Warp, Weft, and Way

Chinese and Comparative Philosophy 中國哲學與比較哲學

NYT on Nicholas Berggruen

New York Times piece on Nicholas Berggruen; the Berggruen Institute’s Philosophy and Culture Center has emerged as an important new source of funding and programming in our area. (Disclosure: I am on the Academic Board.)

April 19, 2016 Posted by | Academia, China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Profession | 3 comments

World Congress of Philosophy 2018 in Beijing

In August of 2018, the World Congress of Philosophy will be held in Beijing. The initial circular with information is available here; the English-language website is here.

April 19, 2016 Posted by | China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Conference | 6 comments

More on archiving publications

In response to my posting about archiving my papers, Brian Bruya and I had a bit of correspondence about the differences among home-grown archive sites (like the “WesScholar” site I am using) and others, such as Academia.edu, ResearchGate, PhilPapers, and perhaps others. Brian also pointed me toward this very interesting discussion of the pros- and cons- of various options. Just a couple days ago, a colleague in anthropology told me that in her field, it was very common to post everything — including PDFs of published articles, which I think violates the policies of most journals — on Academia.edu. The advantages in terms of ease of access are pretty obvious, although see the discussion referenced above for some downsides of just using Academia (or, perhaps, any single approach).

Brian himself uses a homegrown arching mechanism, as does Hagop Sarkissian:

I’d be interested in: (1) links to any other on-line sources of work in Chinese and/or comparative philosophy, and (2) any further thoughts about these topics.

April 19, 2016 Posted by | Academia, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Profession, Publishing | no comments

Awalt-Conley, Neo-Confucianism and Physicalism

At my invitation, my former student Dylan Awalt-Conley has agreed to make the following short essay public as a Guest Post. Please address any questions or comments to Dylan. 

Neo-Confucianism and Physicalism 

© 2016, Dylan Awalt-Conley

Despite general enthusiasm for engaging with the Neo-Confucian imaginary in a serious philosophical way, there seem to be some widely held reservations against its use in scientific contexts. Yet I believe that much of the intuitive incompatibility between the Cheng-Zhu metaphysic and a scientific framework comes from a sense of ‘science’ that is constrained by an implicit ontological reductionism. If we are willing to take Neo-Confucianism seriously, then the ontology invoked by concepts like li and qi can provide an experimentally sound alternative to physicalism, complete with new ways of thinking and working scientifically.

Continue reading “Awalt-Conley, Neo-Confucianism and Physicalism”

April 19, 2016 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Metaphysics, Nature, Neo-Confucianism, Science | 7 comments