks at the end of the review about the central place still occupied in Dallmayr’s theorizing by Western theory, it may be fruitful to compare with Leigh Jenco’s new book.

November 28, 2015 Posted by | Book Review, Comparative philosophy, Comparative Political Theory | no comments

New Book: Jenco, Changing Referents

I am happy to announce the publication of Leigh Jenco’s new book; congratulations!

L9780190263812eigh Jenco, Changing Referents: Learning Across Space and Time in China and the West (Oxford University Press, 2015): 304 Pages; ISBN: 9780190263812

Globalization has brought together otherwise disparate communities with distinctive and often conflicting ways of viewing the world.  Yet even as these phenomena have exposed the culturally specific character of the academic theories used to understand them, most responses to this ethnocentricity fall back on the same parochial vocabulary they critique. Against those who insist our thinking must return always to the dominant terms of Euro-American modernity, I argue and demonstrate that methods for understanding cultural others can take theoretical guidance from those very bodies of thought typically excluded by political and social theory.

Continue reading “New Book: Jenco, Changing Referents”

November 28, 2015 Posted by | Books of Interest, China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Comparative Political Theory, Political Theory, Politics | no comments

New Issue of Asian Philosophy

Asian Philosophy 25(4) has been published; see here.

November 28, 2015 Posted by | Buddhism, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Tables of Contents | no comments

New Book: Jaeyoon Song, Traces of Grand Peace

Harvard University Press has published Jaeyoon Song’s important new book on Song dynasty political thought and the role of the classics (in particular, the Zhou Li) in shaping politics. Congratulations, Jaeyoon!

Jaeyoon Song, Traces of Grand Peace: Classics and State Activism in Imperial China (Harvard-Yenching Institute Monograph Series 98)

November 28, 2015 Posted by | Books of Interest, China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Chinese Texts, Neo-Confucianism | no comments

Wong Reviews Cline, Families of Virtue

Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews

2015.11.28 View this Review Online   View Other NDPR Reviews

Erin M. Cline, Families of Virtue: Confucian and Western Views on Childhood Development, Columbia University Press, 2015, 342pp., $30.00 (pbk), ISBN 9780231171557 .

Reviewed by David B. Wong, Duke University

This book attributes to early Confucianism the view that the parent-child relationship has a “unique and irreplaceable” role in early moral development (xi) and goes on to argue that this view is right. In the course of making this argument Erin M. Cline provides careful and perceptive comparative readings of early Confucian texts and a very wide range of texts in the Western tradition, from Plato, Aristotle, Locke, and Rousseau to contemporary feminists, to show how unusual and in-depth the insights of Confucian thinkers were. She draws from a wide range of empirical studies to support the Confucian view. There is much in this book that will be of value to anyone with interests in the fields of the philosophy and psychology of moral development, feminist care ethics, and comparative ethics. Cline’s comparison of Confucian and feminist views, which have the most to say about parent-child relationships, is informative and balanced. It is not clear that she has fully established the unique and irreplaceable role of the parent-child relationship, but Cline surely has given enough argument to establish that the relationship is one of the most important factors, perhaps the most important single factor, in moral development, and she raises good questions as to why U.S. society largely neglects its importance in its public policies.

Continue reading “Wong Reviews Cline, Families of Virtue”

November 28, 2015 Posted by | Book Review, Books of Interest, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Confucianism | no comments

Recent Book on Daodejing, Han Feizi, and Machiavelli

A new book of interest: Jason P. Blahuta, Fortune and the Dao: A Comparative Study of Machiavelli, the Daodejing, and the Han Feizi (Lexington, 2015). The publisher’s description:

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November 28, 2015 Posted by | Books of Interest, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Daodejing, Legalism | no comments

CFP: History of Philosophy of Science Conference

I was asked to post this CFP; the organizers are particularly interested in reaching out to people working on Chinese and comparative philosophy, as Karine Chemla is one of our two keynote speakers this year.

HOPOS 2016 Call for Submissions

June 22-25, 2016, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA
http://hopos2016.umn.edu/

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November 28, 2015 Posted by | Call for Papers (CFP), China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Conference, Science | no comments

Karsten Struhl & Graham Priest, Columbia Seminar for Comparative Philosophy: “Buddhism and Marxism: Points of Intersection” — December 11 @ 5:30pm

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes:

KARSTEN STRUHL (John Jay College) and GRAHAM PRIEST (CUNY Graduate Center)

Please join us at Columbia University’s Religion Department on FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11th at 5:30PM for their lecture entitled:

“Buddhism and Marxism: Points of Intersection”

Although Marxism and Buddhism might seem like unlikely bedfellows, they have a number of things in common. Continue reading “Karsten Struhl & Graham Priest, Columbia Seminar for Comparative Philosophy: “Buddhism and Marxism: Points of Intersection” — December 11 @ 5:30pm”

November 23, 2015 Posted by | Buddhism, Comparative philosophy, Lecture | no comments

Chinese Translation of Contemporary Confucian Political Philosophy

I am very haCCPP_Trans_Coverppy to pass on the news that the Chinese translation of my book Contemporary Confucian Political Philosophy: Toward Progressive Confucianism (Polity, 2013) has been published by Jiangxi People’s Press, as 《当代儒家政治哲学:进步儒学发凡》. More information, including the Preface to the Chinese Edition, can be found here. In case anyone is interested in an English-language version of this new Preface, I will post it below.

Continue reading “Chinese Translation of Contemporary Confucian Political Philosophy”

November 22, 2015 Posted by | Books of Interest, China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Comparative Political Theory, Contemporary Confucianism, Mou Zongsan | 3 comments

El Amine’s Reflections on Cross-Cultural Life and Scholarship

Political theorist Loubna El Amine, author of a recent book on Confucian political thinking, has written a provocative reflection on “What is it Like to be Lebanese and to Work on China.”

November 21, 2015 Posted by | Comparative philosophy, Comparative Political Theory | no comments

Two On-Line Analects Resources

Two quite different approaches to the Analects:

November 21, 2015 Posted by | Analects, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Confucianism, Translation | one comment