Warp, Weft, and Way

Chinese and Comparative Philosophy 中國哲學與比較哲學

Important Survey?

Valerie Tiberius recently sent out a survey link via the APA about “what matters to philosophers.” There is a substantial portion devoted to the marginalization of certain fields and methods. I recommend that anyone who wants Asian fields to play a more prominent role in the profession use this survey to take one small step in that direction. See the message and link below.

Continue reading “Important Survey?”

August 12, 2016 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | no comments

CFP Techniques for Teaching Comparatively

 

Society for Teaching Comparative Philosophy
Call for Papers for a Panel at the American Association of Philosophy Teachers
Saginaw Valley State University
Saginaw, Michigan
July 27–31, 2016

One of the founding goals of the Society for Teaching Comparative Philosophy is to help non-
specialists integrate comparative resources into their classrooms. To help further this goal, we’d like to
organize a panel at this summer’s American Association of Philosophy Teachers’ Workshop/Conference
at Saginaw Valley State University, July 27th -31st. We’re looking for your help in sharing the importance
of comparative resources in the introductory classroom!

We are looking for proposals involving a unit from your introductory courses that is comparative. In
addition, to speak to all of our colleagues, we would like a panel that represents the breadth of
philosophical activity across analytic, continental, and historical methodologies. These approaches can be
text-based, problem-based, and involve any pedagogical styles you are currently using.

Please send your abstract (350 word max), including name, affiliation, a brief description of the unit, and
the methodologies it fits in to a.b.creller@unf.edu by February 10th . The conference website and
information can be found at http://philosophyteachers.org/extended-deadline-cfp-2016/ and information
about the Society for Teaching Comparative Philosophy can be found at stcp.weebly.com.

January 16, 2016 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | 5 comments

National Taiwan University Graduate Conference Call for Papers

Call for Papers
Philosophy and the World: International Conference for Graduates
Department of Philosophy, National Taiwan University

National Taiwan University is proud to host its annual graduate conference of philosophy on 2016/05/14-15. This year’s theme is “Philosophy and the World.” The conference will be conducted in both Chinese and English. We invite all potential participants to join us on this complex yet exciting journey of collaborating across cultures and languages. We welcome all paper submissions by graduate students (master’s and doctoral students) and post doctoral students . This year’s theme centers around five main axes:
1. Chinese philosophy, including Pre-Qin philosophy, Confucianism, Daoism, Yijing philosophy etc.
2. Buddhist philosophy, especially Buddhist Philosophy of Sex and Gender, Buddhist Ethics of life, Buddhist logic.
3. Applied philosophy, including Philosophy of Science, Philosophy of Political Science, Applied Ethics, philosophy of religion, philosophy of social science, etc.
4. German philosophy, including Hermeneutics and Phenomenology.
5. Analytic philosophy, including metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, metaethics, virtue ethics, logic, philosophical logic, and philosophy of language, Bayesian epistemology, formal epistemology, epistemic logic.

Papers related to the above themes are particularly encouraged, but other topics are also welcome and will be considered as long as they fulfill our submission requirements (see below). Exemplary papers may be published following the conference. The philosophy department at National Taiwan University will provide participants traveling from overseas with financial support for hotel accommodations for three nights (5/13-5/15). The Conference Committee regrets that we are unable to provide travel and breakfast stipends for participants.

Submissions should include:
1. Title of paper
2. Abstract (one page, 300-500 words, PDF format)
3. Application form

Please fill out the application form provided and email it along with the other required documents to Mr. Liu at liuchengming@ntu.edu.tw by 2015/12/22. You will receive a reply within three working days to confirm receipt of your submission. Results will be sent out on 2016/01/29. The full text of accepted papers must be submitted by 2016/04/08 otherwise the paper’s acceptance will be forfeited. For more information, please visit our site at http://philosophyntu.wix.com/philoandworld.

October 11, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | one comment

Statistics on Asian Philosophy Panels at the 2015 Pacific APA

This last Saturday evening, I was carping to a colleague about the fact that three panels on Chinese philosophy were scheduled simultaneously during the very last time slot of the Group Program of the Pacific APA. Now that the APA has distributed a link to the evaluation survey, I decided to take a look at the actual numbers to see if there is a genuine issue of equity at the conference.

