Category Archives: Confucianism

Who’s Which? Which What?

My guess, really just a guess, is that the discussion of role ethics or relational ethics might benefit from some direct attention to a couple of fallacies available for commission—one minor, one major.  I don’t know whether they’re actually committed or directly discussed in the literature.  Possible examples of each can be found in Henry Rosemont’s essay “Rights-Bearing Individuals and Role-Bearing Persons” (in Mary Bockover, ed., Rules, Rituals, and Responsibility: Essays Dedicated to Herbert Fingarette, Open Court 1991, pp. 71-101).  I’ll make that my text.  I don’t understand it.

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Confucianism and Household Servants?

This post expands a question I asked once in the old Discussions section.

It is sometimes said that the (or a) Ruist picture of moral psychology stresses family because Ruists stress the development of moral sensibilities starting with people’s earliest relationships, which are their childhood relationships at home.  So … what about household servants?

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CFP: Confucian Conference at Bond University, Gold Coast, Australia

The Centre of East-West Cultural and Economic Studies at Bond University is organizing a Confucian Conference, together with the “World Consortium of Research in Confucian Cultures” (led by Prof. Roger Ames) and Beijing Foreign Language University 北京外國語大學 (with Prof. Tián Chénshān 田辰山), on August 28-31st, 2019. Please see the flyer for the details of CFP.

If interested, please contact Dr. Chen directly or the following email contacts:

Dr. James Ferguson: jferguso@bond.edu.au

Cindy Minarova-Banjac: cminarov@bond.edu.au

SKKU Conference on Confucianism, Buddhism, and Kantian Moral Theory

The Sungkyun Institute for Confucian Studies and East Asian Philosophy (SKKU) is delighted to announce that it will host an International Conference on the theme Confucianism, Buddhism, and Kantian Moral Theory, 6-7 September 2019 on the campus of Sunkyunkwan University, Seoul, Korea. This event is made possible by a generous grant from The American Council of Learned Societies with support from the Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation for International Scholarly Exchange.

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