Warp, Weft, and Way

Chinese and Comparative Philosophy 中國哲學與比較哲學

CFA: Comparative Humanities Conference in Hyderabad

Department of Comparative Literature and India Studies, English and Foreign Languages University Hyderabad is pleased to organize a Three-day National Conference on:

COMPARATIVE HUMANITIES: RE-CONFIGURING HUMANITIES ACROSS CULTURES

April 5-7, 2017

[Last date for sending in the abstract: 3rd March, 2017]

Continue reading “CFA: Comparative Humanities Conference in Hyderabad”

February 25, 2017 Posted by | Call for Papers (CFP), Comparative philosophy, Conference, Indian Philosophy | no comments

CFP: “The Art of Commentary” at AAR

From Michael Allen…

The “Indian and Chinese Religions Compared” group of the American Academy of Religion will be hosting a session at this year’s annual meeting in Boston, Nov. 18-21. The theme of the session will be “The Art of Commentary,” and we welcome individual paper proposals (deadline March 1). For more information, please see below.

Continue reading “CFP: “The Art of Commentary” at AAR”

February 18, 2017 Posted by | Call for Papers (CFP), China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Indian Philosophy | no comments

New issue of Confluence

The latest issue of Confluence: Online Journal of World Philosophies, has just been released. It contains about 300 pages of articles, including a symposium led by Jonardon Ganeri on the question, “Is reason a neutral tool in comparative philosophy?” Near the end of the issue is a short survey article I wrote about the competing role ethical and virtue ethical interpretations of early Confucianism.

June 17, 2016 Posted by | Comparative philosophy, Confucianism, Indian Philosophy, Methodology | 2 comments

Call For Proposals: Critical Inquiries in Comparative Philosophy book series

We are currently seeking book proposals for the Critical Inquiries in Comparative Philosophy book series (Rowman and Littlefield International). The volumes in this series aim to present recent research on topics within comparative philosophy generally as well as to present original work on these topics. Right now we are most interested in developing volumes focusing on Chinese Philosophy and/or Indian Philosophy, though proposals on topics in other areas of Asian and Comparative Philosophy are certainly welcome too.

There are currently two volumes of the series in development.  Alexus McLeod’s Theories of Truth in Chinese Philosophy: A Comparative Approach will be released this November, and Bongrae Seok’s Moral Psychology of Confucian Shame: Shame of Shamelessness is due to appear in 2017. Further information on the series and individual volumes can be found at the RLI series webpage.

Those interested in discussing topics or possible proposals for the series should contact Alexus McLeod at alexus.mcleod@colostate.edu

July 30, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Indian Philosophy, Opportunities, Publishing | no comments

Statistics on Asian Philosophy Panels at the 2015 Pacific APA

This last Saturday evening, I was carping to a colleague about the fact that three panels on Chinese philosophy were scheduled simultaneously during the very last time slot of the Group Program of the Pacific APA. Now that the APA has distributed a link to the evaluation survey, I decided to take a look at the actual numbers to see if there is a genuine issue of equity at the conference.

Below are the stats that I got from a first-time run-through of the main and group programs (I’m concerned with Asian philosophy broadly, which I categorized, following the panel titles or society names, as Chinese, Buddhist, Japanese, Comparative, and Martial Arts (didn’t see Indian, alas!)).

Continue reading “Statistics on Asian Philosophy Panels at the 2015 Pacific APA”

April 6, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Indian Philosophy, Japanese philosophy | 2 comments

Interpreting an Alien Philosophy: What Works for Me

[Dear readers: I am happy to present the following invited guest post from Dr. Elisa Freschi of the Austrian Academy of Sciences. Dr. Freschi (BA +MA in Indology and Tibetology, BA in Philosophy, PhD in South Asian Studies) has worked on topics of Classical Indian Philosophy and more in general on comparative philosophy, epistemology, philosophy of religion, philosophy of language and on the re-use of texts in Indian philosophy (about which she has just finished editing a volume). She is a convinced upholder of reading Sanskrit philosophical texts within their history and understanding them through a philosophical approach. She has worked at the Austrian Academy of Sciences since September 1, 2012, with a Lise Meitner project on Epistemology of Sacred Texts in Vedāntadeśika’s Seśvaramīmāṃsā. For more information about her work see here.]

No matter whether one focuses on Classical Chinese philosophy (as probably most readers of this blog) or on Classical Indian philosophy (like myself), one works on something which is different than oneself. I will contend that this feeling is useful also if one focuses on contemporary Chinese, or Indian (or Tibetan and so on) philosophy, or on Classical, Medieval, Modern Western philosophy, since it alerts one to a key factor, namely the difference between oneself and one’s object of study.