Below are the stats that I got from a first-time run-through of the main and group programs (I’m concerned with Asian philosophy broadly, which I categorized, following the panel titles or society names, as Chinese, Buddhist, Japanese, Comparative, and Martial Arts (didn’t see Indian, alas!)).

Continue reading “Statistics on Asian Philosophy Panels at the 2015 Pacific APA”

April 6, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Indian Philosophy, Japanese philosophy | 2 comments

Call for Papers and Panels: SACP at the APA East 2016

CALL FOR PAPER AND PANEL PROPOSALS

Including for a Special Workshop on How to Incorporate Asian Texts into Traditional Philosophy Courses

2016 Eastern Division Meeting of the American Philosophical Association

January 6-9, 2016, Washington, DC

The Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy welcomes proposals for our panels at the American Philosophical Association’s Eastern Division meeting. Proposals regarding any aspect of Asian or comparative philosophy are welcome.

This year, we especially welcome paper and panel proposals for a Special Workshop on How to Incorporate Asian Texts into Traditional Philosophy Courses. Workshop papers should be targeted at non-Asianists who want to incorporate Asian texts into a traditional philosophy course. Proposals for incorporating Asian texts into courses in any area of philosophy are welcome, including ethics, epistemology, metaphysics, aesthetics, introductory courses, philosophy of religion, philosophy of mind, moral psychology, logic, environmental philosophy, philosophy of gender, philosophy of law, social/political philosophy, etc.

Whether for the special workshop or other areas of Asian and comparative philosophy, please submit individual paper abstracts or complete panel proposals.

Paper abstracts should be 150-200 words in length.

Complete panel proposals should include: panel title, a 150 word introduction to the theme of the panel, and a 150 word abstract for each of the papers.

Include each presenter’s name, e-mail address, and institutional affiliation.

No simultaneous submissions, please.

Please submit these materials no later than May 7 to Brian Bruya at bbruya@emich.edu.

February 19, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | no comments

Workshop: Infusing Asian Philosophy into the Traditional Curriculum

Hey, Everyone,

I’m the program chair for the SACP panels at the APA East meeting, and I’m thinking of running a workshop for non-Asianists who want to include some Asian philosophy in the classroom.

The reason I’m writing is that I’m looking for ideas.

First let me tell you how I’m thinking about it. Suppose you could choose one text to include in a traditional philosophical anthology. The anthology would be in any specific area of philosophy or would be a basic introductory text. You would get to choose a short piece to represent any part of any Asian tradition that could be covered in one class period. That’s the first part of how to think about it. The second part of how to think of it would be: now what if a colleague came and asked you how to teach that text in the classroom? How would you explain it, or what kind of extra resources would you provide (in a reasonable amount) so that a non-Asianist could competently teach it without having to get a degree in it?

So, given those two ways of framing the issue, how should I approach this kind of panel? Should I open it to all Asian philosophy in general? Or should I focus on a specific philosophical area, such as ethics or epistemology? If the latter, which area would be a good first candidate?

Have any of your colleagues every shown an interest in such a thing? I broached the topic with a couple of colleagues today. One said that he’d be interested in a text from the Chinese tradition that he could use for an Intro class and would love to know how to teach it. Another said he’d be interested in an epistemology text from any non-Western tradition.

Do you think this kind of panel would garner any interest from non-Asianists at the meeting? Would people show up for a workshop on how to infuse Asian works of philosophy into their classrooms?

Finally, would any of you have an interest in answering this kind of call for papers? This would be pretty basic stuff from a specialist’s perspective.

Or is it a really bad idea to think that some non-Asianist could sit through a thirty minute lecture on an Asian text and then be competent to teach it?

Or is it a bad idea because we’d be ceding our turf?

All ideas are welcome. Feel free to shoot me down.

February 4, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Conference, Courses | 15 comments

New Chinese Philosophy Postdoc Opportunity at Michigan

Funded by the Tang Junyi Lecture Fund and administered by the Department of Asian Languages & Cultures (ALC) and the Lieberthal-Rogel Center for Chinese Studies (LRCCS) at the University of Michigan, the Tang Junyi Postdoctoral Fellowship is open to scholars conducting well-designed research and writing projects on Chinese philosophy. One (1) fellow will be selected.

Eligibility:

– Research topics can cover any aspect of Chinese philosophy and philosophical thought.

– Candidates must be able to provide evidence of successful completion of their PhD degree by June of the year of appointment and may not be more than seven (7) years beyond receipt of the PhD.

