Category Archives: Chinese philosophy – 中國哲學 – 中国哲学

Columbia Neo-Confucianism Seminar: Lederman on Wang Yangming

The next session of the Columbia University Seminar on Neo-Confucian Studies will convene on Thursday 9/23 from 7-8:30 pm EST, over Zoom.

Our speaker will be Professor Harvey Lederman of Princeton, who will be presenting his forthcoming paper The Introspective Model of Genuine Knowledge in Wang Yangming. Professor Lederman’s draft looks very well-formatted to me, but he says that he will have one more round of copyediting on it, and welcomes typographical comments.

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On-line Talk: Jenco, “Neo-Confucianism Beyond Moral Philosophy”

From Prof. Jun-Hyeok KWAK (郭峻赫) of Sun Yat-sen University:
We are pleased to announce the 19th Comparative Philosophy Workshop which will be held virtually at 16:00 PM to 18:00 PM (Beijing Time), 30th September (Thursday), 2021.
Due to the pandemic across the world, we will have a virtual (on-line) meeting. Should you wish to join the meeting, please email to the workshop coordinator to get the meeting password. We are going to use Tencent Voov Meeting, and any video recording of this meeting is prohibited.
At the 19th Political Philosophy Workshop, Leigh JENCO (LSE) will give a talk, “Neo-Confucianism Beyond Moral Philosophy: Chen Di’s Historical Phonology”

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Coffee Time Talks on Chinese Thought: Body and Mind in the Analects

Body and Mind in the Analects: Embodied Cognition, Digital Humanities, and the Project of Comparative Philosophy

This talk will explore how engaging with the cognitive sciences and digital humanities undermines claims such as this, and more broadly can help us to do our work as scholars of comparative philosophy.

Host: Professor Edward Slingerland, University of British Columbia

Date: Monday September 27, 2021 10:00-11:30am CST

Zoom link:https://slu.zoom.us/j/98495006071

Questions? Email pauline.lee@slu.edu

See full flyer here.

International Society for Chinese Philosophy Summer 2022 ISCP Shanghai International Conference

Posted on behalf of the ISCP Executive Director, Professor Ann Pang-White

We all truly look forward to the Summer 2022 ISCP Shanghai International Conference (postponed from 2021 due to Covid-19) as opportunities to learn from one another and making personal connections. However, considering the ever-changing nature of the pandemic, the difficulty and safety of international travelling (visa, pre-boarding test, quarantine, flight availability and high cost associated with it, etc.), in consultation with the hosting university (East China Normal University), the board has approved holding the conference with a hybrid platform — virtual and in person concurrently. For participants within the Mainland China and scholars outside of China who can and would like to travel to Shanghai, they certainly can participate the conference in person. For those who prefer to participate virtually, they can do so.

The conference registration fee will be lowered because of this new hybrid format. For non-ISCP members, the conference registration fee will be US$50 (approx. RMB300¥); for ISCP members whose dues are paid up to date, it will be free. We encourage current members to renew their membership and interested colleagues to join ISCP to take advantage of this generous offer.

With this new hybrid platform, we also hope more scholars will consider submitting individual abstract or panel proposals for the conference. The submission deadline is DECEMBER 31, 2021.

General timeline remains the same:
Deadline for submission of abstracts and panel proposals: December 31, 2021
Conference Registration: January 1- May 1, 2022
Communication of acceptance: by February 1, 2022

With warmest regards,

Ann A. Pang-White
Executive Director of ISCP
Visit us: https://iscp-online1.org/

New Job Listing: Duke-DKU Global Fellows Program

Applications accepted on a rolling basis up to December 15, 2021, by 5pm (EST). Review of applications will begin on November 1st.

The Duke-DKU Global Fellows Program is designed to offer an international experience to post-doctoral scholars or advanced doctoral students whose records demonstrate excellence in teaching and an interest in pursuing an academic career. Duke-DKU Global Fellows teach at Duke Kunshan University (DKU) for the Undergraduate Program.

Most courses at DKU are taught in 7-week terms; a few courses are taught over a semester. Contact hours for all classes are the same; in particular, the number of contact hours for a 7-week course is the same as a 14-week course. Courses might include sections of common courses, distinct elective courses, lab sections or recitations. Assignment of classes will be determined by Fellow specific expertise and by DKU teaching needs.

The Fellowship is contingent upon successful receipt of the appropriate type of Chinese visa. Fellows may teach for a 7-week term up to a full academic year based on DKU teaching needs and the Fellow’s availability and his/her related education and experience required for immigration purposes.

The award carries a $13,000 stipend ($17,000 for fellows who have completed their PhD) for two courses, a $1,500 allowance for costs related to research or course preparation, travel costs to/from China, health insurance, and a housing allowance.

Post-doctoral fellows or advanced doctoral students from all disciplines are invited to apply. 

To see the full listing click here.

For more info see below.

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TOC: Journal of Confucian Philosophy and Culture Vol. 36

The editors are delighted to announce the publication of Volume 36 of the Journal of Confucian Philosophy and Culture (JCPC), with the Special Topic: Texts and Contexts: Women in Korean Confucianism, and featuring Professor Hwa Yeong Wang as guest editor.

JCPC is published biannually (in February and August) and welcomes contributions of both articles and book reviews by qualified authors from around the world. The journal is cross-disciplinary in its outlook and presents work from philosophers, anthropologists, psychologists, sociologists, historians, theologians, political scientists as well as other disciplines. JCPC examines the historical, doctrinal, literary, social, and political developments that have formed contemporary versions of Confucianism for the purpose of interpreting and exploring Confucianism from a modern perspective. The Journal is indexed in AtlaSerials, BAS (Bibliography of Asian Studies), MLA Directory of Periodicals, and KCI (Korea Citation Index). The attached file contains the cover and complete table of contents of Volume 34.

