Warp, Weft, and Way

Chinese and Comparative Philosophy 中國哲學與比較哲學

Wang Hui et al on Contemporary China (Harvard)

Thursday, February 23, 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Liberalism, Globalization, Populism and Nationalism in the World Today
Wang Hui, Professor of literature and history at Tsinghua University
David Armitage, Lloyd C. Blankfein Professor of History, Harvard University
Malika Zeghal, Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Professor in Contemporary Islamic Thought and Life, Harvard University
Mahdav Khosla, B. R. Ambedkar Academic Fellow, Columbia Law School and Ph.D. candidate in political theory, Harvard University.
James Kloppenberg, Charles Warren Professor of American History, Harvard University
Moderator: Peter Bol, Vice Provost for Advances in Learning and the Charles H. Carswell Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University
Sponsored by the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard University
S010, Tsai Auditorium, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

February 20, 2017 Posted by | China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Comparative Political Theory, Lecture | no comments

Angle to speak at HKBU on Wednesday, Feb 15

I know, all this self-promotion is getting a little embarrassing, but it’s great seeing old friends and meeting new ones. And if you are giving a lecture on a Warp, Weft, and Way topic, anywhere in the world, let me know and I’ll share the news! In any event: I’m lecturing on “Human Rights and Chinese Tradition” at 3:30pm on Wednesday, Feb 5 at Hong Kong Baptist University. It is free and open to the public, though they request registration; details are here.

February 13, 2017 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Human Rights, Lecture | one comment

Angle to speak at CUHK on Monday, Feb 13

I will give a lecture titled “Confucian Leadership Meets Confucian Democracy” at the Chinese University of Hong Kong on Monday, February 13, at 4:30pm. All are welcome, and details are here.

February 9, 2017 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Comparative Political Theory, Contemporary Confucianism, Hong Kong, Lecture | no comments

Van Norden at BU on March 23

The Boston University Confucian Association will host a lecture by Bryan Van Norden titled “Like Loving a Lovely Sight: Simile and Metaphor in Chinese Philosophy” on March 23, 2017 at 5:30pm. Details are here.

January 30, 2017 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Confucianism, Lecture | no comments

Irene Cronin (UCLA): The Notion of Accepted Contradiction in Early Chinese Daoism. 12 Dec 2016 at CUNY Graduate Center

FALL 2016 Logic and Metaphysics Workshop

DateMonday December 12, 4.15-6.15

Place: Room 5382, CUNY Graduate Center.

Speaker: Irena Cronin, UCLA

TitleThe Notion of Accepted Contradiction in Early Chinese Daoism

Abstract: Although the representation of the Dao differs a little between the representative Early Chinese Daoist works Zhuangzi and Dao de jing, the differences are one of degree, rather than “substance”.  In Zhuangzi, the common man as possible master craftsman, whether it be as a cook, woodmaker, or fisherman, or other kind of craftsman, has the capability of understanding and embracing the Dao (although these occurrences would be relatively rare), while in Dao de jing, it is only the Sage, a rare man of extreme ability that can do so; all others do not have this capability and have minor, shadowy and totally indeterminable experiences of the Dao, and are “condemned” to live an ignorant and almost animal-like existence, finding solace in creature comforts.

Continue reading “Irene Cronin (UCLA): The Notion of Accepted Contradiction in Early Chinese Daoism. 12 Dec 2016 at CUNY Graduate Center”

December 5, 2016 Posted by | Daodejing, Daoism, Laozi, Lecture, Logic | no comments

Alexus McLeod – Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy Lecture: “The Madman of Chu: The Problem of Mental Illness and Self-Cultivation in Early Chinese Texts”, Dec. 2 @ 5:30pm

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes: ALEXUS MCLEOD (University of Connecticut)
With responses from: ANDREW MEYER (Brooklyn College, CUNY)

Please join us at Columbia University’s Religion Department on FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2nd at 5:30PM for his lecture entitled:

The Madman of Chu: The Problem of Mental Illness and Self-Cultivation in Early Chinese Texts

ABSTRACT: In Confucian and Zhuangist texts of the Pre-Han and Han period, we see characters described as “crazy, mad” (狂 kuang), and find descriptions or discussions of madness or mad persons—most prominently the infamous Jieyu, “Madman of Chu”. I argue that madness is seen by Confucians and Zhuangists as a kind of moral deformity that moves one outside of the boundaries of ritual and society and thus full personhood—a fact that leads the Confucians to shun mad people, and the Zhuangist to praise them.  Madness is seen not as a 病 bing (disorder, illness), but instead as based on a cultivated choice.   Continue reading “Alexus McLeod – Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy Lecture: “The Madman of Chu: The Problem of Mental Illness and Self-Cultivation in Early Chinese Texts”, Dec. 2 @ 5:30pm”

