Warp, Weft, and Way

Chinese and Comparative Philosophy 中國哲學與比較哲學

Two Books on Korean Confucianism

Over the past year, Edward Chung has published two significant books on Korean Confucianism, one a translation and one an overview. Please read on for details.

Edward Y. J. Chung, A Korean Confucian Way of Life and Thought: The Chasongnok (Record of Self-reflection) by Yi Hwang (T’oegye). Korean Classics Library: Philosophy and Religion (series editor: Robert Buswell, UCLA). Honolulu: The University of Hawai’i Press. Cloth edition, 2015 (November). ISBN: 978-0-8248-5584-0

Edward Y. J. Chung, Korean Confucianism: Tradition and Modernity. UKS (Understanding Korea Series), no. 3.  Seongnam: The Academy of Korean Studies (AKS) Press, 2015 (April). ISBN: 979-11-86178-14-0-03150.

  • Eleven chapters, annotated notes, various comments, cross-references, a bibliography, etc.].
  • The AKS web: The Academy of Korean Studies (http://intl.aks.ac.kr/english)
  • Visit the Center for International Affairs:  View Menu – Materials Request by CLICKING http://intl.ikorea.ac.kr/english/viewforum.php?f=116&sid=ae42e3870a4f5276dc25d9e0d283844c; SELECT ITEM: 5th book, Korean Confucianism….
  • DESCRIPTION: Confucianism was declared dead not long ago: many Western intellectuals anticipated its collapse in East Asia. In this century, however, it remains healthy and engaging in South Korean society and its overseas communities. This new book discusses various aspects of Korean Confucianism in terms of “tradition” and “modernity” pertaining to philosophy, education, family, social ethics, political leadership, national identity, ritual practice, and spiritual culture. It consists of eleven interconnected chapters. Although the book is written in a scholarly format, it is intended for a broader audience including college professors and students, school teachers and librarians, education agencies and officials, and general readers. It will certainly contribute to our better global understanding of Confucianism in Korea and elsewhere.
  • NOTE: This book is not for sale. You can ask for a complimentary copy if your teaching and research areas need it.

November 21st, 2015 Posted by | Books of Interest, Comparative philosophy, Confucianism, Contemporary Confucianism, Korea, Korean Philosophy, Neo-Confucianism, Translation | no comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *