Warp, Weft, and Way

Chinese and Comparative Philosophy 中國哲學與比較哲學

Analects 2.13

A while back, in the now-vanished Discussions section, I proposed a new idea about Analects 2.13.  Here I’m putting it back on the record.

2.13

子貢問君子。子曰:「先行其言,而後從之。」(ctext.org)

On Tzŭ Kung asking about the nobler type of man the Master said: “He first practices what he preaches and afterwards preaches according to his practice.” (Soothill)

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December 15, 2018 Posted by | Analects, Confucius, Self-Cultivation, Translation | 3 comments

Slingerland Reviews Hunter, Confucius Beyond the Analects

The latest issue of Early China contains a review by Edward Slingerland of Michael Hunter, Confucius Beyond the Analects (Leiden: Brill, 2017). Slingerland’s concluding paragraph:

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December 13, 2018 Posted by | Analects, Books of Interest, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Chinese Texts, Confucius | no comments

Analects 5.22

Recently I noticed that the way I have always read Analects 5.22 is out of line with the wide consensus.  So maybe I’m just missing something.

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December 12, 2018 Posted by | Analects, Confucius | 4 comments

Columbia Neo-Confucianism Seminar: Sommer on Analects

The next session of the Columbia University Seminar on Neo-Confucian Studies will convene this Friday, December 7th, from 3:30 to 5:30pm in the main board room of the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University.

The speaker will be Deborah Sommer, who will be sharing her “Reflections on a Topically Arranged Translation of the Analects,” as well as a draft of the first chapter. Please contact the Rapporteur, Zach Berge-Becker, for more information and for copies of the paper.

December 4, 2018 Posted by | Analects, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Translation | no comments

NYT on C. C. Tsai’s Comics / Bruya’s Translations available from PUP

The New York Times recently published an interview with C. C. Tsai, who has written and illustrated wonderful cartoon versions of the Art of War and the Analects (among others). Brian Bruya’s translated versions of both of these texts are now available from Princeton University Press.

July 15, 2018 Posted by | Analects, Books of Interest, China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学 | one comment

Paperback of Ni, Understanding the Analects

SUNY Press recently published the paperback version of Peimin Ni’s Understanding the Analects of Confucius: A New Translation of the Lunyu with Annotations.

October 9, 2017 Posted by | Analects, Books of Interest, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Confucius, Translation | 10 comments

Update on Qi Analects

The archaeologists who are cleaning up the bamboo strips found in the Haihunhou tomb are expected to confirm that one of the texts recovered is the long lost Qi version of the Analects; see here.

September 3, 2017 Posted by | Analects, China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Excavated Texts | no comments

Chinese news report on unearthed Qi Analects

This report discusses an unearthed text thought to be the lost Qi Analects (《齐论语》).

July 5, 2017 Posted by | Analects, China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Chinese Texts, Excavated Texts | no comments

Two Concepts of Roles

There are many images and metaphors that might serve as cores of conceptions of something for which one could use the English word “role.”  One way to look for some is to look at words from other languages.  I’ll look here at two, one from Greek and one from old Chinese.

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June 15, 2017 Posted by | Analects, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Ethical Theory, Roger Ames, Role Ethics | 5 comments

New Book: Ni translation of the Analects

Peimin Ni’s new translation-and-commentary on the Analects, Understanding the Analects of Confucius: A New Translation of Lunyu with Annotations, is due out soon:  (SUNY, 2017). I have read the book in manuscript, and wrote the following blurb:

Peimin Ni’s translation of the Analects has many virtues that make it stand out as an exemplary version of this most important Chinese text. Ni has chosen to present the text as a living document, embedded in two thousand years of commentarial conversation over its meaning, with today’s readers very much part of that ongoing conversation.

Among other things, Peimin skillfully translates the text so that its potential ambiguity comes through, making sense of commentarial debates in ways that previous translations have not captured. Congratulations!

February 23, 2017 Posted by | Analects, Books of Interest, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Confucianism | no comments

New Book: Hunter, Confucius Beyond the Analects

Michael (“Mick”) Hunter’s new book, Confucius Beyond the Analects (Brill 2017) has now been published. Congratulations, Mick! More information is here and below.

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February 18, 2017 Posted by | Analects, Books of Interest, China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Confucius | no comments

R. Kim Reviews H. Kim’s Translation of Dasan on the Analects

Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews

2017.01.16 View this Review Online   View Other NDPR Reviews

Jeong Yak-yong (Dasan), The Analects of Dasan, Volume 1: A Korean Syncretic Reading, Hongkyung Kim (tr. and comm.), Oxford University Press, 2016, 260pp., $85.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780190624996.

Reviewed by Richard Kim, Saint Louis University

Even among contemporary Western philosophers with an interest in East Asian philosophy, there are relatively few who are familiar with the works of Jeong Yak-yong (Dasan, 1762-1836), arguably the most brilliant mind in Korean intellectual history. The neglect of Dasan is in part due to the lack of English translations of his works. Hongkyung Kim’s translation and commentary is an important step toward introducing the writings of one of the most outstanding thinkers in Korean history.

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January 20, 2017 Posted by | Analects, Book Review, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Confucianism, Korean Philosophy | 2 comments

Alexus McLeod – Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy Lecture: “The Madman of Chu: The Problem of Mental Illness and Self-Cultivation in Early Chinese Texts”, Dec. 2 @ 5:30pm

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes: ALEXUS MCLEOD (University of Connecticut)
With responses from: ANDREW MEYER (Brooklyn College, CUNY)

Please join us at Columbia University’s Religion Department on FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2nd at 5:30PM for his lecture entitled:

The Madman of Chu: The Problem of Mental Illness and Self-Cultivation in Early Chinese Texts

ABSTRACT: In Confucian and Zhuangist texts of the Pre-Han and Han period, we see characters described as “crazy, mad” (狂 kuang), and find descriptions or discussions of madness or mad persons—most prominently the infamous Jieyu, “Madman of Chu”. I argue that madness is seen by Confucians and Zhuangists as a kind of moral deformity that moves one outside of the boundaries of ritual and society and thus full personhood—a fact that leads the Confucians to shun mad people, and the Zhuangist to praise them.  Madness is seen not as a 病 bing (disorder, illness), but instead as based on a cultivated choice.   Continue reading “Alexus McLeod – Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy Lecture: “The Madman of Chu: The Problem of Mental Illness and Self-Cultivation in Early Chinese Texts”, Dec. 2 @ 5:30pm”

November 17, 2016 Posted by | Analects, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Huainanzi, Lecture, Self-Cultivation, Zhuangzi | no comments

The Roots of a Reading

Here and there I have argued that Confucius did not think family virtue is the root of ren 仁; far from it. In defense of that claim I’ll now try to answer the question: how then do so many scholars think he did?

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August 5, 2016 Posted by | Analects, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Confucius, Filial piety, Roger Ames | 6 comments

Analects 1.6, and how Confucius envisioned moral progress

Confucius’ remark at Analects 1.6 is often cited to show that he thought proper moral development begins with filial piety and then extends that attitude to ever-larger groups of people (ever less intensely).  I shall argue that the remark does not display such a view.  Confucius did not in general envision moral progress as extension.

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July 29, 2016 Posted by | Analects, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Confucianism, Confucius, Education Models, Filial piety, Moral Psychology, Ritual, Roger Ames, Self-Cultivation, Virtue | 4 comments

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