Warp, Weft, and Way

Chinese and Comparative Philosophy 中國哲學與比較哲學

January 11, 2021
by Steve Angle
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New Book: Ames, Human Becomings: Theorizing Persons for Confucian Role Ethics

Roger Ames’s new book, Human Becomings: Theorizing Persons for Confucian Role Ethics (SUNY, 2020) has been published. The editor’s summary: In Human Becomings, Roger T. Ames argues that the appropriateness of categorizing Confucian ethics as role ethics turns largely on … Continue reading

January 11, 2021
by Steve Angle
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New Book: Elstein, ed., Dao Companion to Contemporary Confucian Philosophy

The latest volume in the authoritative Dao Companion series has been published: David Elstein, ed., Dao Companion to Contemporary Confucian Philosophy (Springer, 2021). The editorial description: This edited volume presents a comprehensive examination of contemporary Confucian philosophy from its roots … Continue reading

October 27, 2020
by Steve Angle
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Confucianism as Virtue Ethics in the Sinophone World

Almost 15 years ago when I spent a year in Beijing, much of it spent writing Sagehood, there was relatively little engagement with the idea that Confucian ethics might be helpfully understood through the lens of “virtue ethics.” Quite a lot … Continue reading

October 2, 2020
by Ernesto Ye Luo
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New Book: Cross-Cultural Existentialism: On the Meaning of Life in Asian and Western Thought

Leah Kalmanson’s new book, Cross-Cultural Existentialism: On the Meaning of Life in Asian and Western Thought, has been published by Bloomsbury!  A brief description of the book: Engaging in existential discourse beyond the European tradition, this book turns to Asian … Continue reading

October 2, 2020
by Ernesto Ye Luo
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New Book: Transcendence and Non-Naturalism in Early Chinese Thought

Alexus McLeod and Joshua R. Brown’s new book, Transcendence and Non-Naturalism in Early Chinese Thought, has been published by Bloomsbury! A brief description: Contemporary scholars of Chinese philosophy often presuppose that early China possessed a naturalistic worldview, devoid of any … Continue reading

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