Warp, Weft, and Way

Chinese and Comparative Philosophy 中國哲學與比較哲學

Fudan Fellow Program

Prof. Tongdong Bai of Fudan writes:

Fudan University has instituted a Fudan Fellow Program.  It accepts both full-time students as well as full-time scholars.  There are two types of fellows: Fudan Senior Fellows for Professors and Associate Professors and Fudan Fellows for Assistant Professors, post-docs and students.  For a flyer that contains more information about the program, see here.

Continue reading “Fudan Fellow Program”

January 8, 2017 Posted by | China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Fellowships | no comments

Updated information on Fudan’s English-language MA Program

For several years Fudan University has run a successful English-language MA program in Chinese philosophy. Updated information is now available on our Graduate Programs page, under “MA Programs.” The priority application deadline (for scholarships) is Feb. 20, 2017. You can also find past discussions of this program here.

December 27, 2016 Posted by | China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Graduate study | no comments

Fudan Programs in Chinese Philosophy

I again offer some information from Prof. Tongdong BAI on Fudan University’s English-language Chinese philosophy programs. There has been discussion of these programs on the blog in the past; search for “Fudan.” 

Thanks to your support, since it was launched in 2011, the MA and Visiting programs in Chinese philosophy (with courses taught in English) at Fudan have been extremely successful. 55 students have been enrolled in either the M.A. program (47 students) and the visiting student program (8 students). They are from the U.S., Canada, Puerto Rico, the U.K., Sweden, the Netherlands, Denmark, Germany, Spain, Italy, Ireland, Poland, Yugoslavia, Romania, Israel, India, and Indonesia, and many of them are top students in their classes, majoring in philosophy, classics, and/or East Asian or Chinese studies. The above facts make these programs simply the most successful of their kind (English-based post-graduate programs in Chinese philosophy) in mainland China.

Continue reading “Fudan Programs in Chinese Philosophy”

January 14, 2016 Posted by | China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Graduate study, Opportunities | no comments

Fudan English-Language Chinese Philosophy Programs

Here is information about the English-language programs in Chinese philosophy offered at Fudan University. We have had some discussion of them here before. and the feedback we’ve gathered has been consistently positive. I had an opportunity to give a lecture to some of the students in this program a year or so ago, and was impressed with the students! The application deadline and other information is below.

Continue reading “Fudan English-Language Chinese Philosophy Programs”

December 21, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Programs of Study | 7 comments

Fudan English-Language Programs in Chinese Philosophy

Tongdong Bai writes:

Thanks to your support, since it was launched in 2010, the MA and Visiting programs in Chinese philosophy (with courses taught in English) at Fudan have been extremely successful.  It has been three years since these programs were launched in 2011, and 34 students have been enrolled in either the M.A. program (28 students) and the
visiting student program (6 students).

Continue reading “Fudan English-Language Programs in Chinese Philosophy”

December 29, 2013 Posted by | China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Graduate study | no comments

A Busy Week at Fudan University

In addition to the lectures by Kurtis Hagen on Xunzi that I just posted about, there are several other events taking place over the next week at Shanghai’s Fudan University. In chronological order:

Friday May 24, 10:00am, P. J. Ivanhoe (Chair Professor of East Asian Philosophy and Religion, City University of Hong Kong) is speaking on “Kongzi and Aristotle as Virtue Ethicists.” Details are here.

Friday May 24, 6:30pm, P. J. Ivanhoe is delivering the first lecture of a series on “Chinese Research on Confucianism in Global Perspective”; Prof. Ivanhoe’s lecture is titled “Confucian Cosmopolitanism.” Details on this and the subsequent lectures in the series are here.

Saturday and Sunday, May 24-25, an international conference on the topic “Chinese Research on Confucianism in Global Perspective” will take place; details on all speakers and titles are here.

Tuesday May 28, 10:00am, I am speaking on the topic “Progressive Confucianism on Social Criticism and the Values of Deference.” Details are here.

I hope that blog readers lucky enough to be in Shanghai will be able to enjoy some of these lectures!

May 22, 2013 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Conference, Confucianism, Contemporary Confucianism, Lecture | no comments

Hagen Gives Lecture Series on Xunzi at Fudan

Kurtis Hagen of SUNY Plattsburgh will be delivering three lectures on Xunzi, all from 10:00am-11:30am, on May 27, 29, and 30, at Fudan University in Shanghai. Details follow!

Continue reading “Hagen Gives Lecture Series on Xunzi at Fudan”

May 22, 2013 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Confucianism, Lecture, Xunzi | no comments

English-based MA and Visiting Programs in Chinese Philosophy at Fudan, Shanghai

M.A. and Visiting Student Programs in Chinese Philosophy
With Courses Offered in English
Fudan University, Shanghai, China

Overview
These programs are aimed to offer opportunities of learning Chinese and studying Chinese philosophy to overseas postgraduates or college juniors and seniors who have not yet been able to master the Chinese language. In addition to Chinese language classes, these programs offer courses on Chinese philosophy as well as other related courses in English at Fudan University. Fudan University is a leading institution of higher education in China, and is experienced with and renowned for educating overseas students. The School of Philosophy at Fudan is a top philosophy department in China. The university is located in Shanghai, the most dynamic city of China that belongs to a region that is rich in Chinese traditions and cultures. It has been two years since these programs were launched, and 21 students have been enrolled in either the M.A. program (17 students) and the visiting student program (4 students). They are from the U.S., Canada, Puerto Rico, the Netherlands, Germany, Italy, Ireland, Israel, and Indonesia, and many of them are top students in their classes, majoring in philosophy, classics, and/or East Asian or Chinese studies. The above facts make these programs simply the most successful of their kind (English-based higher and post-graduate education programs in Chinese philosophy) in mainland China.

  • M.A. Program: a two-year degree program, 29 credits (with 6 credits for 2 courses in Chinese Language) and a master thesis.
  • Visiting Student Program: a one-year program, 3-4 major courses, and 1-2 courses of Chinese, a certificate to be offered upon the completion.
  • Audit Program: individual-course-based program.
  • Tuition and Living Expenses: RMB 50,000 a year for tuition; on-campus housing: from RMB 1,200 per month to 2,700 per month; meals at an on-campus dining facility: RMB 1,000 per month.
  • Scholarships and part-time jobs abundantly available.

Application Deadlines: March 1 (Priority, for scholarships) and June 1.

For Further Information: http://iso.fudan.edu.cn/downloads/zgzx20121129.pdf

The International Student Office: http://www.fso.fudan.edu.cn/ or http://iso.fudan.edu.cn/en/

Or contact Prof. Bai Tongdong, baitongdong@fudan.edu.cn

December 13, 2012 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Graduate study, Opportunities | no comments

Fudan's English-language Chinese Philosophy Programs

Fudan University has successfully launched its English-language Chinese philosophy programs (a one-year Visiting Student program, and a two-year M.A. program) this fall, and is now offering information for those who want to learn more about applying to begin in Fall 2012. Please see this poster for the basic information, and this document with further details. Anyone who has experience with the programs, please let us know in the comments!

December 20, 2011 Posted by | Opportunities, Programs of Study | 4 comments

Fudan M.A. and Visiting Program in Chinese Philosophy

Tongdong Bai sends this update to a previous announcement:
The M.A. and Visiting Student Programs were finally approved by Fudan University, and the application materials are available now.  The programs are aimed to offer opportunities to students who wish to study Chinese philosophy but are not yet able to master the Chinese language.  Various types of scholarships will be available.  In particular, I will personally help to attract funding and to find part-time-job opportunities for students who will enroll in these programs.

