Category Archives: Buddhism

Lecture: Li, The relationship between Neo-Confucianism and Buddhism

The Glorisun Global Network for Buddhist Studies is pleased to present:

The relationship between Neo-Confucianism and Buddhism in Song Dynasty taking Zhu Xi as an example

By Professor Li Chunying 李春穎, International Confucian Academy at China University of Political Science and Law

Date: Monday, December 6, 2021, 10:00 AM PST
Webpage: https://glorisunglobalnetwork.org/guest-lecture-li-chunying/
Registration: https://ubc.zoom.us/meeting/register/u5wrdOmoqzgvGN1Ua0TqENfP-XZayG8-nG12

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New Book: The Daodejing Commentary of Cheng Xuanying

Oxford University Press has published The Daodejing Commentary of Cheng Xuanying, a translation of Cheng Xuanying’s 成玄英 famous and philosophically rich commentary, which in turn shaped both Daoist and Buddhist discourse thereafter. The translation is expertly elucidated with ample notes and glosses by the translator, Friederike Assandri, a leading authority on Cheng Xuanying and the Twofold Mystery School.
This is now the third translation in the Oxford Chinese Thought book series, which is devoted to providing high-quality translations of important philosophical and religious texts, for scholars and for classroom use. A short description follows below the fold.

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ToC: APA Newsletter on Asian and Asian American Philosophers and Philosophies

Special Issue on Buddhist Philosophy: Book Symposium on Why I Am Not a Buddhist by Evan Thompson
From the Editors
“Editors’ Introduction: Buddhist Modernism and Its Discontents,” A. Minh Nguyen and Yarran Hominh
Articles
“Précis of Why I Am Not a Buddhist,” Evan Thompson
“On Pursuing the Dialogue Between Buddhism and Science in Ways That Distort Neither,” Christian Coseru
“On Being a Good Friend to Buddhist Philosophy,” Bronwyn Finnegan
“Buddhism after Buddhist Modernism: Comments on Evan Thompson’s Why I Am Not a Buddhist,” Jonardon Ganeri
“Throwing Out the Buddha with the Offering Water: Comments on Evan Thompson’s Why I Am Not a Buddhist,” Jay L. Garfield
“Free to Be You and Me: Cosmopolitanism, Pluralism, and Buddhist Modernism,” Laura P. Guerrero
“Some Questions for Friends of Buddhism,” Sonam Kachru
“Thompson Is Not a Buddhist, But What about the Rest of Us?,” Constance Kassor
“Deconstructing Buddhist Modernism Without Postmodern Orientalism?,” Abraham Velez de Cea
“Buddhist Modernism: Let’s Be Suspicious But Not Because It Lacks Faith,” Louise Williams
“Replies to Critics,” Evan Thompson

Click here for the full text of these essays and more information

A talk on Yogācāra Buddhist Philosophy at Rutgers tonight (April 21, 7-8:30pm EDT)

It’s a bit last minute, but readers of this blog might be interested in the following talk tonight:

Can Ultimate Reality Change? Controversies Regarding the Yogic Practice School’s Path to Awakening” (John Powers, Deakin University, Australia)

Abstract:

The Yogic Practice School (Yogācāra) is one of the two main traditions of Indian Buddhist philosophy. Its luminaries made significant contributions to epistemology and logic, and they developed a sophisticated vision of the path to awakening aimed at transforming pathological mental patterns and developing attitudes conducive to more skillful engagement with other beings and the world. One of the most important Yogācāra doctrines is the “three natures”: the imputational, the other dependent, and the ultimately real. The first refers to false notions imputed to the phenomena of experience; the second involves viewing phenomena as arising in dependence on causes and conditions, which is correct on the conventional level but mistaken from an ultimate perspective. The ultimately real nature is how sages view things: without the false overlay of the imputational and free from subject-object dichotomy. I will begin with an overview of the three natures and how they function within the Yogācāra soteriological system, and will then discuss how the third—the ultimately real—has largely been mistranslated and misconstrued by contemporary scholars who work on the tradition. This is more than just termininological quibbling because correct understanding of the ultimately real is crucial to the entire Yogācāra project, and it has ramifications for Buddhist practice more generally.