– Applicants who do not have native command of English must include the date and score of the most recent TOEFL examination or other evidence of proficiency in English (such as a degree from a US university or a letter from an academic advisor).

Continue reading “New Chinese Philosophy Postdoc Opportunity at Michigan”

December 23, 2014 Posted by | Academia, Fellowships, Opportunities | no comments

SACP Panels at the Upcoming APA East Meeting

The Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy will host two panels at the upcoming APA conference in Philadelphia.  If you are going to the conference be sure not to miss these two panels of outstanding scholars.

December 27th, 6:30 – 9:30 p.m.
Panel GI-5
Topic: Philosophy of Language in Early China
Chair: Susan Blake
Speakers:
Jane Geaney (University of Richmond): “A Language Crisis? Early Chinese Metalinguistic Terms from a Comparative Perspective”
Dan Robins (University of Hong Kong): “Later Mohist Nominalism”
Susan Blake (Indiana University): “Disputation and Names in the Zhuangzi”
Stephen Walker (University of Chicago): “Systematically Misleading Expressions in Zhuangzi 25”

 

December 29th, 1:30 – 4:30 p.m.
Panel GIX-3
Topic: Comparative Perspectives in East Asian Philosophy
Chair: James McRae
Speakers:
Ai Yuan (University of Oxford): “Embracing the Unavoidable: Zhiming (知命) in Mencius and Zhuangzi”
Brad Cokelet (University of Miami): “Spontaneous Agency and Neo-Kantian Constitutivism”
Paul D’Ambrosio (East China Normal University): “Justice vs. Harmony: Li Zehou’s Historical Approach to Global Ethics”
Hwa Yeong Wang (Binghamton University): “A Feminist Reconstruction of Emotions in Korean Neo-Confucianism”
James McRae (Westminster College): “From Kyōsei to Kyōei: Symbiotic Flourishing in Japanese Environmental Ethics”

December 20, 2014 Posted by | American Philosophical Association, Conference | no comments

Review of new book from Bongrae Seok

SEOK, Bongrae, Embodied Moral Psychology and Confucian Philosophy
Lanham: Lexington Books, 2013, xvi + 197 pages

How can Confucian philosophy provide a useful path toward understanding the basic
processes of human moral psychology? This is the question that SEOK Bongrae’s new
book Embodied Moral Psychology and Confucian Philosophy strives to answer.
To the uninitiated, Confucian philosophy will be an unlikely resource, even an
anachronism with respect to current issues in philosophy, especially with regard to
issues in cognitive science and the philosophy of mind. However, a revival of
Confucian ideas is taking place, with articles, conferences, monographs, and edited
volumes devoted to its relevance to a variety of areas of current philosophy, both
analytic and continental. Seok’s book is a fine example from this trend. Trained in the
philosophy of mind and cognitive science at the University of Arizona, Seok has turned
to the Confucian tradition for insights that can extend our understanding of how the
human mind makes moral decisions.

Seok divides his book into two parts. The first is a background on embodied
cognition and how Confucian philosophy is a natural candidate for explorations of
embodiment. The second explores and elucidates particular aspects of Confucian moral
psychology and then brings them into dialogue with current debates in moral psychology,
specifically, with regard to the character/situationist debate. In the five chapters of
these two sections, Seok makes a convincing case for the importance of what he calls
situated Confucian virtue. …

Full review can be found here: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11712-014-9411-0?sa_campaign=email/event/articleAuthor/onlineFirst

November 7, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | no comments

New Funding Opportunity for Ph.D. Students

The Institute of International Education, which administers the Fulbright Program,  just announced a new award for Ph.D. students wishing to do research in China, and philosophy is included as one of the disciplines.

The announcement is here: http://www.iie.org/Programs/Confucius-China-Studies-Program

This new program, called the Confucius China Studies Program, is funded by, you guessed it, the Confucius Institute.  This could be a great opportunity for anyone wishing to do Ph.D. research in China.

August 25, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | no comments

EACS Censorship Affair

Inside Higher Ed just published an article on the censorship of the EACS program earlier this year–already mentioned on this site.