January 5, 2011 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Opportunities, Programs of Study | no comments

Study Chinese Philosophy in English at Fudan

Prof. BAI Tongdong would like to announce an exciting new opportunity to study Chinese philosophy, in English (though also with Chinese language courses), at Fudan University in Shanghai. Note that there is some substantial financial assistance available. There are both 2-year MA and 1-year non-degree options. Sounds terrific! Continue reading “Study Chinese Philosophy in English at Fudan”

November 22, 2010 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Graduate study, Opportunities | 3 comments

US National Humanities Center East Asian Scholars Program

For blog readers in East Asia, especially…

NATIONAL HUMANITIES CENTER EAST ASIAN SCHOLARS PROGRAM

With the support of the Henry Luce Foundation, the National Humanities Center invites proposals from scholars at elite East Asian universities for fellowships for the 2018-19 academic year. The current participating universities are Tsinghua, Fudan, Shanghai Jiao Tong, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong University, National University of Singapore, and National Taiwan University, although we are open to expanding participation from stellar institutions.

Continue reading “US National Humanities Center East Asian Scholars Program”

August 26, 2017 Posted by | Fellowships, Opportunities | no comments

Book talk with Melissa Williams

Book talk with Melissa Williams, Co-Editor of East Asian Perspectives on Political Legitimacy: Bridging the Empirical-Normative Divide

Monday, April 3, 2017, 4:15pm to 5:30pm; Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, Suite 200N, 124 Mt Auburn Street, Cambridge

Join us for a discussion with Melissa Williams, Professor of Political Science, and founding Director of the Centre for Ethics at the University of Toronto, Senior Visiting Scholar at the Harvard Kennedy School and Co-Editor of “East Asian Perspectives on Political Legitimacy: Bridging the Empirical-Normative Divide“, and Tongdong Bai, the Dongfang Chair Professor of Philosophy at Fudan University in China and Berggruen Fellow at Harvard’s Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics. Archon Fung, Academic Dean and Ford Foundation Professor of Democracy and Citizenship, HKS, will moderate.

March 25, 2017 Posted by | Books of Interest, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Comparative Political Theory | no comments

Graduate Programs in Chinese Philosophy

Here follows an alphabetic list of PhD programs in philosophy in which one can study Chinese philosophy in English. For each program, we include:

  • Link to department
  • Names of those whose specialization relates to Chinese philosophy, with links to their webpages
  • Link to placement information
  • Further information about studying Chinese philosophy there

At the bottom of the list, we also list MA-specific programs that include an emphasis on Chinese philosophy, as well as “Cognate Programs” (i.e., non-Philosophy PhD programs) with specialists in Chinese philosophy. (We hope to include more each information on programs in each of these categories in the near future.)

We have chosen to present descriptive information without guidance or evaluation. For discussion of how to pursue graduate training in Chinese philosophy, the following might be of use:

The initial work on this list was conducted by Yong Huang, Steve Angle, Jim Behuniak, and Alexus McLeod. We welcome additions, comments, or corrections.


Recent changes (as of June 20 2017):

  • Added Van Norden (two-year visitor at Yale-NUS) to NUS listing

Australia National University
Chinese University of Hong Kong
City University of Hong Kong
CUNY Graduate Center
Duke University
East China Normal University
Georgetown University
Hong Kong Baptist University
Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
Lingnan University
Nanyang Technological University (Singapore)
National University of Singapore
Southern Illinois University Carbondale
University of New Mexico
University of Auckland
University of British Columbia
University of California, Berkeley
University of California, Riverside
University of Connecticut
University of Hawaii
University of Hong Kong
University of Macau
University of New South Wales
University of Oklahoma
University of Toronto
University of Utah


Australia National University

Specialists:

  • Bronwyn Finnigan, philosophy of action, ethics, philosophy of mind and epistemology in Western and Asian philosophical traditions
  • Koji Tanaka, Buddhist Philosophy and Logic, Chinese Philosophy

Placement information

Further information:


Chinese University of Hong Kong

Specialists:

  • David Chai, Daoist philosophy, comparative philosophy
  • Chung-yi Cheng, Confucianism, Chinese philosophy, comparative philosophy
  • Yong Huang, Chinese philosophy, comparative philosophy, moral philosophy
  • Kai-chiu Ng, Chinese philosophy, Confucianism
  • Zhihua Yao, Buddhist philosophy, Chinese philosophy, Indian philosophy

Placement information not available

Further information:


City University of Hong Kong (Department of Public Policy)

Specialists:

  • Ho-mun Chan, comparative philosophy
  • Ruiping Fan, Confucianism, comparative bioethics
  • Eirik Harris, Chinese philosophy (especially the political thought of Han Fei and Xunzi), comparative philosophy, contemporary moral and political philosophy
  • Philip J. Ivanhoe, Chinese philosophy
  • Sungmoon Kim, Chinese philosophy, political philosophy

Placement information not available

Further information:


CUNY Graduate Center

Specialists:

  • Graham Priest, Philosophical logic, Philosophies of Mathematics and Language, Metaphysics, History of Philosophy (East and West), Buddhist Philosophy
  • Hagop Sarkissian, Moral Psychology, Metaethics, Chinese Philosophy, Cognitive Science of Religion

Placement Information

Further Information:


Duke University

Specialists:

  • Owen Flanagan, Philosophy of Mind and Psychiatry, Ethics, Moral Psychology, Cross-Cultural Philosophy
  • David B. Wong, Chinese Philosophy, Comparative Philosophy, Ethics

Placement information

Further Information:


East China Normal University

Specialists (for details on all the below individuals in English, see here; for more on the department faculty in Chinese, see here):

  • Yang Guorong, metaphysics, ethics, history of Chinese philosophy, comparative philosophy
  • Zong Desheng, philosophy of language, ethics, comparative philosophy
  • Yu Zhenhua, metaphysics, epistemology and comparative philosophy
  • Fang Xudong, Neo-Confucianism, Confucian Ethics, Interpretation of classics
  • Xue Yu, Chinese Buddhism
  • Liu Liangjian, Chinese philosophy, comparative study of Chinese and Western philosophy
  • Paul Joseph D’Ambrosio, Chinese philosophy, Neo-Daoism (Xuanxue), comparative study of Western and Chinese philosophy, ethics

Placement information not available

Further information:

See the departmental link above for more information on the history and scope of the department’s English-language programs.


Georgetown University

Specialists:

  • Erin Cline (primary appointment in Theology; Associate Member of the Philosophy Department and a member of its Primary Dissertation Faculty), early Chinese ethical, religious, and political thought

Placement information

Further information:

Students can apply to the Philosophy PhD program to work with Professor Cline and/or other Philosophy department members with appreciation for Asian or comparative philosophy. Georgetown offers classical Chinese and has many other Asianists in history, religious studies, and elsewhere. Students can also apply to the Ph.D. program in Theological and Religious Studies (housed in the Theology Department) to study Chinese philosophy.


