Author Archives: Steve Angle

The North-East Conference on Chinese Thought is Back!

I’m delighted to announce that this year’s meeting of the North-East Conference on Chinese Thought will be held November 12-13 (Sat. & Sun.) at Yale University. The NECCT annual meeting is an opportunity for students of Chinese thought (broadly defined) from across the northeast (also broadly defined) to share and discuss their work. We are very excited to resume this annual tradition after the disruptions of the last few years.

  • WHERE: Luce Hall at Yale University, which is the home of the Council on East Asian Studies. We will have access to a large conference room and a lounge for meals and refreshments.
  • FORMAT: Fifteen 30-minute slots (eleven on Saturday plus five on Sunday morning.) We ask speakers to speak for 20 minutes and leave 10 minutes for Q&A.
  • ACCOMMODATIONS: For speakers only, hotel rooms in downtown New Haven for the nights of 11/11 and 11/12.
  • TRAVEL: NECCT doesn’t normally cover travel expenses. However, this year we have a fund of $1500 to cover travel costs for students.
  • HOW TO APPLY: By Friday, September 2, please send your talk title and abstract to Mick Hunter (mick.hunter@yale.edu). We expect to have the schedule finalized by 9/5. Students seeking help with travel costs should contact the same email address by the end of October.

If you have any questions about the conference, please contact Mick Hunter (mick.hunter@yale.edu). We look forward to hearing from you!

Allinson, The Philosophical Influences of Mao Zedong

Robert Elliott Allinson is pleased to announce that he has published a single authored monograph, The Philosophical Influences of Mao Zedong: Notations, Reflections and Insights with Bloomsbury Academic Publishers, London, Oxford, New York, New Delhi and Sydney, 2020. It has received endorsements from the following:

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“Non-Western” tenure-track jobs in philosophy

Back in April, Marcus Arvan put out this blog post analyzing which specializations were listed in the 2021-22 jobs posted at PhilJobs. He concludes that “Non-Western Philosophy” was the requested specialization in 5.8% of tenure-track jobs in this past year, which is pretty stable over the past several years. Note that if a job lists two specializations, then that counts as 0.5 of a job for each, and so on for even more potential specializations. He adds that another 6% of the tenure track jobs list Non-Western as a desired teaching competence (“area of competence”). We don’t have numbers ready-to-hand for the number of job seekers with one or another variety of “Non-Western” as an AOC, but I suspect that the ratio of seekers to jobs in this area compares favorably to most other areas of specialization. Which is not to say that getting a job in philosophy is ever easy!

2021 Dao Annual Best Essay Award

Dao has established “The Annual Best Essay Award” since 2007. The editorial board has just finished its deliberation on the best essay published in 2021, and the award is given to:

Benoit Vermander, “Edit by Number: Looking at the Composition of the Huainanzi, and Beyond.” Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 20 (2021): 459-498

Via a hermeneutics focused on numerology and concentric arrangements, the essay, which demonstrates familiarity with the germane historiography, literature, and theoretical apparatuses, offers an original construal of a textual universe in early China writings. Instead of taking for granted the organization and configuration, or the absence thereof, of these texts, it argues that there is a structural rhetoric. With particular reference to the Huainanzi, it lays bare the discernible and distinguishable patterns of textual composition while relating them to corresponding patterns of thinking. In so doing, it suggests the possibility and importance of looking beyond the writings’ intertextuality and toward their inter-structure.

The two runners-up are:

Yutang Jin, “Classic Confucian Thought and Political Meritocracy: A Text-based Critique.” Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 20 (2021): 433-458, and

Ian Sullivan, “The Need for More than Role Relations: Queer Lives, Social Group Identities, and Confucian Self-cultivation.” Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 20 (2021): 269-287

Springer has set the above three essays for free access.

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Rapporteur reports from RWCP on Sosa and Zagzebski

On April 22, the fifth Rutgers Workshop on Chinese Philosophy took place, with six scholars of Chinese philosophy presenting papers that engaged with the work of Ernest Sosa and Linda Zagzebski. The workshop’s website is here. At the workshop, two Rutgers graduate students, Esther Goh and Frederick Choo, served as rapporteurs, taking notes on each presentation and on the discussion. Their reports follow here, to give those who were not present a sense of the day’s richness. Thanks very much to Ester and Fredrick for these detailed reports!

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Two new essays by Bin Song

Bin Song has recently published two essays that readers may find interesting:

“Donald Trump, Mao Zedong and Religious Anti-Intellectualism,” in Donald Trump in Historical Perspective: Dead Precedents, Edited by Michael Harvey (Routledge, 2022)

and

“The Utopian Seed of Modern Chinese Politics in Ruism (Confucianism) and its Tillichian Remedy,” in Why Tillich? Why Now?, Edited by Thomas G. Bandy (Mercer University Press, 2021)

Rutgers Workshop in Chinese Philosophy: Virtue Epistemology

The 5th RWCP will be held in-person and on-line on Friday, April 22, 2022. In this one-day workshop, six scholars of Chinese philosophy will engage two leading virtue epistemologists, Ernest Sosa and Linda Zagzebski. The workshop program and other details are available here. This year’s workshop is co-sponsored by Rutgers Global-China Office, the Confucius Institute, Religion Department, and Philosophy Department. RSVP is required for attendance, either in-person (limited to the room capacity) or online. Q&A is limited to the in-person audience. Click here to RSVP.

 

Online Panel — Cosmopolitanism: An Invitation for Confucian-Catholic Dialogue

Cosmopolitanism: An Invitation for Confucian-Catholic Dialogue

An event of the China Forum for Civilizational Dialogue, a partnership between Georgetown University and La Civiltà Cattolica

Wednesday, April 13, 2022, 9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. EDT, online; REGISTER HERE.

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On-Line Lecture: Angle on Growing Moral

I will be giving an on-line talk next week on my new book, Growing Moral: A Confucian Guide to Life, hosted by the Center for East Asian and Comparative Philosophy at the City University of Hong Kong. The talk will take place via Zoom at 10 am on Friday, April 8 in HKT, which will be at 10pm on Thursday, April 7 EDT. So if you’re in East Asia, or are a night owl in the US, feel free to join! Details are on the attached poster.

Upcoming Neo-Confucianism Seminar on Kang Youwei

The next session of the Columbia University Seminar on Neo-Confucian Studies will convene on Friday April 1st from 10-11:30 am EDT, over Zoom.

The speaker will be Federico Brusadelli of the Università di Napoli L’Orientale, now also a Visiting Fellow at the Polish Institute of Advanced Study. Professor Brusadelli will present his draft “Race, Reproduction, Resources: Kang Youwei’s Datongshu as a 20th-century Global Prophecy.”

If you’d like to receive the paper and join the meeting, please contact Nolan Bensen, Rapporteur for the Seminar on Neo-Confucian Studies.