August 6, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | one comment

Zhuangzi in the Reserve

Some Zhuangzi in this quote and a bit of Zen at the end:

Bee-eating Wasps… feed their larvae on Hive-bees, whom they catch on the flowers while gathering pollen and honey.  If the Wasp who has made a capture feels that her Bee is swollen with honey, she never fails, before stinging her, to squeeze her crop, either on the way or at the entrance of the dwelling, so as to make her disgorge the delicious syrup, which she drinks by licking the tongue which her unfortunate victim, in her death-agony, sticks out of her mouth at full length…. At the moment of some such horrible banquet, I have seen the Wasp, with her prey, seized by the Mantis: the bandit was rifled by another bandit.  And here is an awful detail: while the Mantis held her transfixed under the points of the double saw and was already munching her belly, the Wasp continued to lick the honey of her Bee.   (J. Henri Fabre, The Insect World of J. Henri Fabre, p. 57)

Whenever I read something from a scientist that so intriguingly echoes a passage from early China, it gets me wondering about the powers of observation in the early writers.  Did Zhuangzi spend extended periods of time just observing, as did Fabre?  Fabre was a self-taught entomologist in the nineteenth century famous for staking out insects and reporting on their behavior.  Although an acute observer, he is not averse to a bit of anthropomorphizing and even has a nice literary appeal (at least in the translation of Alexander Teixeira de Mattos).

August 4, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | no comments

Munro on Social Justice

Those interested in how traditional Chinese ethical theory may be relevant to contemporary issues of social justice will want to read this series of posts by Donald Munro: http://www.triplepundit.com/2014/07/human-values-corporate-social-impact-case-jpmorgan-chase/

July 27, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | no comments

New Fulbright Opportunities in Taiwan

See the attached announcement in the following link for an explanation of a number of new Fulbright opportunities in Taiwan: for recent graduates, M.A. students, K-12 teachers, post-docs, and seasoned scholars:  Fulbright Taiwan.

June 30, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | no comments

Fulbright Opportunities

The American Fulbright Program is a scholar exchange program that brings scholars and students from overseas to the United States and sends scholars and students from the United States overseas.

There are a large number of programs for the countries of East Asia.  If you are an American citizen and are a new university graduate (or will be next year), you are eligible for programs to teach English abroad or to engage in study/research programs.  Professors should circulate this information to students.

If you are an American scholar, there are many research and teaching opportunities.

Awards generally cover all expenses (including airfare) and include stipends.

I have attached three introductory documents to this message.

Teaching English

Graduate and undergraduate students

Scholar and Other

You can find all of the programs here: http://www.iie.org/fulbright.

The announcements for the next round of programs have just come out.  Many of the deadlines are August 1.

May 7, 2014 Posted by | Academia, Opportunities | no comments

Slingerland on the Radio

Ted Slingerland is out promoting his new book, Trying Not to Try and is on a radio talk show.  I ‘m listening to it right now on public radio’s On Point.  Here’s the website.  Mike Csikszentmihalyi is on, as well.

 

April 2, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | no comments

MA at Eastern Michigan University

I am pleased to announce that the Philosophy program at Eastern Michigan University has a new M.A. program.  The program has strengths in  Chinese and comparative philosophy, gender & sexuality, philosophy of science, philosophical counseling, social philosophy, food justice, and environmental ethics.

We are located in Southeastern Michigan, about 40 minutes west of Detroit and 10 minutes east of Ann Arbor.

We are now accepting applications for 2014-2015.

Please visit our website for more information.  We are also listed in the APA Graduate Guide.

Feel free to email me with any questions.

 

March 8, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | one comment

Chinese Philosophy in the New APA Journal

The APA sent out an announcement with the first CFP for their new journal, and it is worth noting that two of the eighteen Advisory Editors have specialties in Chinese philosophy.  This marks a significant advance for our field, and I hope that everyone will consider it as an avenue for bringing Chinese philosophy to a more mainstream readership.

Continue reading “Chinese Philosophy in the New APA Journal”

March 5, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | no comments

SACP at the APA East

CALL FOR PAPER AND PANEL PROPOSALS

2014 Eastern Division Meeting of the American Philosophical Association

December 27-30, 2014, Philadelphia, PA

The Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy welcomes proposals for our panels at the American Philosophical Association’s Eastern Division meeting.  Please submit individual paper abstracts or complete panel proposals.

Paper abstracts should be 150-200 words in length.

Complete panel proposals should include: panel title, a 150 word introduction to the theme of the panel, and a 150 word abstract for each of the papers.

Include each presenter’s name, e-mail address, and institution.