Hong Kong Baptist University

Specialists:

  • Benedict Chan, Social & Political Philosophy, Applied Ethics & Moral Philosophy, Comparative Philosophy, Chinese Philosophy, Philosophy of Religion, Philosophy of Mind
  • Jonathan Chan, Chinese philosophy
  • LO Ping Cheung, Applied Ethics, Religious Ethics, Chinese Philosophy
  • NG Yau-nang, New Confucianism, Chinese Philosophy, Comparative Religious Philosophy
  • Lauren Pfister, Chinese philosophy
  • Ellen Zhang, Chinese philosophy

Placement information not available

Further information:


Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

Specialists:

Placement information not available

Further Information:


Lingnan University

Specialists:

Placement information not available

Further information:


Nanyang Technological University (Singapore)

Specialists:

  • LI Chenyang, Chinese Philosophy, Comparative Philosophy Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy
  • PARK So Jeong, Chinese Philosophy, Philosophy of Music, Daoism and Buddhism
  • SUNG Hiu Chuk Winnie, Chinese Philosophy, Self-knowledge , Moral Psychology
  • Alan Chan, Primary: Daoism and Confucianism; Secondary: Hermeneutics and Critical Theory

Placement information not available

Further information:

The NTU Philosophy Group was established in view of the rich intellectual and cultural resources available at a research-intensive science and technological university located in culturally affluent Singapore. As such, the master plan of our programmes is focused primarily on (1) Philosophy of Science and (2) Chinese Philosophy. Both areas of research are conducted with an interdisciplinary approach and an East-West comparative perspective.


National University of Singapore

Specialists:

  • LOY Hui Chieh, Chinese Philosophy, Greek Philosophy
  • TAN Sor Hoon, Comparative Philosophy, Chinese Philosophy, Political Philosophy, Pragmatism
  • Cecilia LIM, Comparative Environmental Ethics (etc.),
  • LO Yuet Keung (Chinese studies; classes in Chinese), Chinese Philosophy
  • Elton CHAN (Yale-NUS), Confucianism, comparative political philosophy, ideal and non-ideal theory, republicanism, virtue ethics, liberalism, neutrality and perfectionism
  • Scott Cook (Yale-NUS), Chinese texts and intellectual history
  • Cathay LIU (Yale-NUS), history of philosophy
  • Bryan Van Norden (Yale-NUS), Chinese Philosophy
  • Matthew Walker (Yale-NUS), Ancient Greek philosophy, comparative philosophy

Placement information not available

Further information:

As a group, the NUS and affiliated Yale-NUS graduate faculty includes twenty-one philosophers actively working on projects in moral and political philosophy; metaphysics, epistemology, and philosophy of mind; Chinese philosophy, Indian philosophy, and the history of Western philosophy.


Southern Illinois University Carbondale

Specialists:

  • Douglas Berger, Indian Philosophy, Chinese Philosophy, 19th & 20th Century Continental Philosophy

Placement information not available

Further information:

“In addition to being one of the primary programs in the country at which one may study the American philosophical tradition, we also specialize in Continental and Asian thought.”


University of New Mexico

Specialists:

  • Emily McRae– Buddhist Philosophy, Ethics, Moral Psychology, Feminism

Placement information

Further information:

UNM has a number of faculty in areas that may also be of interest to some studying Chinese Philosophy, such as Indian Philosophy and Tibetan Philosophy.  They are making a hire this year in Buddhist Philosophy.


University of Auckland

Specialists:

Placement information

Further information:

Asian Philosophy is not listed as an area of expertise in the Auckland program’s listing of postgraduate specializations, but it does say that one can customize a course of study suitable to one’s particular needs and interests.


University of British Columbia

Specialists:

Placement information not available

Further information:

Slingerland is housed in the Department of Asian Studies, but is an Associate member of the Department of Philosophy. See here for more information on his graduate supervision.


University of California, Berkeley

Specialists:

Placement information

Further information:

There is no regular track or concentration in Chinese philosophy in the Berkeley program, the department stresses however that its Ph.D. program is “structured to give students a high degree of independence in tailoring their studies to their interests.” Professor Shun “teaches two courses a year, primarily on Chinese philosophy and moral psychology, and devotes the rest of his time to researching and promoting the philosophical study of Confucian thought.”


University of California, Riverside

Specialists:

Placement information

Further information:

Raphals is in the department of Comparative Literature and Foreign Languages, but is also affiliated with the Philosophy Department as “Cooperating Faculty”.


University of Connecticut 

Specialists:

  • Alexus McLeod, Chinese Philosophy, Mesoamerican Philosophy (esp. Maya), Comparative Philosophy

Placement information

Further information:

UConn also has a number of philosophers working in other areas that may be of interest to students of Chinese Philosophy, as well as Peter Zarrow in the History department, who works on Modern Chinese Thought.


University of Hawaii

Specialists:

  • Chung-ying Cheng, Chinese Philosophy (Classical and Neo-Confucianism), Comparative Philosophy
  • Franklin Perkins, Classical Chinese Philosophy, Early Modern European Philosophy, Comparative Philosophy

Placement information

Further information:

A number of other faculty in the Philosophy Department work in areas possibly of interest to students of Chinese Philosophy, including Indian Philosophy, Japanese Philosophy.  Perkins starts at Hawaii in January 2017.


University of Hong Kong

Specialists:

  • Joseph Chan, Confucian political philosophy
  • Jiwei CI, Social philosophy, political philosophy, ethics; modern and contemporary China viewed from the perspectives of social and political philosophy and ethics
  • Chris Fraser, Mohist philosophy, Daoist philosophy, Confucian philosophy, ethics, theory of action
  • Dan Robins, Mohist philosophy, Daoist philosophy, Confucian philosophy
  • TANG Siu-fu, Early Confucianism (in particular the thought of Xunzi), ethics and political philosophy, comparative philosophy, and issues of modernity and Chinese thought.

Placement information not available

Further information:

Joseph Chan is in the Department of Politics and Public Administration; Tang Siu-fu is in the Department of Chinese.


University of Macau

Specialists:

  • Jinhua Jia, Buddhist philosophy
  • Hans-Georg Moeller, Daoist philosophy, social theory, comparative philosophy, Chinese philosophy
  • Weigang Chen, Confucian philosophy
  • Mario Wenning, Social and Political Philosophy, Intercultural Philosophy, Aesthetics
  • Victoria Harrison, analytic philosophy of religion with a focus on ancient Indian and classical Chinese philosophies.

Placement information not available

Further information:

(1/19/2017) The program is currently accepting PhD students and steadily growing every year. This applies to the research projects of various faculty members but most notably to the one Hans-Georg Moeller is currently directing, namely, “Daoist Philosophy in Contemporary Contexts: Strategies of Sanity in Today’s World.” There are three students currently writing their doctoral dissertations under this funding scheme.


University of New South Wales

Specialists:

  • Karyn Lai, Chinese philosophy, Environmental philosophy

Placement information not available

Further information:

Classical Chinese philosophy is listed as one of several “History and Philosophical Traditions” concentrations offered in the program.


University of Oklahoma

Specialists:

Placement information

Further information:


University of Toronto

Specialists:

Placement information

Further information:

The Toronto program prides itself on offering broad coverage in all areas of the history of Philosophy, as well as “in aspects of the history of non-Western philosophy.”


University of Utah

Specialists:

  • Eric Hutton, Chinese philosophy, ancient Greek philosophy, ethics

Placement information

Further information:

The Philosophy department is willing to offer financial support to both MA/MS and PhD students. Students who are interested in Chinese philosophy may also wish to investigate the MA program in Asian Studies, if they are interested in pursuing a more inter-disciplinary track.


MA only

Eastern Michigan University

  • Details here. One of the department’s two MA tracks is in pluralistic philosophical “methodology.”

