Category Archives: Journal Related

2017 Dao Annual Best Essay Award 

Professor Yong Huang, Editor of Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy, announces: 

Results of the 2017 Dao Annual Best Essay Award 

Dao has established “The Annual Best Essay Award” since 2007. In addition to a certificate of achievement, the award comes along with a prize of US$1,000. The award winners are noted in the website of the journal as well as the website of Springer, the publisher of the journal. The award ceremony is held each year at the American Philosophical Association Annual Meeting (Eastern Division) in January, where a special panel on the theme of the award winning essay is held. The critical comments and the author’s responses to them presented at the panel, after revision, will be published in the last issue of Dao each year.

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Diversity in Philosophy Journals: A Discussion

This morning at the APA Pacific there was a wide-ranging discussion on the topic of diversity in philosophy journals. The session was chaired by Eric Schwitzgebel, who introduced it as possibly the largest panel ever at the Pacific APA, featuring 7 presenters including Manyul Im, and 15 journal editor-panelists including Franklin Perkins. The audience was also substantial. Continue reading →

BJHP Welcomes Non-Western Philosophy

Michael Beaney, editor of the British Journal for the History of Philosophy, recently wrote me to call my attention to his most recent editorial at the journal. Its penultimate paragraph reads, in part:

At the BJHP we will continue to publish the very best articles on the ‘canonical’ figures, but we will also be redoubling our efforts to broaden that canon as much as we can. As we move forward, what we would like to promote, above all, is more work on non-Western philosophy, especially where it seeks to deepen dialogue between the various traditions through critical engagement and fruitful comparison. So here, in particular, we would like to underline that we welcome submissions that discuss non-Western philosophy even if our record to date might suggest otherwise.

This is of course very welcome. For more an earlier discussion of publishing in the history of Chinese philosophy, see here.

Submissions on Comparison solicited by JWP

From the Journal of World Philosophies Facebook page:

Professor Nathan Sivin (Pennsylvania) would like to engage with the journal’s readers on the topic ‘Why Some Comparisons Make More Difference than Others’. We invite readers to submit their own short takes on the topic via the OJS site by 15 January 2017. Together with Professor Sivin, the journal’s editorial team will select about 4 respondents on the basis of the submitted abstracts. Abstracts should not exceed more than 250 words. They should include a title, 5-8 keywords, and a short bio.

WWWOPY Follow-Up: Please share your ideas

Some of you may remember that Hagop Sarkissian and I announced a while back a plan to acknowledge top papers on Chinese philosophy (journal articles and anthology chapters) via something we called the WWWOPY (Warp, Weft, and Way Outstanding Papers of the Year). Following the announced procedure, we wrote to a wide range of research-active colleagues (both junior and senior, and of various methodological and theoretical backgrounds) to solicit nominations. However, we received zero replies with nominations. So we are re-thinking our idea.

We subsequently wrote again to the same set of twenty-four colleagues, telling them what happened and asking (1) whether they thought this was a good idea, and (2) whether they had suggestions to make it work better. This time almost everyone replied, but there was little consensus. In reflecting on all the feedback, we did conclude that especially in a growing field with an increasing number of new voices, finding a way to call attention to particularly valuable, recent, article-length work still seems like a good idea. Many people told us that they did not keep regular tabs on this kind of new work, only digging in when they began a new project. But this means that too many people may be missing ideas that should prompt new or different kinds of research projects in the first place, among other consequences.

However we are a bit stymied about how to proceed, and so decided to open this topic up for general discussion. It is hard to find an approach that seems likely to be both useful and practical. Please share your thoughts!

Journal of World Philosophies announcement

An announcement from Monika Kirloskar-Steinbach (Universität Konstanz, Department of Philosophy):

The journal Confluence: Online Journal of World Philosophies has now moved to Indiana University Press. It will be published as an Open Access journal under the title Journal of World Philosophies. Our first issue is scheduled to appear in December 2016. (Confluence’s first four volumes are now found under: https://scholarworks.iu.edu/iupjournals/index.php/confluence/index.)

The journal’s Facebook page is to be found under: https://www.facebook.com/Journal-of-World-Philosophies-323570801356967/?ref=bookmarks. I hope to meet you there (I’m going to initiate a discussion on world philosophies after this mailing).

[Congratulations to Prof. Kirloskar-Steinbach and co-editor Jim Maffie on this new phase of their project. The Facebook page includes the table of contents for the new issue; looks very interesting! –TC]

Publishing on the History of Chinese Philosophy

The recent discussion of the scope of “philosophy” reminded me of Amy Olberding’s excellent idea that those of us with tenure, at least, should make a point of endeavoring to publish in “general” philosophy journals, at least some of the time. (Just to be clear: this is no criticsm of existing journals focused on Chinese or comparative philosophy!) I am finishing up an essay on how to understand (and translate) tian in the context of Neo-Confucianism, and thought that it might make sense to try submitting it to a general history of philosophy journal. Which to choose? I decided to do a little research. I was pretty sure that Brian Leiter’s blog would have some sort of ranking of such journals, and sure enough, it does (from 2010). What surprised me was what I found when I started looking at the journals’ websites.

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Journal Rankings

I am not sure what exactly to make of this data, which is based on a ranking system that may make ore sense for the sciences than for the humanities, but here is the latest ranking of philosophy journals, based on rates of citation over the last three years. This certainly is not the only measure of journal quality, but perhaps something worth taking into account.