Continue reading “Interpreting an Alien Philosophy: What Works for Me”

October 22, 2014 Posted by | Buddhism, Comparative philosophy, Indian Philosophy, Methodology | 24 comments

New Book: India in the Chinese Imagination

India in the Chinese Imagination: Myth, Religion, and Thought
John Kieschnick and Meir Shahar, Editors

http://www.upenn.edu/pennpress/book/15158.html?

Continue reading “New Book: India in the Chinese Imagination”

July 13, 2014 Posted by | Books of Interest, China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Indian Philosophy | no comments

New Book – Nothingness in Asian Philosophy

Nothingness in Asian Philosophy – Routledge 2014

by Douglas Berger (editor) & Jeeloo Liu (editor)

From the Description at Amazon:

“A variety of crucial and still most relevant ideas about nothingness or emptiness have gained profound philosophical prominence in the history and development of a number of South and East Asian traditions—including in Buddhism, Daoism, Neo-Confucianism, Hinduism, Korean philosophy, and the Japanese Kyoto School. These traditions share the insight that in order to explain both the great mysteries and mundane facts about our experience, ideas of “nothingness” must play a primary role.”

Continue reading “New Book – Nothingness in Asian Philosophy”

May 26, 2014 Posted by | Academia, Books of Interest, Buddhism, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Confucianism, Daoism, Indian Philosophy, Japanese philosophy | 3 comments

Philosophers’ Carnival Hosted by The Indian Philosophy Blog

Just a quick heads up that our good friends over at The Indian Philosophy Blog are hosting the 163rd Philosophers’ Carnival. Enjoy!

May 12, 2014 Posted by | Comparative philosophy, Indian Philosophy | one comment

Comparative Political Thought Conference at Yale

There will be a one-day conference, “Comparative Ancient and Medieval Political Thought,” at Yale University on May 1. Details here.

April 7, 2014 Posted by | China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative Political Theory, Conference, Indian Philosophy | no comments

Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy lecture on “Śāstravid: A New Electronic Research Tool for Studying Indian Philosophical Texts” THIS FRIDAY March 28th @5:30pm

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY
and
THE COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF RELIGION
welcome:

 JAN WESTERHOFF (University of Oxford)

Please join us on
Friday, March 28 at 5:30PM 

Continue reading “Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy lecture on “Śāstravid: A New Electronic Research Tool for Studying Indian Philosophical Texts” THIS FRIDAY March 28th @5:30pm”

March 26, 2014 Posted by | Indian Philosophy, Lecture | no comments

CFP: Chinese and Indian Approaches to Cultivation

The AAR “Religions in Chinese and Indian Cultures: A Comparative Perspective” Group is looking for papers on “Cultivation and Its Consequences.” Read on for details.

Continue reading “CFP: Chinese and Indian Approaches to Cultivation”

February 9, 2014 Posted by | Call for Papers (CFP), Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Indian Philosophy | no comments

New Series: Critical Overviews in Comparative Philosophy

From the description at the Rowman and Littlefield International website: http://www.rowmaninternational.com/news/critical-overviews-in-comparative-philosophy

The Critical Overviews in Comparative Philosophy series aims to present detailed and inclusive surveys of contemporary research in multiple areas of Asian and Comparative Philosophy. Each volume will outline and engage with the current research within comparative philosophy through the lenses of traditional philosophical areas such as ethics, metaphysics, epistemology, and language/logic, offering those outside the fields in question (both scholars and students) an up-to-date picture of the work being done in these areas. This series will cover topics in East Asian and South Asian philosophy, primarily in a comparative context.

Each volume will be a single-authored work presenting, synthesizing, and analyzing recent developments in particular areas within a field of comparative research, as well as offering promising directions for future research, outlining possible objections and solutions, and considering ways the area might be further developed. Continue reading “New Series: Critical Overviews in Comparative Philosophy”

January 23, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Indian Philosophy | no comments

New Group Blog of Indian Philosophy Launched

Friend of the blog, Amod Lele, and a group of Indian Philosophy scholars have launched The Indian Philosophy Blog. We welcome it to the comparative philosophy blogosphere!

The list of contributors includes: Douglas Berger, Jason Birch, Daniele Cuneo, Matthew Dasti, Aleix Ruiz Falqués, Elisa Freschi, Elon Goldstein, Stephen Harris, Amod Lele, Ethan Mills, Andrew Ollett, Shyam Ranganathan, Agnieszka Rostalska, Justin Whitaker, and Mike Williams.