November 17, 2016 Posted by | Analects, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Huainanzi, Lecture, Self-Cultivation, Zhuangzi | no comments

Angle at LaTrobe — Lecture

I will be speaking at LaTrobe University in Melbourne tomorrow; the topic is “Why Comparative Philosophy Matters.” Details:

Date: Wednesday 16th November 2016
Time: 4:00 – 6:00pm
Venue: Martin Building, Level 3, Room 369, La Trobe University
Cost: Free
Enquiries: csrc@latrobe.edu.au

In addition, I will be in Melbourne through Saturday, and if anyone wants to get together and talk Chinese philosophy, please send me an email!

November 15, 2016 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Lecture | no comments

Angle lecture in Beijing Sunday 11/20

For anyone who’ll be in Beijing on the 20th, you are welcome to my lecture that evening, the title of which is “从进步儒学的角度看社会压迫 [Social Oppression as Viewed by Progressive Confucianism”].” Details follow. Please feel free to contact me with any questions.

Continue reading “Angle lecture in Beijing Sunday 11/20”

November 10, 2016 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Comparative Political Theory, Contemporary Confucianism, Lecture | 2 comments

Lecture in Berlin: Nelson on Neo-Confucianism and Buddhism

Prof. Dr. Eric NELSON (Division of Humanities, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology):

The Debate between Neo-Confucianism and Buddhism in Jeong Dojeon and Gihwa

Nov. 30, 2016; 18:00-20:00. More information here.

Continue reading “Lecture in Berlin: Nelson on Neo-Confucianism and Buddhism”

October 14, 2016 Posted by | Buddhism, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Korea, Lecture, Neo-Confucianism | no comments

Eric Schwitzgebel – Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy Lecture: “Death and Self in the Incomprehensible Zhuangzi”, THURSDAY Oct.13 @ 5:30pm

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes: ERIC SCHWITZGEBEL (University of California Riverside)
With responses from: CHRISTOPHER GOWANS (Fordham University)

Please join us at Columbia University’s Religion Department on *THURSDAY*, OCTOBER 13th at 5:30PM for his lecture entitled:

“Death and Self in the Incomprehensible Zhuangzi”

ABSTRACT: The ancient Chinese philosopher Zhuangzi defies interpretation. This is an inextricable part of the beauty and power of his work. The text – by which I mean the “Inner Chapters” of the text traditionally attributed to him, the authentic core of the book – is incomprehensible as a whole. It consists of shards, in a distinctive voice. Despite repeating imagery, ideas, style, and tone, these shards cannot be pieced together into a self-consistent philosophy. This lack of self-consistency is a positive feature of Zhuangzi. It is part of what makes him the great and unusual philosopher he is, defying reduction and summary.  In this talk, I will look at Zhuangzi’s inconsistent remarks about death and the self. Continue reading “Eric Schwitzgebel – Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy Lecture: “Death and Self in the Incomprehensible Zhuangzi”, THURSDAY Oct.13 @ 5:30pm”

October 5, 2016 Posted by | Daoism, Lecture, Zhuangzi | no comments

Tongdong Bai to speak at Boston Univ.

The Boston University Confucian Association is sponsoring a lecture by Prof. Tongdong BAI of Fudan University on September 28, 2016. The topic is “A New Confucian Tianxia Model and Its Superiority to the Nation-State and Liberal Models.” Please see here for more details.

September 11, 2016 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Comparative Political Theory, Lecture | no comments

Tao Jiang – Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy Lecture: “Between Philosophy and History: The Challenge of Authorship to Classical Chinese Philosophy in the Western Academy”, Sep.23 @ 5:30pm

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes: TAO JIANG (Rutgers University)

With responses from: ESKE MØLLGAARD (University of Rhode Island)

Please join us at Columbia University’s Religion Department on FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23rd at 5:30PM for his lecture entitled:

“Between Philosophy and History: The Challenge of Authorship to Classical Chinese Philosophy in the Western Academy”

 ABSTRACT: The tension between philosophical and historical inquiries has been a perennial problem. Within the modern academy, the disciplines of philosophy and history are protected by their respective institutional norm and practice, without much need for interaction. However, Chinese philosophy, situated between Sinology and philosophy in the western academy, has encountered extraordinary challenges from both Sinologists (most of whom are historians) and (Western) philosophers. At the root of the difficulty facing Chinese philosophy lies its very legitimacy, torn between the historicist orientation of Sinology and the presentist orientation of mainstream contemporary Western philosophy. Such divergent disciplinary norms have put scholars of Chinese philosophy in a difficult position. On the one hand, they have to defend the philosophical nature, or even the philosophical worthiness, of classical Chinese texts in front of contemporary Western philosophers whose interests tend to be more issue-driven and in the philosophical integrity of ideas, rather than the historicity of ideas. At the same time, these scholars of Chinese philosophy, when dealing with Sinologists, need to justify the basic premise of their philosophical approach to the classics due to the historical ambiguity and compositional instability of these texts. Continue reading “Tao Jiang – Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy Lecture: “Between Philosophy and History: The Challenge of Authorship to Classical Chinese Philosophy in the Western Academy”, Sep.23 @ 5:30pm”

