Warp, Weft, and Way

Chinese and Comparative Philosophy 中國哲學與比較哲學

New Journal and Article on Birth of “Philosophy” in Japan

Tetsugaku: International Journal of the Philosophical Association of Japan is an interesting-looking new journal, and its first issue contains an article called The Birth of Philosophy as 哲學 (Tetsugaku) in Japan.” The article scrutinizes the history of the introduction of the subject from Holland to Japan, the coinage and application of the term tetsugaku (zhexue in Chinese), and its adoption in China during the late-nineteenth century. The article explains a lot about subtle changes in its coverage and nuance during the process. The journal and article are available from the following link:

http://philosophy-japan.org/en/international_journal/volume-1-2017-philosophy-and-the-university/

This open-access journal also welcomes submissions of papers written in English, French or German. Please refer to the document at the bottom of the page.

April 9, 2017 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Japan, Japanese philosophy | no comments

CFP: International Association of Japanese Philosophy

International Association of Japanese Philosophy

2017 International Conference

Date: 28-29 July 2017 (Friday to Saturday)

Venue: National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, Taiwan

Organizer: International Association of Japanese Philosophy (IAJP)

Co-organizer: Research Center for East Asian Culture and Sinology, National Taiwan Normal University

Theme

Globalizing Japanese Philosophy: From East Asia to the World

Continue reading “CFP: International Association of Japanese Philosophy”

January 26, 2017 Posted by | Comparative philosophy, Japan, Japanese philosophy | one comment

New Book on Political Legitimacy

Cambridge University Press has published East Asian Perspectives on Political Legitimacy: Bridging the Empirical-Normative Divide, edited by Joseph Chan, Doh Chuli Shin, and Melissa S. Williams. More details and table of contents here.

December 7, 2016 Posted by | Books of Interest, China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative Political Theory, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, Politics | no comments

New Book: P.J. Ivanhoe, Three Streams

I am happy to announce that Philip J. Ivanhoe’s Three Streams: Confucian Reflections on Learning and the Moral Heart-Mind in China, Korea, and Japan (Oxford University Press, 2016) has been published. See here and here, and a summary follows.

Continue reading “New Book: P.J. Ivanhoe, Three Streams”

October 31, 2016 Posted by | Books of Interest, China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Japan, Korea, Neo-Confucianism | no comments

Upcoming Lecture on Japanese Confucianism

Friday, Nov. 20, 3:00pm at Kent Hall 403 (Columbia University), the ever-stimulating Takahiro Nakajima will speak on “Confucianism for the People in Modern Japan: Ishizaki Tōgoku and Osaka Yōmei Gakkai.” For more information, see here.

November 9, 2015 Posted by | Confucianism, Japan, Lecture | no comments

October’s Columbia Neo-Confucianism Seminar

The next session of the Columbia University Seminar on Neo-Confucian Studies (Seminar #567) will convene Friday, October 2, from 3:30 to 5:30pm in the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University.

John A. Tucker of East Carolina University will present the paper “Yamazaki Ansai’s Discussion of Ren: Heartfelt Ethics and Historical Exemplars.” All are welcome to attend. Please join us after the seminar for dinner at a location to be announced.  If you have any questions, contact one of our organizers: Ari Borrell (aborrell@msn.com), Tao Jiang (tjiang@rci.rutgers.edu), or Deborah Sommer (dsommer@gettysburg.edu).

September 22, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Japan, Neo-Confucianism | no comments

New Book: Daoism in Japan

Today seems to be Daoism Day here at Warp, Weft, and Way. A new book:

Daoism in Japan: Chinese traditions and their influence on Japanese religious culture

Edited by Jeffrey L. Richey

Routledge – 2015 – 268 pages

April 28, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Daoism, Japan, Japanese philosophy | one comment

Columbia Neo-Confucianism Seminar

The next session of the Columbia University Seminar on Neo-Confucian Studies (Seminar #567) will convene Friday, February 7, 2014 from 3:30 to 5:30pm in the Komoda Room of the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University.  We will have two presenters (copies of the papers are available from the organizers):

  • Elizabeth Woo Li.  Her paper is titled “‘Rites as Principles’ (li ji li 礼即理): A Fundamental Concept in Confucian Theories of Ethics and Politics.”
  • P. J. Ivanhoe.  His paper is titled “New Old Foundations for Confucian Ethical Philosophy: Itō Jinsai 伊藤仁斎 (1627-1705), Dai Zhen 戴震 (1722-1776), and Jeong Yakyong 丁若鏞 (1762-1836).”

