Category Archives: Books of Interest

David Wong’s new ‘Moral Relativism and Pluralism’ available for free download until Jan 20

Readers of this blog might be interested in David Wong’s new Moral Relativism and Pluralism by Cambridge University Press. It is available to download for free directly from CUP until January 20. If you’re interested, don’t delay!

It’s part of the Cambridge Elements series (specifically, Elements in Ethics), so it’s meant to be a succinct yet authoritative guide to the topic. Here is a summary of the book:

The argument for metaethical relativism, the view that there is no single true or most justified morality, is that it is part of the best explanation of the most difficult moral disagreements. The argument for this view features a comparison between traditions that highly value relationship and community and traditions that highly value personal autonomy of the individual and rights. It is held that moralities are best understood as emerging from human culture in response to the need to promote and regulate interpersonal cooperation and internal motivational coherence in the individual. The argument ends in the conclusion that there is a bounded plurality of true and most justified moralities that accomplish these functions. The normative implications of this form of metaethical relativism are explored, with specific focus on female genital cutting and abortion.

 

New Book: Acharya, et al, eds., Bridging Two Worlds

The University of California Press with support from the Berggruen Institute has published Amitav Acharya, Daniel A. Bell, Rajeev Bhargava, and Yan Xuetong, eds., Bridging Two Worlds: Comparing Classical Political Thought and Statecraft in India and China. The full text is available for download here; the Table of Contents is below.

Continue reading →

Confucianism at 2022 American Academy of Religion meetings

The American Academy of Religion is happy to announce that they will be having a 2022 meeting in Denver. The conference will have three sessions sponsored by the Confucian Traditions Unit. The meetings will be taking place November 19-22 in Denver Colorado. The three main themes are as follows: “Confucianism Enchanted: Narratives and Liturgies of Confucian Deities,” “Author Meets Critics: Mercedes Valmisa’s Adapting: A Chinese Philosophy of Action,” and roundtable on Tao Jiang’s book Origins of Moral-Political Philosophy in Early China. See here to for more information on the conference itself, and read on for details on the three panels.

Continue reading →

New Book: Ziran: The Philosophy of Spontaneous Self-Causation


I’d like to announce the publication of my new book Ziran: The Philosophy of Spontaneous Self-Causation. Targeted specifically at students, this book takes a key concept form early Chinese metaphysics—ziran 自然—and applies it to several fields of contemporary scholarship.

Continue reading →

New Book: Dao Companion to the Philosophy of the Zhuangzi

Springer has published the Dao Companion to the Philosophy of the Zhuangzi, edited by Kim-chong Chong. “It covers textual, linguistic, hermeneutical, ethical, social/political and philosophical issues, with the latter including epistemological, metaphysical, phenomenological and cross-cultural (Chinese and Western) aspects.”

A reviewer on Amazon warned “Only 34 of the 46 chapters are in the Kindle version.” Those interested might want to look into/verify this.

New Book: Korean Women Philosophers

The Oxford University Press has recently published a translation and study Korean Women Philosophers and the Ideal of a Female Sage: Essential Writings of Im Yungjidang and Gang Jeongildang, edited by Philip J. Ivanhoe and Hwa Yeong Wang. This work introduces the lives and ideas of two female Korean Confucian philosophers from the Joseon Dynasty. This edited edition provides translation and analysis of the writings of these philosophers. The editors also add in compared and contrast the philosophers’ thoughts with that of western thinkers.

New Book: Emotions in Korean Philosophy and Religion

Palgrave Macmillan has recently published a new book titled Emotions in Korean Philosophy and Religion edited by Edward Y. J. Chung and Jea Sophia Oh. The book is open to be freely download all together or in chapters as well! The book present thirteen articles on the fascinating topic of emotion in Korean Philosophy and religion. It not only gives background to emotions from both West and East disciplines but also offers insights into the diversity of Korean emotions. It discusses key Korean Confucian thinkers, debates and ideas to show the dynamics of these emotions.

New Book: Kim, Im Yunjidang

Cambridge University Press has recently published a new book titled Im Yunjidang by Sungmoon Kim. This short book in the Cambridge Elements series, looks at Im Yunjidang, an 18th-century Korean female Neo-Confucian philosopher, and is freely available to access online for the next two weeks. The book attempts to bring a new perspective on the relation between Confucianism and feminism. It critically examines the philosophical thought of Im Yunjidang and presents her as a feminist thinker in the time period. It shows how Im Yunjidang was able to reformulate Neo-Confucian metaphysics and ethics of moral self-cultivation.