Warp, Weft, and Way

Chinese and Comparative Philosophy 中國哲學與比較哲學

A ground-breaking book on Chinese political philosophy

…by me, of course!

Here is a link: http://www.amazon.com/China-Political-Philosophy-Kingdom-Theories/dp/1780320752

And, my own objective view is well supported by a very authoritative voice (based upon the number of posts here, this voice must have been the most authoritative in Chinese philosophy):

“Tongdong Bai’s new book pulls off a remarkable balancing act. It is accessible and yet provocative; it is solidly based on China’s early history and yet full of fascinating comparisons with Western thought and with the contemporary world. It is a splendid introduction to Chinese philosophy for all readers.” – Stephen C. Angle, Wesleyan University

Now that you’ve seen my ego (too much of it, I guess), let me be modest for a moment. In this book, I argue that the Chinese transitions from the Western Zhou to the Qin dynasty were comparable with European modernization in many ways. The pre-Qin thinkers, then, were addressing problems of modernity. One implication of this crazy claim is that pre-Qin Chinese philosophy is first and foremost a political philosophy. Since they are about problems of modernity, the contemporary relevance of pre-Qin philosophical ideas is then apparent.

And now is your turn to show how crazy I must have been! (If you wish to trash my book in the form of book review, please let me know, and I’d be happy to arrange a copy to be sent to you.)

December 13th, 2012 Posted by | Books of Interest, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | 5 comments

5 Responses to A ground-breaking book on Chinese political philosophy

  1. Steve Angle says:

    Hi Tongdong — I am pleased that our move to the new server, thus making the blog accessible in China, has unleashed you. 🙂 Welcome. We look forward to further posts and comments from you.

    Reply
  2. Manyul Im says:

    Yes; the work to get a new server will have been worth the effort if more readers in China are aware of the blog and become participants in it. Your book looks great, Tongdong. I’m looking forward to reading it.

    Reply
  3. baitongdong says:

    Thanks, Steve and Manyul. Now that it is convenient for me to come here, I’ll bark from time to time.

    Reply
  4. Hock G. Tjoa says:

    I would be interested in reading and reviewing your book. I studied “intellectual history” at Harvard (Ph.D., 1972), but it was of European ideas. In the last ten years, I have turned to Chinese subjects and recently translated selections of the Romance of the Three Kingdoms as The Battle of Chibi. My email is tjoa.books@gmail.com if you wish to send me a copy of your work.

    Reply
  5. Ben Huff says:

    I very much agree that the pre-Qin philosophers are struggling with key problems of modernity! This is part of why I think Confucian thought has so much to add to Western work on the virtues, where the best sources (Plato, Aristotle) have a rather pre-modern sensibility. I hope I’ll get a good look at your book soon.

    Reply

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