Warp, Weft, and Way

Chinese and Comparative Philosophy 中國哲學與比較哲學

Bern Workshop on Emotions as Skills in Chinese and Græco-Roman Ethics

The Good Life and the Art of Feeling: Emotions as Skills in Chinese and Græco-Roman Ethics
Workshop, University of Bern, June 7-9
The workshop is a part of the project “The Art of Feeling: Cultivated Emotions in Early Chinese and Græco-Roman Thought” at the Institute of Philosophy at the University of Bern (Project description here) and will consist in talks by several prominent scholars of Ancient and Chinese philosophy and open discussions. The poster with more information is here.
The workshop is open to anyone interested, but registration is required to participate in the conference dinner and for accommodation.
For registration and further information, please contact David Machek at david.machek@philo.unibe.ch.

May 16, 2017 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Emotions, Europe | no comments

New Book: Virag, The Emotions in Early China

Oxford University Press has just published Curie Virag’s The Emotions in Early Chinese Philosophy; see here, and the Table of Contents is after the break.

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February 6, 2017 Posted by | Books of Interest, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Emotions | no comments

Discussion of Slote’s “Reset Button”

The article from the current issue of Dao that we have chosen for discussion is Michael Slote’s “The Philosophical Reset Button: A Manifesto,” available via open-access here. This time around, we offer opening comments from both BAI Tongdong of Fudan University, and myself (Steve Angle). Those comments follow here, and let the discussion begin!

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April 9, 2015 Posted by | China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Dao Article Discussion, Emotions | 11 comments

New issue of Dao out / New article discussion upcoming

The latest issue of Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy has been published. We will continue our series of sponsoring discussion of an article from each issue; this time, we have chosen Michael Slote’s “The Philosophical Reset Button: A Manifesto.” It will be set to open-access, and within a week or so we will have a post announcing that the discussion is open. To whet your appetite, here is the abstract:

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March 18, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Confucianism, Dao Article Discussion, Emotions, Profession | no comments

Frontiers of Philosophy in China 10:1

The latest issue of Frontiers of Philosophy in China has been published. Enjoy!

March 4, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Emotions, Philosophy of Mind, Tables of Contents | no comments

Louis CK and Mengzi

This clip (below) from Louis CK’s most recent interview on Conan made a splash on social networks.  The whole thing is pretty funny, but the first minute or so reminded me of Mencius 1A7.

Part of what prevents the king in 1A7 from becoming a genuine king in that passage is his disconnect from his subjects.  He feels the suffering of the ox and this tugs at his sprout of compassion.  By contrast, he doesn’t see the suffering of his subjects, so he feels no sympathy for them and fails to treat them benevolently.

Louis CK raises the same general issue for children today and cellphone use. Continue reading “Louis CK and Mengzi”

November 18, 2013 Posted by | Confucianism, Emotions, Mencius, Moral Psychology | no comments

Against Empathy

The following article in this week’s New Yorker by Yale psychologist Paul Bloom has been circulating in social networks:

The Baby in the Well: The Case Against Empathy

Despite what many of us on this blog might initially wonder, the title of the paper does not refer to Mencius’s famous thought experiment.  (Instead, it refers to the famous case of an actual child in a well that led to a worldwide media circus in the 1980s.)  Nonetheless, the article may be of interest to those of us working in Confucian ethics and moral psychology.

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May 13, 2013 Posted by | Emotions, Ethical Theory, Mencius, Moral Psychology | 3 comments

AAR “Religions in Chinese and Indian Cultures” Group CFP: Emotions

Dear colleagues,

AAR CFP deadline (March 1) is fast approaching. Here is the CFP of our group:

“This Group wishes to explore the various representations of emotions
within the Chinese and Indian religious traditions — particularly
engaging textually with both Chinese and Indian materials. We
especially encourage presentations by a specialist in one tradition to
engage a text from the other tradition….

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February 24, 2013 Posted by | Call for Papers (CFP), Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Emotions, Indian Philosophy, Religion | one comment

CFP From AAR Confucian Traditions Group

The Confucian Traditions Group of the AAR invites proposals concerning any aspect of Confucianism from any geographical area. Topics of particular interest this coming year are:

  • Confucianism, death, and after
  • Confucian interaction with Buddhism
  • archaeological discoveries and Confucian texts
  • contemporary representations of Confucianism, post-modern Confucianism, and/or Confucius Institutes
  • roles and agency in Confucianism
  • feelings and emotions

Proposals for a panel with a well-conceived theme and structure stand the strongest chance of acceptance, whereas proposals for an individual paper do not.

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November 24, 2012 Posted by | Buddhism, Call for Papers (CFP), Confucianism, Contemporary Confucianism, Emotions, Excavated Texts, Religion | no comments

New Books on Women and Confucianism, and on Emotions

Two more recent books, one on women and Confucianism in Choson Korea, the other on emotions in East Asia.

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July 31, 2012 Posted by | Books of Interest, Confucianism, Emotions, Feminism, Korea | no comments