Bio:

John Powers is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Humanities and Professor of Religion at Deakin University in Australia. He is the author of 18 books and more than 100 articles and book chapters, mainly on Buddhist philosophy and history of ideas, as well as environmental history, human rights, and gender, and propaganda. His books include A Bull of A Man: Images of Masculinity, Sex, and the Body in Indian Buddhism (Harvard, 2009) and Dignāga’s Investigation of the Percept and Its Philosophical Legacy (with Douglas Duckworth, David Eckel, Jay Garfield, Sonam Thakchoe, and Yeshes Thabkhas. Oxford, 2017).

Here’s the link to register: bit.ly/3sCe2JH

On-line Lecture: Tillemans, Methodology: Meditations of a philosophical Buddhologist

The Institute for the Cultural and Intellectual History of Asia (IKGA) at the  Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna, is hosting a series of lectures titled “Method and Region.”

The aim of this initiative is to reflect on the relationship between method and region. Here, methodcomprises the entire apparatus that enables us to conduct scholarly studies, including non-European theories and concepts. Region stands for what is contextually specific, such as language, history or thought. The full program is available here.

The first lecture in the series will be on Tuesday, 30 March, 18:00–19:30 CET:

Tom J.F. Tillemans (Emeritus – University of Lausanne) — Methodology: Meditations of a philosophical Buddhologist

Topic: There was a famous incident in the 1980s that sent shivers down spines, and probably still does. A prominent Princeton philosopher put a notice on his office door that philosophy students should just say “No” to the history of philosophy – Western and Eastern alike, I suppose. It may well be that the Princeton philosopher was a bit misinterpreted, but the echo of Nancy Reagan’s right-wing method to combat drug addiction – just say “No” – was unmistakable. I am going to turn the tables and look at some arguments by historians for nay-saying to philosophy, in particular those of historians of Asian thought and specialists in Buddhist Studies. Such arguments, too, don’t fare well. I will close with an instructive example from another field, linguistics, and will add a few morals to the story.

The lecture will be held online and is open to the public. To register, please write to office.ikga(at)oeaw.ac.at.

Upcoming lectures in the series Method and Region are:

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Wu Reviews Makeham, ed., Buddhist Roots of Zhu Xi

Jiang WU has reviewed John Makeham, ed., The Buddhist Roots of Zhu Xi’s Philosophical Thought (Oxford, 2018) in the latest Journal of Chinese Religions; see here. One excerpt:

The current volume under review is thus a welcome step towards reevaluating the Buddhist influence on the formation of Zhu Xi’s Neo-Confucian philosophy. Not only will it rekindle interest in philosophical issues among China specialists, it also helps to correct the previous tendency, or even bias, to overemphasize the social, intellectual, and historical aspects. This dominant approach tends to reduce philosophical arguments to a set of ideological dogmas conditioned by their social and cultural contexts, such as the competition for literati patronage. (p. 304)

CFP: ISCP 22nd Biennial International Conference

Below is information from the ISCP regarding the 22nd International Conference of the International Society for Chinese Philosophy (ISCP):

Dear friends and colleagues of ISCP,
We are pleased to announce the “call for papers” for the 22nd International Conference of the International Society for Chinese Philosophy (ISCP). This ISCP biennial international conference is to take place July 5-8, 2021, in Shanghai, China. The conference will be hosted by East China Normal University and our society’s president Guorong Yang. The languages of the conference are English and Chinese. Please pay special attention to the conference theme and the deadlines.
Members of ISCP will enjoy a substantial discount on the conference registration fee. To renew your membership, please visit https://iscp-online1.org/membership/
Moreover, with the generous support of the Fu Foundation, this year we will continue the tradition of “The Charles Wei-Hsun Fu Foundation-ISCP Essay Contest” that comes with a sizable cash prize. More details will be forthcoming.

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