Proposals regarding any aspect of Asian or comparative philosophy are welcome.  No simultaneous submissions.

Please submit these materials no later than May 7 to Brian Bruya at bbruya@emich.edu.

February 7, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | no comments

MLA CFP

Message from MLA:

………………………..

Call for Papers

MLA 2015 in Vancouver

I am writing on behalf of the MLA Division for East Asian Languages and
Literatures after 1900. In the interests of promoting the participation of
Asianists in the Modern Languages Association, we would like to pass on
the MLA’s call for panel proposals to our colleagues in the field. While

Continue reading “MLA CFP”

January 22, 2014 Posted by | Call for Papers (CFP), Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | no comments

Diversity at APA

For those who attended the APA Eastern meeting this year, the APA just sent out an online survey, part of which has to do with diversity issues.  I’d like to suggest that those who are concerned about the lack of non-Western philosophy in the main program include mention of this at the end of the survey.  They seem to view diversity mainly with regard to people, but I think it should be extended to include fields.

Just a thought.

 

January 6, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | no comments

SACP Panels at the APA East, 2013

 

SUNDAY AFTERNOON, DECEMBER 29th
GIX-7. Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy
2:45-5:45 p.m.
Topic:  Comparative Approaches to Ethics, Politics, and Language: Sentimentalism, Human Rights, and Right Action
Chair: Ian Sullivan
Speakers:
  • Benedict Chan, “How Does the Capability Approach Contribute to the Debate Between Confucianism and Liberalism on Human Rights?”
  • Christina Chuang, “East and West Moral Sentimentalism: Hutcheson and Mencius”
  • Bryan Kimoto, “Time and Space: Levinas and Watsuji on the Ethical Metaphysics of Persons”
  • Mathew Foust, “Bushido and Royce: Japanese Samurai Ethics and the Philosophy of Loyalty”
  • Yumi Suzuki, “‘Saying’ as Action: Philosophy of Language in the Zhuangzi”
MONDAY AFTERNOON, DECEMBER 30th
GXII-4.  Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy
1:30-4:30 p.m.
Topic: Reclassification and Recontextualization in Comparative Philosophy
Chair: Christina Chuang
Speakers:
  • Laura Specker Sullivan, “Nishida and the Moral Will”
  • Ben Zenk , “Nāgārjuna’s MMK: An Instance of Upāya?”
  • Kyle Peters, “Beyond Emptiness: Nishida’s Fusionary Approach to Art”
  • Ian Sullivan, “Relational Autonomy in Confucian Ethics and Care Ethics”
  • Rika Dunlap, “Hope and the Recontextualization of History in Miki Kiyoshi’s Later Philosophy of Activity”

December 26, 2013 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | no comments

Ancient Philosophy Conference – Call for Papers

Conference on Ancient philosophy that explicitly invites papers from all traditions.  Looks like a great opportunity, in a great setting.

THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Hosts
The Second Canadian Colloquium
for Ancient Philosophy
May 2–4, 2014

The University of British Columbia warmly invites the submission of proposals in either French or English for individual papers and poster presentations for the Second Canadian Colloquium for Ancient Philosophy. We invite submissions in all areas of Ancient Philosophy (including Graeco-Roman, Indian, and Chinese traditions), and we welcome submissions from graduate and postgraduate students.

The list of confirmed speakers and roundtable presenters includes:

  • Hugh Benson (University of Oklahoma)
  • Margaret Cameron (University of Victoria)
  • Christopher Framarin (University of Calgary)
  • Doug Hutchinson (University of Toronto)
  • Lloyd P. Gerson (University of Toronto)
  • Annie Larivée (Carleton  University)
  • Monte Ransome Johnson (University of California, San Diego)
  • Jean-Marc Narbonne (Laval University)

Full CFP is here.

December 10, 2013 Posted by | Call for Papers (CFP), Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Conference | no comments

Reminder of Call for Papers for SACP at the APA East

Reminder of call for papers for SACP at the APA East.
……………….

CALL FOR PAPER AND PANEL PROPOSALS

2013 Eastern Division Conference of the American Philosophical Association

December 27-30, 2013, Baltimore, MD – Marriott Waterfront

The Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy welcomes proposals for our panels at the American Philosophical Association’s Eastern Division meeting.  Please submit individual paper abstracts or complete panel proposals.

Paper abstracts should be 150-200 words in length.