The complete volume is available online at our web site: http://jcpc.skku.edu/.

On-line lecture: Confucianism and the Political Theory of the Business Corporation

Date: 17 September 2021 (Friday)

Time: 16:00 (HKT)

Venue: Online (This talk will be held via Zoom.)

Participants: Chi Kwok, Lingnan University; Sungmoon Kim, City University of Hong Kong

Registration is required. Please email: joogangl@gmail.com

Click here to view flyer.

Abstract: Despite the burgeoning literature in contemporary Confucian political theory, little effort has been devoted to the exploration of the implications of Confucianism to economic justice. Among the few exceptions, Chan (2013) argues that Confucianism would require a sufficientarian, yet inegalitarian, distributions of economic resources; Kim (2019) suggests that Confucianism could offer an account of the political economy of harmony where distributive values of equality, need, and merit “could have their own place”. Although these are important contributions, these works’ focal point is on developing a general outlook and guiding principles of a Confucian moral economy. This paper argues that the modern relevance of a theory of moral economy depends to a significant degree on whether it could offer an attractive normative account to the legally privileged economic agent, business corporation, which enjoys legal rights such as legal personality, limited liability, asset shielding that are unavailable to other market actors. The paper attempts to build a bridge between contemporary Confucian political theory and political theory of the business corporation for two purposes. First, it offers a better ontological account of the business corporation for Confucian political theory to intervene in debates about the business corporation. Second, it also offers alternative moral resources to develop a political theory of the business corporation beyond the usual liberal democratic framework in the literature.

Public On-line Lecture Series with Robin Wang, Michael Puett, etc.

The Philosophy and Religious Studies Department at the University of Macau invites everyone to a Lecture Series for the Fall term 2021.
 
All the meetings will be held in a hybrid in-person/online format.
15 September, 11:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Prof. ROBIN WANG (Loyola Marymount University)
The Variety of Minds: Why the Dao Mind Is/Becomes Huanghu (Ambiguous and Elusive)?
 
29 September, 5:30-7:00 p.m.
Prof. GIOVANNI BONIOLO (University of Ferrara)
Identity and dementia: a different approach.
 
13 October, 5:30-7:00 p.m.
Prof. HOLGER BRIEL (Beijing Normal University-Hong Kong Baptist University United International College in Zhuhai)
VisonBytes – Seeing in the age of intercultural digitality.
 
27 October, 7:30-9:00 p.m. (TBC)
Prof. MICHAEL PUETT (Harvard University)
TBA
 
10 November, 8:00-9:30 p.m.
Prof. STEVEN CROWELL (Rice University)
Methodological Atheism: An Essay in the Second-Person Phenomenology of Commitment.
 
24 November, 5:30-7:00  p.m.
Prof. PHILIP TONNER (University of Glasgow)
Wayfarers and Dwellers: implications from phenomenological anthropology for ‘roots’ music heritage research.
 

New Book: Origins of Moral-Political Philosophy in Early China: Contestation of Humaneness, Justice, and Personal Freedom

My new book, Origins of Moral-Political Philosophy in Early China: Contestation of Humaneness, Justice, and Personal Freedom, has just been published by Oxford University Press (OUP 2021). It is available in both paperback and hardcover. Use the code AAFLYG6 to get a 30% discount off on the publisher’s website (OUP website). A detailed Table of Contents (including a tentative Chinese translation of ToC) can be found here.

From the publisher’s website:

This book rewrites the story of classical Chinese philosophy, which has always been considered the single most creative and vibrant chapter in the history of Chinese philosophy. Works attributed to Confucius, Mozi, Mencius, Laozi, Zhuangzi, Xunzi, Han Feizi and many others represent the very origins of moral and political thinking in China. As testimony to their enduring stature, in recent decades many Chinese intellectuals, and even leading politicians, have turned to those classics, especially Confucian texts, for alternative or complementary sources of moral authority and political legitimacy. Therefore, philosophical inquiries into core normative values embedded in those classical texts are crucial to the ongoing scholarly discussion about China as China turns more culturally inward. It can also contribute to the spirited contemporary debate about the nature of philosophical reasoning, especially in the non-Western traditions.

This book offers a new narrative and interpretative framework about the origins of moral-political philosophy that tracks how the three normative values, humaneness, justice, and personal freedom, were formulated, reformulated, and contested by early Chinese philosophers in their effort to negotiate the relationship among three distinct domains, the personal, the familial, and the political. Such efforts took place as those thinkers were reimagining a new moral-political order, debating its guiding norms, and exploring possible sources within the context of an evolving understanding of Heaven and its relationship with the humans. Tao Jiang argues that the competing visions in that debate can be characterized as a contestation between partialist humaneness and impartialist justice as the guiding norm for the newly imagined moral-political order, with the Confucians, the Mohists, the Laoists, and the so-called fajia thinkers being the major participants, constituting the mainstream philosophical project during this period. Thinkers lined up differently along the justice-humaneness spectrum with earlier ones maintaining some continuity between the two normative values (or at least trying to accommodate both to some extent) while later ones leaning more toward their exclusivity in the political/public domain. Zhuangzi and the Zhuangists were the outliers of the mainstream moral-political debate who rejected the very parameter of humaneness versus justice in that discourse. They were a lone voice advocating personal freedom, but the Zhuangist expressions of freedom were self-restricted to the margins of the political world and the interiority of one’s heartmind. Such a take can shed new light on how the Zhuangist approach to personal freedom would profoundly impact the development of this idea in pre-modern Chinese political and intellectual history.

Book cover