Fudan University (Shanghai)

East China Normal University (Shanghai)

  • Information on the English-language MA program at ECNU is available here

Renmin University (Beijing)

  • Details on the English-language MA Program in “Chinese Philosophy, Religion, and Culture are here

San Francisco State University

San Jose State University

Wuhan University

  • Details on the English-language International MA Program here


Cognate Programs

Boston University (Robert Neville)

Georgetown University (Erin Cline, Theology; see also above for Philosophy options)

Harvard University (Michael Puett, Peter Bol)

Indiana University (Aaron Stalnaker, Michael Ing, Nicholas Vogt); see also here.

KU Leuven (Carine Defoort, Nicolas Standaert); see also here.

London School of Economics (Leigh Jenco)

Northwestern (Loubna El Amine)

Pennsylvania State University (Erica Brindley, On-cho Ng)

University of California, Berkeley (Mark Csikszentmihalyi, Michael Nylan)

University of Chicago Divinity School (Brook Ziporyn)

University of Pennsylvania (Paul Goldin)

December 15, 2016 Posted by | | no comments

Chinese Philosophy in Berlin

Philippe Brunozzi asked me to post the following announcement (indeed, it is a promising development that one of the major philosophy departments in continental Europe is building up a curriculum in Chinese Philosophy!!):

Continue reading “Chinese Philosophy in Berlin”

October 19, 2016 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | 2 comments

Bai Tongdong – Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy Lecture: “Pre-Qin Chinese Thought as a Modern Political Philosophy”, Nov.11 @ 5:30pm

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes: TONGDONG BAI (Fudan University)
With responses from: VIREN MURTHY (University of Wisconsin Madison)

Please join us at Columbia University’s Religion Department on FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 11th at 5:30PM for his lecture entitled:

“Pre-Qin Chinese Thought as a Modern Political Philosophy”

ABSTRACT: In this paper, I will deal with the issue of the legitimacy of Chinese philosophy as a philosophy first.  With the definition of philosophy as a systematic reflection on fundamental human problems that transcend time, place, and a particular people, I will argue that there is a philosophical dimension in traditional Chinese thought.  I will also explain and defend the ways Chinese philosophy expresses its systematic reflections.  I will also respond to the criticism that the elucidation and systematization effort in dealing with Chinese philosophy makes Chinese philosophy lose its significance.  Moreover, I will argue that comparative philosophy should be problem-oriented, and the problems with which the pre-Qin thinkers dealt resemble those in early European modernity.  Thus, not only is Chinese philosophy a philosophy, but it is a modern political philosophy.  Through the analysis of the nature of pre-Qin philosophy, I also hope to direct the readers to a reevaluation of the nature of modernity, and of the relevance of pre-Qin philosophy to today’s world. Continue reading “Bai Tongdong – Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy Lecture: “Pre-Qin Chinese Thought as a Modern Political Philosophy”, Nov.11 @ 5:30pm”

October 18, 2016 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | no comments

Eric Schwitzgebel – Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy Lecture: “Death and Self in the Incomprehensible Zhuangzi”, THURSDAY Oct.13 @ 5:30pm

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes: ERIC SCHWITZGEBEL (University of California Riverside)
With responses from: CHRISTOPHER GOWANS (Fordham University)

Please join us at Columbia University’s Religion Department on *THURSDAY*, OCTOBER 13th at 5:30PM for his lecture entitled:

“Death and Self in the Incomprehensible Zhuangzi”

ABSTRACT: The ancient Chinese philosopher Zhuangzi defies interpretation. This is an inextricable part of the beauty and power of his work. The text – by which I mean the “Inner Chapters” of the text traditionally attributed to him, the authentic core of the book – is incomprehensible as a whole. It consists of shards, in a distinctive voice. Despite repeating imagery, ideas, style, and tone, these shards cannot be pieced together into a self-consistent philosophy. This lack of self-consistency is a positive feature of Zhuangzi. It is part of what makes him the great and unusual philosopher he is, defying reduction and summary.  In this talk, I will look at Zhuangzi’s inconsistent remarks about death and the self. Continue reading “Eric Schwitzgebel – Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy Lecture: “Death and Self in the Incomprehensible Zhuangzi”, THURSDAY Oct.13 @ 5:30pm”

October 5, 2016 Posted by | Daoism, Lecture, Zhuangzi | no comments

Tongdong Bai to speak at Boston Univ.

The Boston University Confucian Association is sponsoring a lecture by Prof. Tongdong BAI of Fudan University on September 28, 2016. The topic is “A New Confucian Tianxia Model and Its Superiority to the Nation-State and Liberal Models.” Please see here for more details.

September 11, 2016 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Comparative Political Theory, Lecture | no comments

Tao Jiang – Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy Lecture: “Between Philosophy and History: The Challenge of Authorship to Classical Chinese Philosophy in the Western Academy”, Sep.23 @ 5:30pm

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes: TAO JIANG (Rutgers University)

With responses from: ESKE MØLLGAARD (University of Rhode Island)

Please join us at Columbia University’s Religion Department on FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23rd at 5:30PM for his lecture entitled:

“Between Philosophy and History: The Challenge of Authorship to Classical Chinese Philosophy in the Western Academy”

 ABSTRACT: The tension between philosophical and historical inquiries has been a perennial problem. Within the modern academy, the disciplines of philosophy and history are protected by their respective institutional norm and practice, without much need for interaction. However, Chinese philosophy, situated between Sinology and philosophy in the western academy, has encountered extraordinary challenges from both Sinologists (most of whom are historians) and (Western) philosophers. At the root of the difficulty facing Chinese philosophy lies its very legitimacy, torn between the historicist orientation of Sinology and the presentist orientation of mainstream contemporary Western philosophy. Such divergent disciplinary norms have put scholars of Chinese philosophy in a difficult position. On the one hand, they have to defend the philosophical nature, or even the philosophical worthiness, of classical Chinese texts in front of contemporary Western philosophers whose interests tend to be more issue-driven and in the philosophical integrity of ideas, rather than the historicity of ideas. At the same time, these scholars of Chinese philosophy, when dealing with Sinologists, need to justify the basic premise of their philosophical approach to the classics due to the historical ambiguity and compositional instability of these texts. Continue reading “Tao Jiang – Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy Lecture: “Between Philosophy and History: The Challenge of Authorship to Classical Chinese Philosophy in the Western Academy”, Sep.23 @ 5:30pm”

September 4, 2016 Posted by | History of Philosophy, Lecture, Sinology, Zhuangzi | 11 comments

Michael Sandel and Chinese Philosophy

Paul D’Ambrosio writes:

Next week I am hosting a small conference at East China Normal University. If anyone is in the area and would like to attend please send me at email: pauljdambrosio@hotmail.com. The conference schedule follows.

Continue reading “Michael Sandel and Chinese Philosophy”

March 3, 2016 Posted by | China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Conference | 2 comments

Bai Review Bell, The China Model

Bai Tongdong of Fudan University has review Daniel Bell’s The China Model: Political Meritocracy and the Limits of Democracy (Princeton University Press, 2015) at NDPR. Read on for the link and for the full review.

Continue reading “Bai Review Bell, The China Model”

January 14, 2016 Posted by | Book Review, China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative Political Theory, Politics | no comments

Chinese Translation of Contemporary Confucian Political Philosophy

I am very haCCPP_Trans_Coverppy to pass on the news that the Chinese translation of my book Contemporary Confucian Political Philosophy: Toward Progressive Confucianism (Polity, 2013) has been published by Jiangxi People’s Press, as 《当代儒家政治哲学:进步儒学发凡》. More information, including the Preface to the Chinese Edition, can be found here. In case anyone is interested in an English-language version of this new Preface, I will post it below.