Complete panel proposals should include: panel title, a 150 word introduction to the theme of the panel, and a 150 word abstract for each of the papers.

Include each presenter’s name, e-mail address, and institution.

Proposals regarding any aspect of Asian or comparative philosophy are welcome.

Please submit these materials no later than May 7 to Brian Bruya at bbruya@emich.edu.

April 28, 2013 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | no comments

Fulbright Taiwan

Some information for professors (U.S. citizenship) who might be interested.

I met today with the executive director of Fulbright Taiwan and the chair of the Department of Philosophy at National Taiwan University, where I am currently doing a teaching Fulbright. Both of them expressed the sentiment that this is a good association and that the U.S.-Taiwan relationship would be well-served by continuing it. Fulbright depends on the initiative of applicants, however, rather than putting out calls for participation. So they can only accommodate a philosopher if a philosopher applies. A special interest was expressed for political philosophy, especially related to the potential democratization of China. (I’m teaching American Pragmatism and Comparative Moral Psychology–at the graduate level.)  They both thought it would be a good idea to get the word out on this blog.

Continue reading “Fulbright Taiwan”

March 29, 2013 Posted by | Academia, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Opportunities, Philosophy in Taiwan, Profession | 2 comments

Call for Papers: SACP at the Eastern APA, 2013

CALL FOR PAPER AND PANEL PROPOSALS

2013 Eastern Division Conference of the American Philosophical Association

December 27-30, 2013, Baltimore, MD – Marriott Waterfront

The Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy welcomes proposals for our panels at the American Philosophical Association’s Eastern Division meeting.  Please submit individual paper abstracts or complete panel proposals.

Paper abstracts should be 150-200 words in length.

Complete panel proposals should include: panel title, a 150 word introduction to the theme of the panel, and a 150 word abstract for each of the papers.

Include each presenter’s name, e-mail address, and institution.

Proposals regarding any aspect of Asian or comparative philosophy are welcome.

Please submit these materials no later than May 7 to Brian Bruya at bbruya@emich.edu.

February 23, 2013 Posted by | Call for Papers (CFP), Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Conference | no comments

Teacher Training for Confucian Studies

The Nishan program for undergraduates has been announced here.  Below is an announcement for the program that is tailored to instructors.

***

We are pleased to introduce the Third Annual Nishan Confucian Studies Summer Institute at theNishan Birthplace of the Sage Academy in Shandong, China, July 6 to August 3, 2013.

 

This month-long training program for teachers of Chinese culture will be led by professors Roger T. Ames (University of Hawaii), Sor-hoon Tan (National University of Singapore) and Tian Chenshan(Beijing Foreign Studies University), with a special series of lectures by Henry Rosemont, Jr.(Brown University), Zhang Xianglong (Beijing University), Hans-Georg Moeller (University College Cork), and Robin Wang (Loyola Marymount University).

Continue reading “Teacher Training for Confucian Studies”

February 13, 2013 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | 3 comments

West-East Cooperation

This is related to Steve’s post about the recent APA panel on embodied cognition.  But since my question strays a bit away from that, I thought I’d start a new thread.

First, thanks, Steve, for the great information, especially for the link to the participants of the summer institute!  (And, Steve, do have an equivalent participants list from your Virtue Ethics summer institute?)

If anyone can help, I’m interested in knowing more about Western specialists who are dipping into non-Western philosophy, especially Chinese philosophy.

I know of Owen Flanagan and Michael Slote, of course. I also know that Karyn Lai and Stephen Hetherington are working together. Previously, there have been Hall & Ames (in Chinese and political philosophy) and Lloyd & Sivin (on the edge of philosophy). David Wong and Joel Kupperman each made names for themselves first on the Western side but have found inspiration from the Eastern side (as well have having done significant work on the Eastern side in the case of Wong).

What other kinds of openness to East-West cooperation is happening from the Western side?

Further, this blog has discussed the dearth of Ph.D. programs in Chinese philosophy, but what about other avenues for training/cooperation?  The NEH summer institutes mentioned above are great examples.  Are there others–for folks with a Ph.D. in a Western specialty but who want to know more about Asian philosophy?  I know that for instruction, the Asian Studies Development Program has been holding summer institutes for college and university faculty who want to infuse Asian content into the undergraduate curriculum generally.  There is also the Nishan Confucian Studies Summer Institute for teachers.  What else is going on?  Who is cooperating with whom?  Which Western specialists are dipping into Asian philosophy?  What avenues do they have for cooperation or training?  Which Asian specialists are successfully reaching out to their Western colleagues?