September 4, 2016 Posted by | History of Philosophy, Lecture, Sinology, Zhuangzi | 11 comments

Csikszentmihalyi at Sungkyunkwan University

Mark Csikszentmihalyi (UC Berkeley) will be speaking on “Confucian Religion, Confucian Philosophy, and The Double Lens of Comparative Studies” on June 25 at Sungkyunkwan University in Korea. More information is here, and the abstract follows.

Continue reading “Csikszentmihalyi at Sungkyunkwan University”

June 20, 2016 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Lecture | no comments

Jenco at Harvard: How Should We Use the Chinese Past?

Leigh Jenco (LSE) will be speaking at Harvard on May 2 at 4:00pm. Her title is “How Should We Use the Chinese Past?: Non-Western Histories of Thought in a Global Age.” More information here.

April 22, 2016 Posted by | China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Comparative Political Theory, Lecture | no comments

Columbia Neo-Confucian Seminar: Brook Ziporyn “Zhu Xi on the Consciousness and Unconsciousness of the Mind of Heaven and Earth” this Friday, April 22 @ 3:30pm

The next session of the Columbia University Seminar on Neo-Confucian Studies (University Seminar #567) will convene Friday, April 22, 2016 from 3:30 to 5:30pm in the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University.

Brook Ziporyn (University of Chicago) will present his paper “Zhu Xi on the Consciousness and Unconsciousness of the Mind of Heaven and Earth: Cross-Cultural Considerations of Ontological Theism and Atheism.”

All are welcome to attend. Copies of his paper and other information are available from the organizers: Ari Borrell , Tao JiangOn-cho Ng, or Deborah Sommer.

April 16, 2016 Posted by | Lecture, Philosophy of Mind, Zhu Xi | no comments

Allan on Confucius and Abdication at Harvard (and in NYRB)

Monday, April 11, 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.
The Rise of Confucius and Legends of Abdication in Light of Warring States Period Bamboo Manuscripts
Speaker: Sarah Allan, Burlington Northern Foundation Professor of Asian Studies in honor of Richard M. Dressler at Dartmouth College, chair of the Society for the Study of Early China, and editor of Early China
Sponsored by the Harvard University Fairbanks Center for Chinese Studies
S250, 2nd Floor, CGIS South, 1730, Cambridge Street, Cambridge, MA

More information here.

Subscribers to the New York Review of Books can also read Ian Johnson’s “A Revolutionary Discovery in China” in the April 21 issue, which is a review essay based on Sarah Allan’s book Buried Ideas: Legends of Abdication and Ideal Government in Early Chinese Bamboo-Slip Manuscripts.

April 3, 2016 Posted by | Books of Interest, China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Confucianism, Excavated Texts, Lecture | no comments

Angle: “How Buddhist is Neo-Confucianism?”

I trust that everyone who is interested has heard about the upcoming Rutgers Workshop on Chinese Philosophy (RWCP), “Conversations with Western Philosophers”; more info is here. The prior afternoon, I will be giving a public lecture in which some may be interested:

“How Buddhist is Neo-Confucianism? The Roots and Branches of Zhu Xi’s Epistemology”

Thursday, April 14, 2016, 4:30-6:00pm.  Pane Room, Alexander Library, College Avenue Campus, Rutgers University.  Free and open to the public.

April 3, 2016 Posted by | Buddhism, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Lecture | 7 comments

Lecture on Wen (文)

PHILOSOPHIZING THE CONCEPT OF “WEN (文)”: BEGINNING FROM TAKEDA TAIJUN’S SHIBA SEN

APR 5, 12:00–1:30pm

Harvard Yenching Institute Common Room, 2 Divinity Ave., Cambridge

Ishii Tsuyoshi (Associate Professor, Area Studies, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the University of Tokyo; HYI Visiting Scholar)

Chair/discussant: David Wang (Edward C. Henderson Professor of Chinese Literature, East Asian Languages and Civilizations Department, Harvard University)

For more information, see here.

