Author Archives: Justin Tiwald

Bay Area Conference on Chinese Thought — deadline extended

Thor Harris and I have received several good abstracts for next year’s meeting of the Bay Area Conference on Chinese Thought (BACCT), but we could use a few more to round out the group. Please note that BACCT is meant for presenting works in progress as well as finished papers. Scholars working on Chinese thought from any disciplinary approach are welcome. And student presentations are also welcome, so please notify your grad students.

The conference will be held at the University of California Davis on October 14-15, 2017. Those interested in participating should submit an abstract of no more than one single-spaced page, along with a CV, in Word or PDF format. Please email these to Justin Tiwald <jtiwald@sfsu.edu> and Thor Harris <thorr@ucdavis.edu> with the subject line “BACCT Submission.” The deadline for submissions has been extended to May 30, 2017.

Dissertation Workshops on Comparative Political Theory

Shortly before the next American Political Science Association meeting in San Francisco, the organization will host dissertation workshops, one of which is devoted to students working in comparative political theory. The workshops group six ABD students together with two scholars. The deadline to apply is May 15. The workshops will take place on August 30, the day before the main APSA meeting commences. More information is here.

 

April 15 Deadline for Bay Area Conference on Chinese Thought

Just a quick reminder that the deadline for the Bay Area Conference on Chinese Thought (BACCT) is April 15. The event will take place at UC Davis on October 14-15. More information below!

 

Thor Harris and I are pleased to announce the inaugural meeting of the Bay Area Conference on Chinese Thought (BACCT), which will meet annually at various Bay Area institutions of higher education beginning in 2017. BACCT is modeled on the highly successful regional cross-disciplinary conference series on Chinese thought in the Northeast and Midwest. Like those, the aim is is provide a forum for scholars to present their work, develop networks with other scholars in the area, and examine issues in Chinese thought from different disciplinary perspectives. Although the conferences will be held in the Bay Area (broadly construed), all scholars of Chinese thought are welcome to attend.

Individual presentations will likely be twenty minutes in length, grouped into panels that will aim to bring out inter-disciplinary connections. Continue reading →

CFP: 1st Annual Bay Area Conference on Chinese Thought

Thor Harris and I are pleased to announce the inaugural meeting of the Bay Area Conference on Chinese Thought (BACCT), which will meet annually at various Bay Area institutions of higher education beginning in 2017. BACCT is modeled on the highly successful regional cross-disciplinary conference series on Chinese thought in the Northeast and Midwest. Like those, the aim is is provide a forum for scholars to present their work, develop networks with other scholars in the area, and examine issues in Chinese thought from different disciplinary perspectives. Although the conferences will be held in the Bay Area (broadly construed), all scholars of Chinese thought are welcome to attend.

Individual presentations will likely be twenty minutes in length, grouped into panels that will aim to bring out inter-disciplinary connections. Continue reading →

New Book: Dao Companion to the Philosophy of Xunzi

xunzi_dao-companion

 

I am pleased to share the news that Eric Hutton’s much-anticipated Dao Companion to the Philosophy of Xunzi has been published. Click here for more information and to download the back matter and front matter for free (this includes the introduction).

A list of chapters and contributors is below the fold.

Continue reading →

Another Round on Chinese Thought as Philosophy

In case you missed it, Nicholas Tampio recently published a short piece in Aeon explaining why he thinks Confucius (among other non-Western thinkers) should not be regarded as a philosopher, with implications for the philosophy curriculum and the makeup of philosophy faculties. This is a response to the recent New York Times piece by Jay Garfield and Bryan Van Norden.  Tampio and Van Norden subsequently exchanged tweets on the topic. Amy Olberding replies thoroughly and with humor here, and Ethan Mills responds on behalf of Indian philosophy here.

Where to begin?

Continue reading →

In Memoriam: David S. Nivison (1923-2014)

American sinologist and philosopher David Nivison passed away on the 16th of this month. Nivison was a true polymath and made tremendous contributions to a variety of fields that overlapped with Chinese thought and history. For most readers of this blog, he will perhaps be best remembered for his contributions to Chinese philosophy, which was greatly enriched by his work on Daoists and Confucian philosophers across history, including the classical period as well as the Song, Ming and Qing dynasties. For much of his adult life, he also served as one of a small handful of scholars working on Chinese thought under the aegis of a Western philosophy department, and played a major role in integrating Chinese philosophy with contemporary philosophy as practiced in the English-speaking world. Among his best-known books are The Life and Thought of Chang Hsueh-ch’eng, The Ways of Confucianism, and The Riddle of the Bamboo Annals.

There are two substantial obituaries available on-line. One in English and the other in Chinese. The latter includes a nice collection of photographs.