All are welcome to attend.  Please join us immediately after the seminar for dinner at Columbia Cottage restaurant, which is located on the corner of Amsterdam and 111th Streets.

January 26, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Japan, Korea, Neo-Confucianism, Ritual | no comments

Japan Times Review of Watanabe

Michael Hoffman of the Japan Times reviews the English translation of A HISTORY OF JAPANESE POLITICAL THOUGHT, 1600-1901, by Hiroshi Watanabe (Translated by David Noble. LTCB International Library Trust, International House of Japan, 2012). Hoffman focuses on the “evolution of Japan’s turn away from Confucian ideas.” Looks interesting. Here is some of the review (read the whole review at the Japan Times).

Maybe all ideas are inherently strange, given the nonsense time tends to make of them. Imagine how odd our thinking will seem 100 years from now — or would have seemed 100 years ago. Is “freakish” too strong a word? Whether it is or not, the ideas Watanabe discusses here with such clarity and vigor are the ones that animated two of the most astonishing phases of Japanese and, arguably, world history: the 2½ centuries of peace under the Tokugawa shogunate (1600-1867) and the subsequent national transformation of backwater Japan into superpower Japan.

What were these ideas? You could, simplifying just a bit, divide them into two categories: Confucian and anti-Confucian. For pre-modern Japan, China was civilization itself, and Confucianism was what made it so — “perhaps the most powerful political ideology yet conceived by the human race,” writes Watanabe. To devotees, its “rites and music,” “five relationships” and “five virtues” are what separate us from the beasts and make us human. To doubters — and the doubts grew as Japan’s stagnation became more evident — it was a retarding force. “Ours is a world in which living things are confined and regimented as if dead things,” wrote one exasperated samurai-scholar in 1838. Continue reading “Japan Times Review of Watanabe”

March 7, 2013 Posted by | Book Review, Confucianism, Japan | no comments

CFP: Human Development in Asia

Please see this site for more information, and a call for papers, concerning a conference to be held this summer in Japan on Human Development in Asia.

February 11, 2013 Posted by | Call for Papers (CFP), Comparative philosophy, Comparative Political Theory, Conference, Democracy, Japan | no comments

Harvard Lecture: Bushido as Philosophy of Death in Modern Japan

Thursday, February 7, 12:00 p.m.
Beyond the Samurai: Bushido as Philosophy of Death in Modern Japan
Chris Goto-Jones, Professor of Comparative Philosophy and Political Thought, and Dean of Leiden University
Moderator: Andrew Gordon, Lee and Juliet Folger Fund Professor of History, Harvard University
Porte Room (S250), CGIS South Bldg., 1730 Cambridge St.
Reischauer Institute special presentation

February 5, 2013 Posted by | Japan, Lecture | no comments

New Journal: The Journal of Japanese Philosophy

The Journal of Japanese Philosophy aims to publish its first issue in the Spring of 2013. Here is a description from its website:

The Journal of Japanese Philosophy (JJP, hereinafter) is the first and only international peer-reviewed journal on Japanese philosophy, an academic area that has been receiving increasing global attention for some time now. By enhancing the quality of research through a worldwide, recognized consortium of scholars, this journal intends to provide an international platform for Japanese philosophy, and to further establish an academic status that other philosophical traditions such as Chinese and Indian philosophies already enjoy.

Continue reading “New Journal: The Journal of Japanese Philosophy”

December 31, 2012 Posted by | Comparative philosophy, Japan, Journal News | no comments