Any information would be appreciated.

 

January 3, 2013 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | 11 comments

SACP Panels at the APA East

Chinese philosophy panels sponsored by the SACP at the Eastern APA:

Continue reading “SACP Panels at the APA East”

December 27, 2012 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | one comment

Ph.D. Supervisors

I am writing a short piece on the state of Chinese Philosophy in American Philosophy Ph.D. programs (yes, I’m aware of the APA Newsletter report from a few years back and of the discussions on the predecessor to this blog).

By my count, there are presently a total of six Philosophy Ph.D. programs in the U.S. that have specialists on their faculty who are capable of supervising a Ph.D. dissertation with a focus on Chinese Philosophy:

  • DePaul: Franklin Perkins
  • Duke: David Wong
  • Hawai’i: Roger Ames and Chung-ying Cheng
  • Oklahoma: Amy Olberding
  • SUNY Buffalo: Jiyuan Yu
  • Utah: Eric Hutton

There are other ways of going about getting a Ph.D. in Chinese Philosophy (Ziporyn at Chicago, Schwitzgebel and Raphals at Riverside, not to mention programs outside the U.S.–and there are M.A. possibilities, etc.), but I am keeping my focus just on philosophers in Philosophy departments who are capable on their own of supervising Ph.D. dissertations in Chinese Philosophy.

Have I missed anybody?

 

 

December 11, 2012 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | 12 comments

Comparative Philosophy Seminar

I’m working up a syllabus for a seminar in  Comparative Philosophy for a new M.A. program that we are starting at E.M.U. (not official yet, but almost there).  Below is what I have come up with for my first draft.  If you have taught a course in Comparative Philosophy, or have contemplated doing so, I’d appreciate any feedback you can offer with regard to readings and topics.

As for the readings that have been included, you can see that I construe the overall subject matter fairly broadly (or do I?).

The course is divided roughly into two halves.  The first half covers issues in comparative philosophy.  The second half is broken further into two sections, the first of which covers actual examples of doing comparative philosophy; and the second of which covers classic texts that provide good opportunities for comparative analysis–to give the students an opportunity to practice and thereby realize first hand the many issues and difficulties involved.  The last few weeks are devoted to readings that propose how to use comparative methods to make advances in current philosophy.  I’ll probably swap those readings out for readings from an anthology that I am working on at the moment–the theme of which is using the resources of the Chinese tradition to advance issues in current philosophy.

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December 2, 2012 Posted by | Comparative philosophy | 15 comments

Chair a Panel at Eastern APA

The Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy invites volunteers to chair its two panels at the Eastern APA in December, 2012.  The panels are: 1) Language, Law, and Spirituality in Early China and 2) Mind and World in Classical Chinese Philosophy.  If you are interested, please contact panel coordinator, Brian Bruya: bbruya@emich.edu.

June 11, 2012 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | no comments

SACP Announces Panels at Eastern APA

The Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy has announced its two panels for the Eastern APA, as follows:

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August 21, 2011 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Conference | no comments

Which Resources Do You Recommend for Interpreting Classical Chinese Terminology?

This is a follow-up to Manyul’s recent post about the TLS.

I’m wondering whether professors of Chinese philosophy at English-speaking universities encourage their students to begin to access terms in the original Chinese.  Perhaps it would be as simple as referring them to the glossary in the back of Ivanhoe and Van Norden’s Readings in Classical Chinese Philosophy and then prompting them to be aware of those key terms in their reading, or it could be as complex as asking them to research a particular term across various texts.

There are a couple of reasons for asking.  The first is that I have a belief that beginning to entertain the notion that there is more to a Chinese term’s semantic field than is represented in any particular translation yields a more profitable understanding for the student, and (assuming others hold the same belief) I’m curious about how others go about encouraging that.  The second is that the potential of computing power to help in this regard is now quite high, and so I am wondering how electronic resources may be playing a role.  The perspective I’m looking for is that of the professor who is teaching the student who is not competent in Chinese.

There are also other perspectives that will be different but just as illuminating for me:  Continue reading “Which Resources Do You Recommend for Interpreting Classical Chinese Terminology?”

July 1, 2011 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Pedagogy | 6 comments