Continue reading “Chinese Translation of Contemporary Confucian Political Philosophy”

November 22, 2015 Posted by | Books of Interest, China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Comparative Political Theory, Contemporary Confucianism, Mou Zongsan | 3 comments

Publication Opportunity: Early Chinese Self-Cultivation

Publication opportunity (non-peer-reviewed) for articles on “early Chinese self-cultivation”. On July 1st, 2015, Paul Fischer (Western Kentucky University) and Lin Zhipeng 林志鵬 (Fudan University) hosted a workshop in Shanghai on early Chinese self-cultivation (entitled 治氣養心之術——中國早期修身方法), hosted by the 復旦大學中華文明國際研究中心. (Please find the schedule attached.) The Center is willing to publish the collected papers of the workshop, but have allowed us to expand the volume somewhat. Therefore we are seeking submissions from non-participants to be included in this volume.

Continue reading “Publication Opportunity: Early Chinese Self-Cultivation”

July 17, 2015 Posted by | Buddhism, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Opportunities, Philosophy in China | no comments

Workshop in Shanghai on July 1

Paul Fischer (Western Kentucky University; currently visiting at Fudan) writes with information about a workshop on Chinese self-cultivation, to be held at Fudan on July 1. All are welcome! Please contact Dr. Fischer with any questions.

Continue reading “Workshop in Shanghai on July 1”

June 15, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Conference, Self-Cultivation | no comments

Discussion of Slote’s “Reset Button”

The article from the current issue of Dao that we have chosen for discussion is Michael Slote’s “The Philosophical Reset Button: A Manifesto,” available via open-access here. This time around, we offer opening comments from both BAI Tongdong of Fudan University, and myself (Steve Angle). Those comments follow here, and let the discussion begin!

Continue reading “Discussion of Slote’s “Reset Button””

April 9, 2015 Posted by | China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Dao Article Discussion, Emotions | 11 comments

Reading the Old in the Light of the Newly Discovered: Chinese Philosophy and Ancient Chinese Texts

Macquarie University, Sydney, will be the first in Australia to host an international conference on ancient Chinese thought and the newly recovered ancient bamboo and silk texts, from 8th to 10th December 2014.

Organized by Chinese Studies of the Department of International Studies (Languages and Cultures), Faculty of Arts, the symposium will focus on the latest research of international importance: traditional Chinese thought in the newly recovered ancient texts.

Dates and Venues:

Day 1 – Monday 8th December
Opening Ceremony – 9:30 for 10:00am – 11:00am, Macquarie University Art Gallery, Building E11A
RSVP: dsklee@bigpond.net.au. Limited seats are available.
Conference begins 11:30am – 5:15pm, C5C T1 Theatre (Open to all, free admission)

Day 2 – Tuesday 9th December
9:00am- 5:15pm, Tuesday, W5C 220.

Day 3 – Wednesday 10th December
9:00am- 5:15pm, Wednesday, W5C220

Contact
For details, please contact Dr Shirley Chan, shirley.chan@mq.edu.au, +612 98507021

Programme 1-12a Extract

In the past four decades, the discovery of previously unknown texts dating to the fourth century BCE and to the Han Dynasty, as well as older versions of known texts, has revolutionized the study of early Chinese philosophy and history. The texts are of great significance in understanding the development of the major strands in Chinese thought particularly what we now speak of as “Daoism” and “Confucianism” — that have had enduring significance in many Asian cultures, and in allowing us a fresh opportunity to ask crucial questions about ancient Chinese culture and history. Experts and key researchers in the fields of early Chinese writing and classical Chinese thought are being invited to contribute to the discussion of the topics in terms of modes of manuscript production, Chinese intellectual history, and new interpretations of Chinese thought as revealed in these newly recovered texts. The conference has received overwhelming response from international and local scholars. We expect the bilingual discussion to provide a rare platform for exchange among Chinese and Western scholars, significantly advancing the frontiers of knowledge of early China and traditional Chinese culture. Admission to the conference is free.

There are more than 30 speakers from universities in Australia, China, America, Singapore and Hong Kong including the following:

* Australian National University
* Beijing Normal University
* Bohai University
* Capital Normal University
* Chinese Academy of Social Sciences
* DePaul University
* East China Normal University
* Fudan University
* University of Hawaii
* University of Hong Kong
* Hubei University of Economics
* Ji’ning University
* Lehigh University
* Macquarie University
* University of Melbourne
* Nanjing University
* National University of Singapore
* Peking University
* University of Sydney
* University of Technology Sydney
* Tsinghua University
* Wuhan University

More information is available at: http://arts.mq.edu.au/news_and_events/events/faculty_conferences/reading_the_old_in_the_light_of_the_newly_discovered_chinese_philosophy_and_ancient_chinese_texts

 

December 1, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | no comments

New Book on Daoism

Three Pines Press proudly announces the second volume in our new series
Contemporary Chinese Scholarship in Daoist Studies

Rediscovering the Roots of Chinese Thought: Laozi’s Philosophy
by CHEN Guying, translated by Paul D’Ambrosio
ISBN 978-1-931483-61-2
paperback, 150 pages, bibliography, index
available January 1, 2015
US $27.95
prepublication special: US $22.50
ORDER NOW: www.threepinespress.com<http://www.threepinespress.com/>

Continue reading “New Book on Daoism”

November 20, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Daodejing, Daoism, Laozi, Zhuangzi | no comments

New Issue of Dao

Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy Volume 13, Issue 3, September 2014

Continue reading “New Issue of Dao”

August 23, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Tables of Contents | no comments

Call for Commentators for Eastern APA

Huaiyu Wang writes as follows (anyone interested please respond directly to him at wdhyana@gmail.com):

I am pleased to announce the tentative schedule for the following two panels for the Eastern APA meeting in Philadelphia. I would like to invite chairs for the two panels below and a commentator for each paper. (Please note that two papers have commentators already.)

Continue reading “Call for Commentators for Eastern APA”

May 13, 2014 Posted by | Buddhism, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Conference, Confucianism, Dai Zhen, Daoism, Organization News | no comments

Event in Singapore: Can Confucianism Save the World?

Can Confucianism Save the World? Reflections by Three Contemporary Political Thinkers

Speakers:

  • Prof Daniel A. Bell, Professor of Ethics and Political Philosophy; Director of the Center for International and Comparative Political Philosophy, Tsinghua University
  • Prof Joseph Chan, Professor in the Department of Politics and Public Administration, University of Hong Kong
  • Prof Tongdong Bai, Dongfang Chair Professor of Philosophy, Fudan University

Date:                     Thursday, 15 May 2014

Time:                     5:15pm-6:30pm

Venue:                 Lobby, Oei Tiong Ham Building, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, Singapore

May 8, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | 2 comments

New Essays on Bai Tongdong’s Blog

Fudan University professor and sometime contributor to this blog, Bai Tongdong, has his own blog here, and has recently posted some essays there (in Chinese) that some readers may be interested in. The most recent is “传统正名系列3 作为普适价值的儒学” or “Rectification of Names #3: Confucianism as Universal Value.” It is a provocative and (in my view) constructive interjection into the debates that have been raging over “universal” (which often is code for “Western”) values. Enjoy

April 4, 2014 Posted by | China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Contemporary Confucianism, Philosophy in China | no comments

Translation of Vol. 1 of Ge Zhaoguang’s Intellectual History Published

Ge Zhaoguang’s Intellectual History of China was a landmark event in Chinese scholarship, moving beyond earlier history-of-ideas or Marxist frameworks. The first volume has now been published in English translation.