January 8, 2014 Posted by | Comparative philosophy, Indian Philosophy | one comment

New Book Series

Sor-hoon Tan has asked me to share information about the new Bloomsbury Research Handbooks in Asian Philosophy.

Bringing together established academics and rising stars, Bloomsbury Research Handbooks in Asian Philosophy survey philosophical topics across all the main schools of Asian thought. Each volume focuses on the history and development of a core subject in a single tradition, asking how the field has changed, highlighting current disputes, anticipating new directions of study, illustrating the Western philosophical significance of a subject and demonstrating why a topic is important for understanding Asian thought.

The first set of titles includes:

  • The Bloomsbury Research Handbook to Chinese Philosophy and Gender, Edited by Ann A. Pang-White, University of Scranton, USA
  • The Bloomsbury Research Handbook to Indian Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art, Edited by Arindam Chakrabarti, University of Hawaii, Manoa, USA
  • The Bloomsbury Research Handbook to Indian Epistemology and Metaphysics, Edited by Joerg Tuske, Salisbury University, USA

Forthcoming volumes include: Chinese Aesthetics; Chinese Moral Psychology; Chinese Philosophy and Methodology; Indian Ethics; Indian Philosophy and Gender

More information is available here.

December 12, 2013 Posted by | Books of Interest, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Indian Philosophy | no comments

Panels at the 2013 AAR Meeting

There will be a number of panels focusing on Chinese and comparative philosophy at the American Academy of Religion annual meeting in Baltimore, MD, beginning this weekend, Saturday, November 23rd, and running through Tuesday, November 26th.  For more information on specifics, see the AAR meeting website: http://www.aarweb.org/annual-meeting/general-information

The following are panels that I thought might be of interest to readers of this blog (these are just the ones I know of- if any of you know of others that may be of interest, feel free to add them in the comments line): Continue reading “Panels at the 2013 AAR Meeting”

November 18, 2013 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Conference, Indian Philosophy, Religion | 2 comments

Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy lecture on Free Will in Indian Philosophy TOMORROW April 26 @5:30pm

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes JOERG TUSKE,  Department of Philosophy, Salisbury University

With responses from David Nowakowski , Department of Philosophy, Princeton University

Please join us at Columbia University Department of Religion on March 22, 2013 at 5:30pm for his lecture entitled

Free Will in Indian Philosophy

ABSTRACT: Recent discussions of free will in Indian Philosophy have mainly focused on the problem in the context of Buddhist Philosophy. Buddhist philosophers reject the existence of the self and the question is whether they also reject the existence of free will. The answers to this question vary from philosophers who claim that Buddhists have to be determinists to philosophers who argue for some form of compatibilism with regards to Buddhist Philosophy. In my talk I will focus on free will in at least one of the non-Buddhist schools of Indian philosophy, the Navya-Nyāya school. I will argue that while the philosophers of this school believed in the existence of a self, it would not be accurate to label them with one of the Western positions on free will. In fact the whole concept of free will is problematic in the context of Indian philosophy. This also has consequences for the Buddhist positions and how we classify them. Continue reading “Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy lecture on Free Will in Indian Philosophy TOMORROW April 26 @5:30pm”

April 25, 2013 Posted by | Indian Philosophy, Lecture | no comments

Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy lecture on the Bhagavad Gita TODAY March 1 @5:30pm

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes SANDEEP SREEKUMAR (The City University of New York, Baruch College)

With responses from Gary Ostertag, Director of the Saul Kripke Center at The Graduate Center, CUNY.

Please join us at Columbia University Department of Religion today (March 1, 2013) at 5:30pm for his lecture entitled

The Elimination of Moral Agency: The Trajectory of Krishna’s Argument in the Gita Continue reading “Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy lecture on the Bhagavad Gita TODAY March 1 @5:30pm”

March 1, 2013 Posted by | Indian Philosophy, Lecture | no comments

AAR “Religions in Chinese and Indian Cultures” Group CFP: Emotions

Dear colleagues,

AAR CFP deadline (March 1) is fast approaching. Here is the CFP of our group:

“This Group wishes to explore the various representations of emotions
within the Chinese and Indian religious traditions — particularly
engaging textually with both Chinese and Indian materials. We
especially encourage presentations by a specialist in one tradition to
engage a text from the other tradition….

Continue reading “AAR “Religions in Chinese and Indian Cultures” Group CFP: Emotions”

February 24, 2013 Posted by | Call for Papers (CFP), Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Emotions, Indian Philosophy, Religion | one comment

Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy lecture on the Bhagavad Gita March 1 @5:30pm

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes SANDEEP SREEKUMAR (The City University of New York, Baruch College)

With responses from Gary Ostertag, Director of the Saul Kripke Center at The Graduate Center, CUNY.

