Author Archives: karynlai

Call for Registration – Curing through Questioning: Philosophy as Therapy Across Ancient Traditions and Modern Applications

Call for Registration – Curing through Questioning: Philosophy as Therapy Across Ancient Traditions and Modern Applications

1st-2nd June 2019
Sultan Nazrin Shah Centre
Worcester College, University of Oxford

Registration is open for a two-day interdisciplinary conference – ‘Curing through Questioning: Philosophy as Therapy Across Ancient Traditions and Modern Applications’ – to take place on 1st-2nd June 2019 at the Sultan Nazrin Shah Centre in Worcester College, University of Oxford.

We are glad to confirm the following invited speakers:

Amber D. Carpenter (Yale-NUS College)
Jessica Frazier (University of Oxford)
Barbara Jikai Gabrys (Zen Master in the Hakuin-Inzan line of the Rinzai tradition; University of Oxford)
Christopher Gill (University of Exeter)
Livia Kohn (Boston University)
Karyn Lai (University of New South Wales)
Graham Parkes (University of Vienna)
Graham Priest (City University of New York)
Katja Vogt (Columbia University)

Seven graduate/early career researchers selected through our CfA will also be giving papers:

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CFA – Curing through Questioning: Philosophy as Therapy Across Ancient Traditions and Modern Applications – Deadline: 1st March 2019

We invite proposals for papers to be given at an interdisciplinary conference on the theme ‘Curing through Questioning: Philosophy as Therapy Across Ancient Traditions and Modern Applications’, to take place at Worcester College, University of Oxford, on 1st – 2nd June 2019. The invited speakers are Jessica Frazier (University of Oxford), Livia Kohn (Boston University), Karyn Lai (University of New South Wales), Graham Parkes (University of Vienna), Graham Priest (City University of New York) and Katja Vogt (Columbia University).

Looking back to the ancient world, a common thread connecting a wide range of traditions across the globe is an inherent link between theoretical questioning and the development of therapeutic practices. We welcome abstracts which address either of the following themes:

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New Book: Cultivating a Good Life in Early Chinese and Ancient Greek Philosophy

Part I: Harmony, Balance, Beauty: Understanding Conceptions of Cultivation
1. Cultivation and Harmony: Plato and Confucius (Rick Benitez, University of Sydney, Australia)
2. Cultivating Noble Simplicity: Plato (L.M.J. Coulson, University of Sydney, Australia)
3. The Beauty Ladder and the Mind-heart Excursion: Plato and Zhuangzi (Wang Keping, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Beijing)
4. Awareness and Spontaneity: Three Perspectives in the Zhuangzi (Lisa Raphals, University of California, Riverside, USA)
5. Understanding “Dao’s Patterns”: Han Fei (Barbara Hendrischke, Sydney University, Australia)

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Chinese philosophy resources for teaching

Hi all, I compiled a list of Chinese philosophy resources for teaching for the APA Blog. Please feel free to add to it, though bear in mind that the list is not for full-semester Chinese philosophy courses but specifically for non-expert instructors who wish to introduce some glimpses into Chinese philosophy.  The discussions shouldn’t be too technical and must generally be accessible for undergraduate students.

PhD scholarship in Chinese-Western Comparative Philosophy: Comparative Epistemology. AUD$50,000 per year over 4 years plus fee waiver

PhD scholarship in Chinese-Western Comparative Philosophy
University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia

We invite applications from prospective PhD students to work on the research topic below. The scholarship will run over 4 years, and the following will be provided:

– Tuition fee waiver
– AUD$40,000 p.a. stipend (tax-free)
– Up to AUD$10,000 p.a. career development funds

PhD Research Project Title
Epistemology enlarged: knowledge as practice in Chinese and Western philosophy

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