Warp, Weft, and Way

Chinese and Comparative Philosophy 中國哲學與比較哲學

WWWOPY Follow-Up: Please share your ideas

Some of you may remember that Hagop Sarkissian and I announced a while back a plan to acknowledge top papers on Chinese philosophy (journal articles and anthology chapters) via something we called the WWWOPY (Warp, Weft, and Way Outstanding Papers of the Year). Following the announced procedure, we wrote to a wide range of research-active colleagues (both junior and senior, and of various methodological and theoretical backgrounds) to solicit nominations. However, we received zero replies with nominations. So we are re-thinking our idea.

We subsequently wrote again to the same set of twenty-four colleagues, telling them what happened and asking (1) whether they thought this was a good idea, and (2) whether they had suggestions to make it work better. This time almost everyone replied, but there was little consensus. In reflecting on all the feedback, we did conclude that especially in a growing field with an increasing number of new voices, finding a way to call attention to particularly valuable, recent, article-length work still seems like a good idea. Many people told us that they did not keep regular tabs on this kind of new work, only digging in when they began a new project. But this means that too many people may be missing ideas that should prompt new or different kinds of research projects in the first place, among other consequences.

However we are a bit stymied about how to proceed, and so decided to open this topic up for general discussion. It is hard to find an approach that seems likely to be both useful and practical. Please share your thoughts!

June 10, 2017 Posted by | Articles of Interest, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Journal Related, Profession | 2 comments

Olberding on the Confucian role for etiquette in resisting injustice

Amy Olberding’s “The Moral Gravity of Mere Trifles” at LSE’s The Forum. She begins:

“Some of the most heated critiques of etiquette emphasize a tension between progressive political values and conformity to polite norms. Insistence on polite rules of interaction may, so the worry goes, stifle righteous dissent, suppress critique of the powerful, and mire us all in hidebound tradition. Better to forcefully call out injustice when we see it than abide by polite rules that sacrifice moral progress to surface social accord. In these critiques, etiquette can seem an enemy of salutary change and a barrier to justice. This reasoning, the early Confucians would argue, misses much about how etiquette works and what it contributes to moral life….”

May 29, 2017 Posted by | Articles of Interest, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Confucianism, Ritual | no comments

2016 Dao Annual Best Essay Award Winner

 

Dao has established The Annual Best Essay Award since 2007. In addition to a certificate of achievement, the award comes along with a prize of US$1,000. The award winners are noted in the website of this journal as well as the website of Springer, the publisher of this journal. The award ceremony is held each year at the American Philosophical Association Annual Meeting (Eastern Division), where a special panel on the theme of the award winning essay is held.

The selection process consists of two stages. At the beginning of each year, a nominating committee of at least three editorial members, who have not published in Dao in the given year, is established. This committee is charged with the task of nominating three best essays published in the previous year. These three essays are then sent to the whole editorial board for deliberation. The final winner is decided by a vote by all editorial board members who are not authors of the nominated essays.

The editorial board has just finished its deliberation on the best essay published in 2016, and the award is given to:

Continue reading “2016 Dao Annual Best Essay Award Winner”

April 30, 2017 Posted by | Articles of Interest, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Journal News | no comments

New Draft Essay on Human Rights and Chinese Tradition

I have recently completed a draft chapter, titled “Human Rights and Chinese Tradition,” for the Handbook on human rights in China being edited by Sarah Biddulph and Joshua Rosenzweig. Anyone interested can take a look; I have uploaded it to my personal archive here. Comments are very welcome!

February 10, 2017 Posted by | Articles of Interest, China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative Political Theory, Confucianism, Contemporary Confucianism, Human Rights | 3 comments

Israel on Wang Yangming

Larry Israel wrote to share information on two articles he’s recently published on Wang Yangming. We are always happy to pass on this kind of news! 

https://muse.jhu.edu/article/626973  “The Renaissance of Wang Yangming Studies in the People’s Republic of China,” Philosophy East and West, vol. 66, no. 3 (July 2016): 1001-1019.  Takes the story up to 2014.

link to cambridge.org A new journal launched by Cambridge, the Journal of Chinese History Israel, G.L. (2016) ‘WANG YANGMING IN BEIJING, 1510–1512: “IF I DO NOT AWAKEN OTHERS, WHO WILL DO SO?”’ Journal of Chinese History, pp. 1–33. 

November 29, 2016 Posted by | Articles of Interest, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Neo-Confucianism, Wang Yangming | 2 comments