Please join us at Columbia University Department of Religion on February 15, 2013 at 5:30 for his lecture entitled

The Elimination of Moral Agency: The Trajectory of Krishna’s Argument in the Gita

ABSTRACT: I argue here that, seen as a whole (which it rarely is), what appears to be the normative-ethical argument in the Gita is either nothing of the kind or a very odd specimen of the kind, inasmuch as what happens in it is that human moral agency, in the standard sense, is progressively undercut and finally eliminated. Krishna
  • (a) starts off with the usual description of human action oriented towards a particular consequence,
  • (b) moves to the elimination of that consequence and the substitution of other higher-level consequences,
  • (c) analyses those higher-level consequences and strips them of all individual human implications,
  • (d) proceeds to transform human actions themselves into impersonal events, and
  • (e) finally, dissolves the human agent himself into a matrix of causal determinations.
This line of argument, once isolated, must yield certain results: it must say that it is not normativity but strict necessity that governs what we take to be human actions, and it must say that, once this is recognized, moral duties cease to have normative force. And behold, this is exactly what Krishna does say in the end. What we have, as a result, is the elimination of ethics from the world properly grasped and the installation of a form of determinism.
What I now argue is that this manoeuvre is not merely an eliminative metaethical one; it swivels back and re-enters the domain of everyday human moral action and there plays a motivating role. After all, what all this has been in aid of is getting Arjuna to do his duty. There seems to be something like a psychological paradox that this presents: at least so far as the Gita is concerned, the view seems to be that we are likelier to perform our moral duties well not merely if we detach ourselves from the self-regarding consequences of such performance but also if we think that those duties are not really duties in the way that we generally understand them and, moreover, that it is not we who are performing them (or, indeed, any actions) at all.

Time: 5:30-7:30 pm
Place: Rm. 101 in the Department of Religion 80 Claremont Avenue
http://goo.gl/maps/zfUKH

PLEASE VISIT OUR WEBSITE:
http://www.cbs.columbia.edu/cscp/

February 22, 2013 Posted by | Indian Philosophy, Lecture | no comments

Columbia Lecture on Buddhist Metaphysics and Ethics

UPDATE: Today’s Columbia Seminar on Comparative Philosophy meeting, with Jonathan C. Gold and Robert Wright, is CANCELLED due to blizzard forecasts in New York City.  We are planning to reschedule for NEXT Friday, February 15.  Full details to follow.

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes, JONATHAN C. GOLD (Princeton University)

Please join us at Columbia University’ Department of Religion on February 8, 2013 at 5:30 for his lecture entitled,

Accepting the Conditions: “The Ethical Implications of Vasubandhu’s Buddhist Causal Theory”

Continue reading “Columbia Lecture on Buddhist Metaphysics and Ethics”

February 5, 2013 Posted by | Buddhism, Comparative philosophy, Ethical Theory, Indian Philosophy | 5 comments

Call for Papers: Bhagavad Gita and Chinese Philosophy

As a forum for comparative studies between Chinese philosophy and other philosophical traditions in the world, Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy is soliciting contributions that make creative and fruitful use of the vast conceptual resources in the Chinese philosophical traditions to approach central issues and ideas in the Bhagavad Gita for a special issue, with the theme “Bhagavad Gita and Chinese Philosophy,” guest edited by Professor Tao Jiang. The Bhagavad Gita, or simply the Gita, is the best-known Indian religious scripture, and one of the most translated texts in the world along with the Bible and the Dao De Jing (Tao Te Ching). Due to its prominence and influence within India and beyond, the Gita has been the subject of constant scholarly studies in the West, quite often in the context of fruitful comparisons with Western religious and philosophical texts. However, there has been little, if any, effort in the scholarly community to engage the Gita from perspectives arising out of Chinese philosophical texts. In order to facilitate philosophical engagement between Chinese and Indian traditions, we are soliciting papers that draw meaningful and fruitful connections between the ideas presented in the Gita and those in Chinese philosophical texts. The submissions need to be explicitly comparative involving the Gita and some Chinese text/thinker. Please send an electronic copy of your paper by January 31, 2012 to the editor-in-chief, Yong Huang (yhuang@kutztown.edu). If you have any question, please feel free to contact either Yong Huang or the guest editor of the issue, Tao Jiang (tjiang@rci.rutgers.edu).

March 27, 2011 Posted by | Call for Papers (CFP), Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Indian Philosophy | no comments