Category Archives: Books of Interest

Book of Interest: Dao Companion to the Excavated Guodian Bamboo Manuscripts ed. by Shirley Chan

For more details, please see the publisher page.

About This Book:

This volume covers the philosophical, historical, religious, and interpretative aspects of the ancient Guodian bamboo manuscripts (郭店楚簡) which were disentombed in the Guodian Village in Hubei Province, China, in 1993. Considered to be the Chinese equivalent of the Dead Sea Scrolls, these manuscripts are archaeological finds whose importance cannot be underestimated. Many of the texts are without counterparts in the transmitted tradition, and they provide unique insights into the developments of Chinese philosophy in the period between the death of Confucius (551-479 BCE) and the writings of Mencius (c.372-289 BCE), and beyond.

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Symposium on and Review of Ing, The Vulnerability of Integrity

Here is a link to the online-first publication of a symposium on Michael Ing’s The Vulnerability of Integrity in Early Confucian Thought (the print issue is due out in July in Res Philosophica): 

https://www.pdcnet.org/resphilosophica/onlinefirst

Here is a link to Julianne Chung’s review of the book in Mind:

https://academic.oup.com/mind/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/mind/fzz010/5456845

Thanks for sharing these with me, Julianne!

New Analects Translation

Paul van Els of Leiden University writes…

This new translation of the Lunyu, which recently came out, may have escaped the attention of Warp, Weft, and Way blog readers, as it was published by what appears to be an obscure press:

Li, Chris Wen-Chao. 2018. What Confucius Really Said: The Complete Analects in a Skopos-Centric Translation. San Francisco: Maison 174. (https://www.amazon.com/dp/1727464494/)

Purists might frown upon this translation, if only because the real Confucius could not and would not have quoted Katy Perry as saying “You’re hot then you’re cold, You’re yes then you’re no, You’re in then you’re out, You’re up then you’re down” (p. 164). Still, Li’s work is a creative take on the ancient text, and translations such as “Confucius @MasterSays: Guys who talk sweet and smile all the time are scum.” (p. 3) might strike a chord with the Twitter generation.

New Book: Harrington’s translation of Cheng Yi, The Yi River Commentary on the Book of Changes

Yale University press is about to release Michael Harrington’s excellent translation of Cheng Yi’s very important The Yi River Commentary on the Book of Changes, with an introduction by Michael and Robin Wang. More details are here.