Author Archives: Steve Angle

New Book: Bell and Wang, Just Hierarchy

Daniel A. Bell (贝淡宁) and Wang Pei (汪沛)’s new book Just Hierarchy: Why Social Hierarchies Matter in China and the Rest of the World will be officially published by Princeton University Press in March but advance copies have arrived in the warehouse and the book can be ordered on the PUP website. Please enter discount code C285 for 30% off. The discount expires June 30, 2020. For more information from the press, read on.

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Ivanhoe at Columbia Neo-Confucianism Seminar

The first Spring session of the Columbia Seminar on Neo-Confucian Studies (University Seminar #567) will convene on February 7th, from 3:30 to 5:30pm in the main board room of the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University.
The speaker will be Philip J. Ivanhoe, who will be sharing his “Dasan on ‘Sympathetic Consideration’ (恕, Seo)“. This presentation will fill out and in some cases correct his earlier views on Dasan’s conception of 恕.

Journal Issue Dedicated to Li Zehou

Asian Studies has just published a new issue entitled “Ethics and the Beauty of Human Becoming: Special Issue dedicated to Li Zehou on his 90th Birthday.” You can download the whole issue or essays from it at https://revije.ff.uni-lj.si/as/issue/current. The Table of Contents follows.

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Stanchina on Wang Yangming and Sloterdijk

Back in 2015, Gabriella Stanchina published a fascinating comparative article titled “Zhi 知as unceasing dynamism and practical effort. The common root of knowledge and action in Wang Yangming and Peter Sloterdijk” in Wenxue: Journal of the ECNU Simian Institute for advanced studies in Humanities. Because the journal is not readily available, she has received permission to share it here. Enjoy!

CFP: 16th Annual Midwest Conference on Chinese Thought

16th Annual Midwest Conference on Chinese Thought
University of Louisville (Louisville, KY)
April 25-26, 2020

The Midwest Conference on Chinese Thought (MCCT) is an annual conference dedicated to exploring past and present aspects of Chinese thought. It is an interdisciplinary gathering of scholars and students coming from disciplines or fields such as philosophy, religious studies, history, philology, and other disciplines or fields in the humanities and social sciences. While the conference is hosted each year by an institution in the Midwest United States, we welcome the participation of scholars and students from around the world.

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CFP: Association for Political Theory

The organizers tell me “We welcome papers in Chinese and comparative political philosophy and hope that we will receive many submissions from philosophers and theorists who work in these fields.”

2020 Association for Political Theory Call for Papers

Proposal Deadline: Monday, February 10, 2020

The Association for Political Theory Annual Conference (University of Massachusetts Amherst, November 12th-14th, 2020)

Program Committee Co-Chairs: Jennie Ikuta (University of Tulsa) andK ennan Ferguson (University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee)

The Association for Political Theory (APT) invites paper proposals for its annual conference to be held November 12th-14th, 2020, at the campus of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. We will consider papers on all topics in political theory, political philosophy and their cognate disciplines, from scholars working in any field at any institution. Any scholars who are ABD or who hold a terminal degree in their fields may apply; we also encourage faculty members to volunteer to serve as chairs and/or discussants.

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New Book: State-Society Relations and Confucian Revivalism in Contemporary China

Qin PANG has published State-Society Relations and Confucian Revivalism in Contemporary China (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019); see here for details. The abstract:

This book is a study of the causes of the Confucian revival and the party-state’s response in China today. It concentrates on the interactions between state and society, and the implications for the Chinese state’s control over society, or in other words, its survival over a rapidly modernizing society. The book explores the answers to questions such as: Why has Confucianism suddenly gathered great momentum in contemporary Chinese society? What is the role of the Chinese state in its rise? Is the state really the orchestrator of the Confucian revival as has been widely assumed? This book will be of interest to think-tank and policy researchers, sinologists, and those with an interest in Chinese society.