Category Archives: Books of Interest

New Book: Archery Metaphor and Ritual in Early Confucian Texts

Rina Marie Camus’ new book, Archery Metaphor and Ritual in Early Confucian Texts, has been published by Rowman & Littlefield. A brief description about the book:

Archery Metaphor and Ritual in Early Confucian Texts explores the significance of archery as ritual practice and image source in classical Confucian texts. Archery was one of the six traditional arts of China, the foremost military skill, a tool for education, and above all, an important custom of the rulers and aristocrats of the early dynasties. Rina Marie Camus analyzes passages inspired by archery in the texts of the Analects, Mencius, and Xunzi in relation to the shifting social and historical conditions of the late Zhou dynasty, the troubled times of early followers of the ruist master Confucius. Camus posits that archery imagery is recurrent and touches on fundamental themes of literature; ritual archers in the Analects, sharp shooters in Mencius, and the fashioning of exquisite bows and arrows in Xunzi represent the gentleman, pursuit of ren, and self-cultivation. Furthermore, Camus argues that not only is archery an important Confucian metaphor, it also proves the cognitive value of literary metaphors—more than linguistic ornamentation, metaphoric utterances have features and resonances that disclose their speakers’ saliencies of thought.

For more information about the book, please click here!

New Book: Transcendence and Non-Naturalism in Early Chinese Thought

Alexus McLeod and Joshua R. Brown’s new book, Transcendence and Non-Naturalism in Early Chinese Thought, has been published by Bloomsbury!  A brief description:

Contemporary scholars of Chinese philosophy often presuppose that early China possessed a naturalistic worldview, devoid of any non-natural concepts, such as transcendence. Challenging this presupposition head-on, Joshua R. Brown and Alexus McLeod argue that non-naturalism and transcendence have a robust and significant place in early Chinese thought.

Click here for more information about the book.

New Book: Canda, The Way of Humanity: Confucian Wisdom for an Opening World (Teachings of the Korean Philosopher, Haengchon)

Edward R. Canda’s new book, The Way of Humanity: Confucian Wisdom for an Opening World (Teachings of the Korean Philosopher, Haengchon), has been published by University of Kansas Libraries!  See here for more information.

New Book: Bo, Cross-Tradition Engagement in Philosophy

Bo Mou’s new book, Cross-Tradition Engagement in Philosophy: A Constructive Engagement Account has been published by Routledge! A brief description:

This book presents a systematic unifying-pluralist account—a constructive-engagement account—of how cross-tradition engagement in philosophy is possible. The goal of this constructive-engagement account is, by way of reflective criticism, argumentation, and methodological guiding principles, to inquire into how distinct approaches from different philosophical traditions can talk to and learn from each other for the sake of making joint contributions to the contemporary development of philosophy.

Click here for more information about the book.

New Book: History of Chinese Philosophy Through Its Key Terms

An English translation of History of Chinese Philosophy Through Its Key Terms has been published by Nanjing University Press and Springer! Click here for more information about the book.  Below is a brief description of the book from the words of the book’s translator, Shuchen Xiang:

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New Book: Fung, Dao Companion to Chinese Philosophy of Logic

Huang Yong writes to share this news:

Dao Companion to Chinese Philosophy of Logic (volume 12 in the series of Dao Companions to Chinese Philosophy), edited by Yiuming Fung, has just been published by Springer.  Below is an overview of the book.  Here is a link to the Dao Companions series.

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