Continue reading “Translation of Vol. 1 of Ge Zhaoguang’s Intellectual History Published”

February 9, 2014 Posted by | Books of Interest, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | 7 comments

CFP: ACPA group sessions at 2014 Pacific APA in San Diego (April 16-20, 2014)

Call for Papers and Abstracts: The Association of Chinese Philosophers in North America [ACPA] group sessions at 2014 Pacific APA meeting in San Diego.

Continue reading “CFP: ACPA group sessions at 2014 Pacific APA in San Diego (April 16-20, 2014)”

July 30, 2013 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | no comments

Call for Commentators-ACPA at APA Eastern 2013

MOVED TO TOP WITH THE FOLLOWING MESSAGE:

We still need commentators, and please let me know if you are interested.  Dr. Kim’s and Mr. Lu’s papers already have commentators (and there are three other commentators who are not set on any particular paper yet).  Thanks!

– Tongdong Bai (baitongdong@gmail.com)

ACPA Group Meeting at the APA Eastern Convention
December 27-30, 2013, at the Marriott Waterfront, Baltimore

 

Session 1: Moral Cultivation and Moral Agency in Confucianism and Western Philosophy
1. Mental Blindness and Moral Rectitude: The jiebi chapter of the Xunzi

David Chai, University of Toronto, Canada, david.chai@utoronto.ca

Abstract: The idea of being figuratively blind is a well-used trope in early Confucian thought. Confucius referred to blindness of virtue while Mencius to blindness of the senses and speech. For Xunzi, blindness stems from a person having ‘two minds,’ that is, one’s mind is caught between two principles or goals of moral conduct. Xunzi’s solution, like Guanzi’s theory of ‘mental arts’ (xinshu 心術), was to engage in ‘singular concentration’ (jing 精). Through a close hermeneutic reading of chapter 21 of the Xunzi (jiebi 解蔽, “Removing Blindness”), this paper will examine Xunzi’s use of jing and how cultivating one’s mental essence by adhering to Dao can result in overcoming mental blindness. It will also look at one of the more interesting metaphors Xunzi uses, that of brightness (ming 明). Moral brightness is a quality every person should strive for in that it reflects the perfect virtue of Dao. For Xunzi, using ming to nurture jing is not enough to cure a person completely of their mental blindness however; they must endeavor to replicate the mind of Dao. How they do this is through studying the principle of men’s minds as Xunzi so clearly illustrates: “Sageliness consists in a comprehensive grasp of the natural relationships between men. True kingship consists in a comprehensive grasp of the regulations for government. A comprehensive grasp of both is sufficient to become the ridgepole for the world.” (Xunzi, 21.9)

Continue reading “Call for Commentators-ACPA at APA Eastern 2013”

May 20, 2013 Posted by | Comparative philosophy, Conference, Confucianism, Ethical Theory | no comments

“Comparative Enlightenments” Forum at Wesleyan

Last weekend, Wesleyan hosted an interdisciplinary forum on “comparative enlightenments” that blog readers might find interesting; read here for an account in English, and here for a Chinese summary. Keynote remarks were offered by Wang Weiguang and Gao Xiang of CASS and Hayden White of Stanford. Participants included philosophers like Chen Lai (Tsinghua), Wu Genyou (Wuhan), Ding Yun (Fudan), Han Shuifa (Beijing), and Akeel Bilgrami (Columbia), as well as literary theorists and historians. (It’s interesting to note the differences of emphasis in the two write-ups :-).)

May 14, 2013 Posted by | Comparative philosophy, Conference, Philosophy in China | 5 comments

ACPA call for papers

(Just moving this up to the front, by way of reminding those who might be interested, of the April 30 deadline.)

The Association of Chinese Philosophers in North America [ACPA]

Call for Papers and Abstracts – ACPA Group Meeting at the APA Eastern Convention

Submission deadline: April 30, 2013

December 27-30, 2013, at the Marriott Waterfront, Baltimore

Description:  ACPA group meetings at the APA conventions have been successful in providing scholars an opportunity to try out new ideas and receive inputs for further development of the paper.  The attendance has been good, and we have always arranged one commentator for each paper presented.  We now welcome scholars to submit completed drafts, paper abstracts, or panel proposals for the 2013 APA Eastern Meeting.  With one session devoted to the panel for DAO best essay award, we shall continue to host another session with three to four papers, with commentators for each paper.  We will try to organize the session in keeping with a cohesive theme.  Therefore, the selection of the paper for presentation will be partially based on how well it can be worked into a good session.

Continue reading “ACPA call for papers”

April 17, 2013 Posted by | Call for Papers (CFP), Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy | no comments

AAS in San Diego Next Week

There’s not a ton of philosophy on the AAS program for next week — there never is — but for the first time in years, I’m going to be there and would enjoy meeting any Warp, Weft, and Way readers who are also attending. Here are a couple interesting panels, as seen from my perspective (listed in chronological order):

Continue reading “AAS in San Diego Next Week”

March 13, 2013 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Conference | 3 comments

International Conference on Nature and Value in Chinese and Western Philosophies

I am pleased to be able to share the program for a conference that Tao Jiang of Rutgers University has organized, with some assistance from me and from Ruth Chang of Rutgers. Anyone who is interested in attending can contact Ms. Susan Rosario (see below) for information.

1st Annual Rutgers Workshop on Chinese Philosophy (RWCP)

An International Conference on Nature and Value in Chinese and Western Philosophies

April 4-5, 2013
Rutgers University Inn & Conference Center 178 Ryders Lane
New Brunswick, NJ 08901
USA

Continue reading “International Conference on Nature and Value in Chinese and Western Philosophies”

January 30, 2013 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Conference, Nature | 10 comments

Review of Angle, Contemporary Confucian Political Philosophy

NDRP has published a review by BAI Tongdong of Fudan University of my recent book, Contemporary Confucian Political Philosophy: Towards Progressive Confucianism (Polity, 2012). Many thanks to Tongdong for this generous review!

I’d like to take this opportunity to respond very briefly to a couple of the things that Tongdong says in his review. He feels that both Mou Zongsan and I, in our related but separate ways, have left largely unaddressed the question: “can Confucianism make any constructive and systematic contributions to fundamental issues in political philosophy other than being only a “cheerleader” (a sincere one, as Angle tries to show) of liberal democracy?” This is related to some of the other critical remarks he raises late in the review, including the suggestion that in my chapter on human rights, I rest content with the current “responsibility to protect” doctrine, and also Tongdong’s questions about how “Confucian” Progressive Confucianism is.

Continue reading “Review of Angle, Contemporary Confucian Political Philosophy”

January 18, 2013 Posted by | Book Review, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Comparative Political Theory, Contemporary Confucianism, Mou Zongsan, Politics | 8 comments

CFP: 2013 Comparative and Continental Philosophy Circle

The Comparative and Continental Philosophy Circle has announced its 2013 annual meeting, to be held at Fudan University in Shanghai on March 22-24. For more information, please see the CCP website.

