Category Archives: Confucianism

Wang presents on “Two Korean Women Confucian Philosophers”

Extending New Narratives in the History of Philosophy/Pour de nouveaux récits en histoire de la philosophie (ENN) Partnership is sponsoring an international online conference, Opening Discussions, that “aims to open discussions exploring the philosophies of…historically neglected figures and jumpstart efforts to retell the history of philosophy.” For a more complete description, please see:

https://feministhistoryofphilosophy.files.wordpress.com/2021/11/enn-opening-discussions-cfp-2.pdf

One of the planned sessions focuses on the works of two Korean Women philosophers. This session is scheduled for March 4, from 12:30-2:30 pm PT (3:30-5:30 pm ET). For details please read on!

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AAR Confucian Traditions Panels

The AAR Conference is about to take place; here is information about the Confucian Traditions Group’s panels. Please note that you need to be registered for the conference in order to access the virtual panels.

Even if you are not going physically to San Antonio, you will be able to participate in this year’s Confucian Traditions Unit activities.  We are hosting three panels, and we encourage you to attend all three!  The information is down below.  The first session is in person, and the latter two are virtual.  We hope to see you there, at least on our computer screens.

In-person sessions begin with an A-prefix (i.e., A20-109), whereas Virtual sessions begin with an AV-prefix (i.e., AV21-115)

All Times are Listed in Central Standard Time (CST)

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POSTPONED: Li Zehou on the ‘Deep Structures of Confucianism’ (Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy)

UPDATE: The Student Workers of Columbia University (SWC) went on strike as of November 3, 2021. The Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy respects the SWC’s decision to strike, and hopes that an agreement is reached quickly.

Until then, we have chosen to suspend our seminar meetings, including the previously scheduled meeting for Friday, November 12, in solidarity with the striking students. A revised schedule of meetings will be announced at the appropriate time. Original announcement (now edited), below. – HS

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THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Presents: Li Zehou on the ‘Deep Structures of Confucianism’

Lead Presenter: Andrew Lambert (College of Staten Island, CUNY)
Discussants:  Robert A. Carleo III (East China Normal University), Ryan Nichols (California State University, Fullerton), Emma Buchtel (Hong Kong Education University)

ABSTRACT: Contemporary Chinese intellectual Li Zehou’s cross-cultural methodology blends traditional Confucian thought with thinkers such as Kant and Marx. This seminar addresses the question of culture and its role in Li’s thought. Li has made several claims about how a settled cultural tradition influences the subjects within it. One such claim concerns the existence of ‘deep structures’ of Confucianism, as outlined in this preparatory reading. The idea is that culture, history, and social practice (collectively, a tradition) shape human psychology (including the formation of concepts, emotions, and values) in ways not always apparent to the subject. Within the Chinese tradition, Confucianism constitutes such a deep structure, and its effects cannot be captured by textual studies alone, nor studies of material culture. Rather, the deep structure is articulated in terms of an emergent shared subjectivity. Such traditions can evolve and ultimately dissolve; nevertheless, their effects are deep-rooted. This seminar meeting will aim to identify the parameters of Li’s ambitious theoretical framework and its plausibility, and to explore connections with current work in related fields, such as cultural and empirical psychology.

DATE: TBA
TIME: TBA

This seminar will take place via Zoom (please scroll down for the full invitation). Below you will find the link to join the meeting. Continue reading →

A talk on “Confucian Leadership Democracy for East Asia” on Friday, Oct. 1

This Friday, Oct. 1, at 1pm New York time, Rutgers Center for Chinese Studies is hosting Yutang Jin, a postdoc fellow at Princeton’s Department of Politics, for a talk with the title, “Confucian Leadership Democracy for East Asia.” It is open to the public, but registration is required. Click here to get more info and to register.

New Book: Governing the Realm and Bringing Peace to All below Heaven

AUTHOR: Kumazawa Banzan

EDITOR AND TRANSLATOR: John A. Tucker, East Carolina University

DATE PUBLISHED: January 2021

Kumazawa Banzan’s (1619-1691) Responding to the Great Learning (Daigaku wakumon) stands as the first major writing on political economy in early modern Japanese history. John A. Tucker’s translation is the first English rendition of this controversial text to be published in eighty years. The introduction offers an accessible and incisive commentary, including detailed analyses of Banzan’s text within the context of his life, as well as broader historical and intellectual developments in East Asian Confucian thought. Emphasizing parallels between Banzan’s life events, such as his relief efforts in the Okayama domain following devastating flooding, and his later writings advocating compassionate government, environmental initiatives, and projects for growing wealth, Tucker sheds light on Banzan’s main objective of ‘governing the realm and bringing peace and prosperity to all below heaven’. In Responding to the Great Learning, Banzan was doing more than writing a philosophical commentary, he was advising the Tokugawa shogunate to undertake a major reorganization of the polity – or face the consequences.

For more information or to order the book, see the publisher’s website.

 

On-line Talk: Knapp, “The Birth of Popular Confucianism”

10th June 2021: Prof. Keith Knapp (The Citadel) presenting “The Birth of Popular Confucianism: Evidence from Dunhuang of the Creation of the Twenty-four Filial Exemplars.” 

The Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, University of Cambridge holds a series of talks each term whose overall theme links with Dunhuang and/or the Silk Road. These take place via Zoom on Thursdays and require pre-registration. This week’s talk will begin at 5pm UK Time (BST), lasting an hour with time allocated afterwards for questions, debate, and discussion.

We welcome listeners from all fields who feel that these talks may help their own research or who are curious to know about the diverse topics covered. This seminar series is organised by Dr Imre Galambos with the generous support of the Glorisun Global Network and Dhammachai International Research.

To register for this week’s talk, please follow this link:https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJIodOytrTkpEtBYrzlCaz3_OTikd3n4KMJk

If prompted to enter a passcode, please enter: Dunhuang

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New Journal: International Studies on Confucianism

A new journal, publishing both Chinese-language and English-language articles on Confucianism, has been established jointly by the International Confucian Association and Tsinghua University: 《国际儒学(中英文)》 or  International Studies on Confucianism. More information, including the Table of Contents of the first issue, is here.

2020 Dao Annual Best Essay Award

Winner: Shu-shan Lee, “ ‘What Did the Emperor Ever Say’—The Public Transcript of Confucian Political Obligation,” Dao 19. 2: 231-250

What is the Confucian conception of political obligation? While there is a widespread view
that it demands people’s absolute obedience to their rulers, there are also scholars arguing
that it includes people’s duty to correct rulers. In this award-winning essay, Shu-shan Lee
shows that the former lacks textual support, while the latter confuses Confucian scholar-
officials’ political duty with commoners’ political obligations. Instead, Lee argues,
convincingly, that imperial Confucian political obligation is a conditional theory of
paternalistic gratitude: common people’s obedience to their rulers is an expression of, and
thus is conditional upon, their rulers’ benevolent care for them. This ground-breaking
conception of Confucian political obligation results from Lee’s careful study, integrating
multi-faceted perspectives, philosophical and historical, theoretical and empirical, and
ancient and contemporary. It is the type of research that Dao aims to promote.

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