Category Archives: Books of Interest

New Analects Translation

Paul van Els of Leiden University writes…

This new translation of the Lunyu, which recently came out, may have escaped the attention of Warp, Weft, and Way blog readers, as it was published by what appears to be an obscure press:

Li, Chris Wen-Chao. 2018. What Confucius Really Said: The Complete Analects in a Skopos-Centric Translation. San Francisco: Maison 174. (https://www.amazon.com/dp/1727464494/)

Purists might frown upon this translation, if only because the real Confucius could not and would not have quoted Katy Perry as saying “You’re hot then you’re cold, You’re yes then you’re no, You’re in then you’re out, You’re up then you’re down” (p. 164). Still, Li’s work is a creative take on the ancient text, and translations such as “Confucius @MasterSays: Guys who talk sweet and smile all the time are scum.” (p. 3) might strike a chord with the Twitter generation.

New Book: Harrington’s translation of Cheng Yi, The Yi River Commentary on the Book of Changes

Yale University press is about to release Michael Harrington’s excellent translation of Cheng Yi’s very important The Yi River Commentary on the Book of Changes, with an introduction by Michael and Robin Wang. More details are here.

New Book Series: Oxford Chinese Thought

Eric L. Hutton and I are very pleased to announce the launch of a new book series devoted exclusively to translations of Chinese philosophical and religious texts, Oxford Chinese Thought. The series will be published by Oxford University Press and, at least initially, all books will be released immediately into paperback. As most readers of this blog know, there is a vast body of philosophical and religious literature in Chinese and only the thinnest slice of it — barely a sliver — has been translated into English, which has created major obstacles to teaching and scholarship on Chinese thought, especially to teaching the post-classical thinkers in depth. Oxford Chinese Thought aims to address this longstanding challenge by providing high-quality English translations that are well suited for classroom use.

Translations are solicited by the series editors in consultation with the advisory board. We intend to focus primarily on post-Han texts that played significant roles in shaping Chinese thought. Continue reading →

New book: Heaven is Empty: A Cross-Cultural Approach to “Religion” and Empire in Ancient China by Filippo Marsili

SUMMARY

Heaven is Empty offers a new perspective on the relationship between religion and the creation of the first Chinese empires. Heaven Is Empty offers a new comparative perspective on the role of the sacred in the formation of China’s early empires (221 BCE–9 CE) and shows how the unification of the Central States was possible without a unitary and universalistic conception of religion.

Continue reading →

Two New Books by Bo Mou

(1) Bo Mou (Jan 2019), Semantic-Truth Approaches in Chinese Philosophy: A Unifying Pluralist Account (Lexington Books).

This monograph book explains a distinctive pluralist account of truth (jointly-rooted perspectivism) in the context of cross-tradition philosophical engagement for two closely related purposes:

  1. to enhance our understanding and treatment of the truth concern as one strategic foundation of various representative movements of thought (the Yi-Jing philosophy, Gongsun Long’s philosophy, Later Mohist philosophy, classical Confucianism, and classical Daoism) in classical Chinese philosophy that are intended to capture “how things are”, and
  2. to explore how the relevant resources in Chinese philosophy can contribute to the contemporary exploration of the philosophical issue of truth in philosophically interesting and engaging ways.

More information here.

(2) Bo Mou (ed.) (2018), Philosophy of Language, Chinese Language, Chinese Philosophy: Constructive Engagement (Brill).

From the constructive-engagement vantage point of doing philosophy of language comparatively, this anthology volume explores:

  1. how reflective elaboration of some distinct features of the Chinese language and of philosophically interesting resources concerning language in Chinese philosophy can contribute to our treatment of a range of issues in philosophy of language and
  2. how relevant resources in contemporary philosophy of language can contribute to philosophical interpretations of reflectively interesting resources concerning the Chinese language and Chinese texts. The foregoing contributing fronts constitute two complementary sides of this project.

More information here.

January 2019 New Books

Several exciting new books have just been or are about to be published!

Jana Rošker, Following His Own Path: Li Zehou and Contemporary Chinese Philosophy (SUNY, 2019): here.

Michiko Yusa, ed., The Bloomsbury Research Handbook of Contemporary Japanese Philosophy (Bloomsbury, 2019): here.

Alexus McLeod, ed., The Bloomsbury Research Handbook of Early Chinese Ethics and Political Philosophy (Bloomsbury, 2019): here.

Hans-Georg Moeller and Andrew Whitehead, eds., Imagination: Cross-Cultural Philosophical Analyses (Bloomsbury, 2019): here.

Karyn Lai, Rick Benitez, and Hyun Jin Kim, eds., Cultivating a Good Life in Early Chinese and Ancient Greek Philosophy: Perspectives and Reverberations (Bloomsbury, 2019): here.

William J. Long, Tantric State: A Buddhist Approach to Democracy and Development in Bhutan (Oxford, 2018): here.

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