October 14, 2012 Posted by | Call for Papers (CFP), Comparative philosophy, Conference | no comments

New Book: Bai on Chinese Political Philosophy

Tongdong BAI of Fudan University has a new book coming with Zed Books: China — The Middle Way of the Middle Kingdom surveys Chinese political philosophy. I’ve read the book and really liked it; my blurb on the back cover reads: Continue reading “New Book: Bai on Chinese Political Philosophy”

September 25, 2012 Posted by | Books of Interest, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative Political Theory, Politics | no comments

ACPA Call For Commentators for 2013 Pacific APA Group Sessions

[From Dr. Bai Tongdong, ACPA President and Professor of Philosophy, Fudan University]

Dear all,

The Association of Chinese Philosophers in North America (ACPA) will try to host two panels at 2013 Pacific Division Meeting of the American Philosophical Association (APA).  Due to the limitation of space, the second panel might not be accepted by APA (this happens to all group meetings), but we are very hopeful.  Each presentation will have a commentator to comment on.  Please reply to me at baitongdong [at] gmail [dot] com if you are interested in commenting on any of the six presentations we are going to propose to APA.  Thank you for your considerations!
Best wishes,
Tongdong

Association of Chinese Philosophers in North America (ACPA) Group Panels at the APA Pacific Convention

March 27-30, 2013, at the Westin St Francis in San Francisco

  Continue reading “ACPA Call For Commentators for 2013 Pacific APA Group Sessions”

September 18, 2012 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | no comments

Summary of Eastern APA Panels

Several of the APA’s affiliated groups have announced their panels at this December’s Eastern Division APA Meeting, to be held December 27-30, 2012, in Atlanta, GA, USA, at the Marriott Atlanta Marquis. Here is a chronological listing of the ACPA, ISCWP, and ISCP panels. There are sure to be other relevant panels, both group and main program; I will edit this post as more information is available. [UPDATE: I have added new information, and this should now be complete. Oct 12, 2012]

Continue reading “Summary of Eastern APA Panels”

August 20, 2012 Posted by | Conference | one comment

Invitation to Review Books in Chinese for Dao

From Tongdong Bai:

Dear friends,

As you know, one of my duties is the book review editor in Dao.  I am in charge of the Chinese books section.  That is, I am looking for reviewers who can review recently published books in Chinese on Chinese philosophy.  I have come up with a list of noteworthy books that are published in last year (some earlier).  If you are interested in reviewing any one of them, please let me know.  I’ll have a review copy sent to you (for you to keep).  The detailed requirements of the review can be found in a related link toward the bottom of this message.  I’ll attach the list below. Continue reading “Invitation to Review Books in Chinese for Dao”

August 13, 2012 Posted by | Book Review, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Journal Related, Opportunities | no comments

ACPA Nominations Open

JeeLoo Liu, current president of the Association of Chinese Philoosphers in America, writes: Continue reading “ACPA Nominations Open”

November 2, 2011 Posted by | Opportunities, Organization News, Profession | no comments

Contributors

  • Stephen C. Angle (安靖如) (blog administrator) is Professor of Philosophy at Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut. He is a member of both the Philosophy Department and the College of East Asian Studies. Steve has a B.A. in East Asian Studies from Yale University and a Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. Steve’s interests include Neo-Confucianism, contemporary Chinese philosophy, ethics (especially virtue ethics), political philosophy (especially human rights), and the methodology of comparative philosophy. His most recent books are Contemporary Confucian Political Philosophy: Toward Progressive Confucianism (Polity, 2012) and Virtue Ethics and Confucianism, Co-editor with Michael Slote (Routledge, 2013). Contact: sangle@wesleyan.edu.
  • Tongdong Bai is a professor of philosophy at Fudan University in Shanghai. He was trained as a philosopher of physics (Ph.D., Boston University), but he has had an enduring interest in Chinese philosophy.  The latter has been and will be his main area of research.  On the basis of a few articles published in some English journals, he just had a book out in Chinese, in which he tries to show the contemporary and comparative relevance of classical Confucian political philosophy.  The title is, 旧邦新命 —古今中西参照下的古典儒家政治哲学(A New Mission of an Old State: Classical Confucian Political Philosophy in a Comparative and Contemporary Context).
  • Sébastien Billioud is Associate Professor of Chinese civilization in the Far Eastern Studies Department of University Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité. His research focuses on Confucianism in contemporary China with a cross-disciplinary approach in anthropology and intellectual history/philosophy. Contact: sebillioud@yahoo.fr.
  • Brian Bruya teaches Asian philosophy and allied courses at Eastern Michigan University. His long-standing interests are early China, action theory, aesthetics, and cognitive science.
  • Joseph Chan is Professor in the Department of Politics and Public Administration at the University of Hong Kong. He holds an undergraduate degree from the Chinese University of Hong Kong and graduate degrees from the London School of Economics and Oxford University. His research interests include Confucian political philosophy, contemporary liberalism and perfectionism, human rights, Aristotle’s political philosophy, and civil society. Contact: jcwchan@hku.hk.
  • Tim Connolly is Associate Professor of Philosophy at East Stroudsburg University (East Stroudsburg, PA, USA).  His research interests include ancient Greek philosophy, early Confucianism, and comparative philosophy  (a list of his publications is here: http://philpapers.org/profile/26766).  Tim’s book Doing Philosophy Comparatively is being published by Bloomsbury Press this year.
  • Carl J. Dull received a Ph.D. in Philosophy from Southern Illinois University where he studied both Chinese and Western traditions. He has taught at the Nanjing School of Foreign Language and worked for Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth in Nanjing and Hong Kong. His major interest is early Chinese thought, especially Zhuangzi. His dissertation investigates wandering and the heart in Zhuangzi, and proposes various positive ethical ideals for caring for living. His current research looks at early Chinese thought as a resource for moral psychology and therapeutic practice. His previous work includes the power of inspiration in Confucius, the practical compatibility between Confucian principles and Human Rights, and the language games of Zhuangzi and Wittgenstein. Contact: cjdull@gmail.com.
  • David Elstein is assistant professor of philosophy at the State University of New York, New Paltz. He received his B.A. from Oberlin College and M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Michigan, and was a postdoctoral fellow at the Institute of Chinese Literature and Philosophy at Academia Sinica in Taiwan. Though his initial training and research was in pre-Qin thought, recently he has become interested in contemporary Chinese philosophy, particularly Confucian political thought. He has published articles in Philosophy East and West and Dao, and is working on a book examining contemporary Chinese views on Confucianism and democracy.
  • Chris Fraser is Associate Professor in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Hong Kong. He holds an undergraduate degree from Yale University and graduate degrees from National Taiwan University and the University of Hong Kong. His area of specialization is classical Chinese philosophy, though he also works on later Chinese philosophy and has published articles on contemporary Anglo-American epistemology and philosophy of science. He is particularly interested in how early Chinese theories of mind, knowledge, and language intersect with contemporary epistemology, action theory, and ethics. His The Philosophy of the Mozi: The First Consequentialists is forthcoming from Columbia University Press. Contact: fraser@hku.hk.
  • Steve Geisz is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the University of Tampa.  He has a B.A. in Biological Sciences and Philosophy from the University of Maryland Baltimore County and a Ph.D. in Philosophy from Duke University.  His research interests include the philosophy of mind/language, classical Chinese philosophy, and political philosophy. His published work includes articles on the metaphysics of linguistic and mental representation, on Mengzi and philosophy of language, and on strategic voting in three-way elections.  He is currently working on moral psychology and early Confucianism.
  • Paul R. Goldin is Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations at the University of Pennsylvania.  He holds a B.A. and M.A. from the University of Pennsylvania and a Ph.D. from Harvard University.  He is the author of Confucianism (2011), After Confucius: Studies in Early Chinese Philosophy (2005), The Culture of Sex in Ancient China (2002), and Rituals of the Way: The Philosophy of Xunzi (1999); in addition, he has edited the Dao Companion to the Philosophy of Han Fei (2012), as well as the reprint edition of R.H. van Gulik’s Sexual Life in Ancient China (2003), and is currently editing the Wiley-Blackwell Companion to Confucius and the Routledge Handbook of Early Chinese History.  His research focus is intellectual and cultural history, but the study of early China is necessarily interdisciplinary, and his work also involves archaeology, art history, literature, philosophy, and religion.  Contact: prg@sas.upenn.edu.
  • Chad Hansen is Emeritus Professorof Philosophy of the Department of Philosophy at the University of Hong Kong and the author of Language and Logic in Ancient China and A Daoist Theory of Chinese Thought. For more information, see his personal website.
  • Bill Haines is a philosophical dilettante whose most most recent academic position was a postdoc at the University of Hong Kong. He has a Ph.D in ethical theory from Harvard. His publications include “The Purloined Philosopher: Youzi on Learning by Virtue” (Philosophy East & West 58:4), “Confucianism and Moral Intuition” (in Fraser, Robins, & O’Leary, eds., Ethics in Early China, HKU 2011, “Consequentialism” (Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy), “Hedonism and the Variety of Goodness” (Utilitas 22:2), “Aristotle on the Unity of the Just” (Méthexis 2006), and 伦理学:美国制学法  (中国社会科学院, 1994), a handbook for China on how to teach Western ethics, translated into Chinese for him. He is trying to expand a paper on what it is to represent something.
  • Yong Huang, Ph.D in Philosophy (Fudan University) and Th.D in Theology (Harvard University), is a professor of philosophy at Kutztown University of Pennsylvania and the editor of Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy, with an interdisciplinary (philosophical and religious) and comparative (Chinese and Western) in moral (ethical and political) philosophy.
  • Michael Ing is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Religious Studies at Indiana University. He has a master’s degree in theological studies from Harvard Divinity School and a Ph.D. in East Asian Languages and Civilizations from Harvard University. Michael studies the early period of Confucianism (5th century BCE to 2nd century CE), with an emphasis on the Liji. His current book, The Dysfunction of Ritual in Early Confucianism (due out with Oxford University Press in October 2012), analyzes the ways in which the authors of the Liji coped with the possibility that their rituals might fail to create an ordered world. Michael’s interests, from a broader perspective, concern issues vulnerability as they relate to Confucian accounts of the human condition, and Confucian attitudes toward the ability, or inability, of human beings to determine their own welfare. Contact: ming@indiana.edu.
  • Karyn Lai is the author of Introduction to Chinese Philosophy (2008, Cambridge University Press) and Learning from Chinese Philosophies (2006, Ashgate Publishing). Her areas of expertise in Chinese philosophy are in early (pre-Qin) Confucian and Daoist philosophies. Her work is often of a comparative nature, drawing insights from Chinese philosophies to address contemporary ethical issues, including those in environmental ethics. Her current research project investigates reasoning, critical thinking and argumentative strategies in early Chinese Philosophy. She is Co-Editor (with Vincent Shen) of the “Chinese Comparative Philosophy” section of the journal Philosophy Compass, published by Blackwell.
  • Hui-chieh Loy – I am currently Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the National University of Singapore. While my research centers on early Chinese thought (my dissertation was on the moral philosophy of the Mozi “Core Chapters”), I have a continuing interest in ancient Greek thought, early modern and contemporary ethics and political philosophy, among other things. My official web profile is at http://profile.nus.edu.sg/fass/philoyhc/ and you can reach me at philoyhc@nus.edu.sg.
  • Kai Marchal is an associate professor at the Philosophy Department of Soochow University (Taipei). He holds a Ph.D. degree from the University of Munich (Sinology and Philosophy, 2006). While he specializes in Chinese philosophy and intellectual history, he is also interested in Western moral and political theory. His most recent publication is a book on the Song dynasty thinker Lü Zuqian (Die Aufhebung des Politischen, Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 2011). Contact: marchal@scu.edu.tw.
  • Alexus McLeod is an Assistant Professor at the University of Connecticut, specializing in Pre-Qin and Han philosophy (especially Confucianism); also a history, politics, and literature buff, coffee addict, football maniac, and all around “mad, bad, and dangerous to know.” Contact: alexusm@gmail.com
  • Hans-Georg Moeller is Professor and Subject Convenor in the Philosophy and Religious Studies Program at the University of Macau in Macau, China. He is the author of Luhmann Explained (Open Court, 2006), Daoism Explained (Open Court, 2004), The Philosophy of the Daodejing (Columbia, 2006), The Moral Fool: A Case for Amorality (Columbia, 2009), and The Radical Luhmann (Columbia University Press, 2011). Contact: hmoeller@umac.mo
  • Hagop Sarkissian is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at the City University of New York, Baruch College, and the CUNY Graduate Center.  His research is located at the intersection of ethics, cognitive science, and Chinese philosophy.  He is currently working on a book-length treatment of the moral psychology of Confucius and its relevance for contemporary normative ethics.  He spent the fall of 2006 as a Visiting Scholar at the Research Centre for Chinese Philosophy and Culture at the Chinese University of Hong Kong.  Sarkissian holds a BA in Philosophy and a Masters in East Asian Studies from the University of Toronto, and a PhD in Philosophy from Duke University.  He resides in Brooklyn.
  • Aaron Stalnaker is an associate professor of Religious Studies and East Asian Languages and Cultures at Indiana University.  He studies ethics and philosophy of religion, giving serious attention to both Chinese and Western theories and practices.  With regard to Chinese philosophy, he specializes in Warring States thought.  His first book, Overcoming Our Evil: Human Nature and Spiritual Exercises in Xunzi and Augustine (Georgetown University Press, 2006), is a comparative study of different models of moral and religious personal formation.  His current research concerns the ethics of hierarchy and political implications of Confucianism.  He founded and currently co-chairs the Comparative Religious Ethics Group within the American Academy of Religion.  Stalnaker holds a doctorate in Religious Studies from Brown University and a bachelor’s degree in Philosophy and Religious Studies from Stanford University.
  • Justin Tiwald teaches ethics, political philosophy and Chinese philosophy at San Francisco State University. Although he works across the tradition, he’s rather fond of the neo-Confucians and even fonder of their critics.
  • Stephen Walker is a PhD student in Philosophy of Religion at the University of Chicago Divinity School. His research addresses early Chinese intellectual traditions, primarily of the 5th to 3rd centuries BCE. Previous work has focused on philosophy of language, paradox, and skepticism in early Chinese thought, as well as theories of moral psychology and epistemic virtue. He also studies Sanskrit and Indian philosophy, and is an active performer of Chinese classical music.
  • Yang Xiao is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Kenyon College. He has been the Book Review Editor of Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy since 2005. His main research Interests are Ethics and Moral Psychology, Chinese Philosophy, Philosophy of Language, and Political Philosophy. For more information about Yang Xiao, see his website: http://personal.kenyon.edu/xiaoy/
  • Jiyuan Yu teaches ancient Greek and classical Chinese philosophy at SUNY Buffalo; he is especially interested in comparative studies in these two areas. Contact:jyyu@buffalo.edu
  • Jenny Zhao (趙靜一) is a PhD student at the Faculty of Classics in the University of Cambridge. She is interested in pre-Qin Chinese philosophy, ancient Greek philosophy, and comparative studies of the ancient worlds. Her PhD research compares the role of shame and its related concepts in the ethics of Xunzi and Aristotle. Jenny is enthusiastic about classics outreach and inter-cultural exchange by means of introducing the worlds of ancient Greece and Rome to China and promoting the study of Chinese classics in the UK and beyond. Contact: jz292@cam.ac.uk.

(Contributors can access the blog’s internal schedule here.)

January 11, 2008 Posted by | | no comments