March 27, 2016 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Lecture | no comments

Harvey Lederman – Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy Lecture: “Weakness of the Will and Liangzhi in Wang Yangming”, Mar.18 @ 5:30pm

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes: HARVEY LEDERMAN (New York University)
With responses from: STEVE ANGLE (Wesleyan University)

Please join us at Columbia University’s Religion Department on FRIDAY, MARCH 18th at 5:30PM for his lecture entitled:

Weakness of the Will and Liangzhi in Wang Yangming”

This paper starts from Wang Shouren’s (王守仁, Yangming 陽明 1472-1529) doctrines concerning weakness of the will, with the aim of developing an interpretation of his theory of “intuition” (l ́ıangzh ̄ı 良知). Wang famously insisted on the “unity of knowledge and action” (知行合一). “Action” is understood in this claim as the subject’s affect; to act appropriately is to have the ethically appropriate affective response. In claiming that knowledge and action are one Wang claims that one form of weakness of the will is impossible: if one knows piety (for example), one is guaranteed to have a pious affective response, that is, to act piously. Wang held that humans have an innate capacity to respond to stimuli with ethically appropriate affect, and that the explanation of this capacity somehow involves the faculty of “intuition” (良知), the faculty by which one obtains moral knowledge. But how does intuition yield moral knowledge? And how does this knowledge guarantee that one will have the affect appropriate to the circumstances? Continue reading “Harvey Lederman – Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy Lecture: “Weakness of the Will and Liangzhi in Wang Yangming”, Mar.18 @ 5:30pm”

March 4, 2016 Posted by | Comparative philosophy, Lecture, Wang Yangming | no comments

Zarrow at Neo-Confucianism Seminar Tomorrow

The next session of the Columbia University Seminar on Neo-Confucian Studies (University Seminar #567) will convene March 4, Friday, 2016 from 3:30 to 5:30pm in the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University.

Peter Zarrow will present the paper “Utopianism and Moralities of the Self: Views of Chinese Radicals, 1900-1925.” 

All are welcome to attend.   Please feel free to forward this message to interested colleagues.  Please join us after the seminar for dinner at a location to be announced.

Looking ahead to April, our April speaker will be Brook Ziporyn.  To avoid conflicting with the annual AAS conference, the April 2016 meeting will convene on April 22.

March 3, 2016 Posted by | China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Lecture | no comments

Livia Kohn at Bridgeport Tomorrow

Livia Kohn to speak tomorrow at the University of Bridgeport; see here:

CPIA East Asia Forum Livia Kohn

March 1, 2016 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Daoism, Lecture | no comments

Joshua Mason – Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy Lecture: “Cognitive Linguistics and Cultural Gulfs: From Embodied Metaphors to Responsible Generalizations”, Feb. 26 @5:30pm

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes: JOSHUA MASON (West Chester University of Pennsylvania)
With responses from: DEREK SKILLINGS (CUNY Graduate Center)

Please join us at Columbia University’s Religion Department on FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26th at 5:30PM for his lecture entitled:

Cognitive Linguistics and Cultural Gulfs: From Embodied Metaphors to Responsible Generalizations”

ABSTRACT: An ongoing debate in comparative research is about whether we should see cultural diversities as manifestations of essential differences or as superficial variations on a universal blueprint. Edward Slingerland has pointed to cognitive linguistics and the use of embodied metaphors to emphasize the universality of concept formation and cognition across cultures. He suggests that this should quiet the “cultural essentialists” who take fundamental differences in eastern and western thinking as their starting points. Michael Puett has also leveled a critique of cultural essentialism in support of a presuppositionless approach, and Slingerland’s conclusions seem to offer him support. However, I will argue that even if all modern humans are broadly similar in metaphor use and cognitive processes, research in the humanities must continue to account for the differences implied by the particular metaphors employed and emphasized in diverse traditions. I contend that responsible hermeneutic practice does this through provisional, yet indispensable, generalizations. A starting point which recognizes the existence of cultural gulfs will facilitate, not vitiate, future advances in cross-cultural understanding. Continue reading “Joshua Mason – Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy Lecture: “Cognitive Linguistics and Cultural Gulfs: From Embodied Metaphors to Responsible Generalizations”, Feb. 26 @5:30pm”

February 15, 2016 Posted by | Comparative philosophy, Lecture | 4 comments

Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy – Spring 2016 Speakers

We are excited to share with you our upcoming lineup of speakers:

February 26: Joshua Mason (West Chester University)

March 18: Harvey Lederman (NYU)

April 8: Shigenori Nagatomo (Temple University)

April 29: Sara McClintock (Emory University)

We will provide more information regarding the topic of each speaker’s presentation as the semester progresses. We hope to see you all at what promises to be a semester of discussion and engagement.

Inquiries should be directed to one of the following individuals:

Co-Chairs
Professor Jonathan Gold
Associate Professor, Princeton University, Department of Religion
jcgold@princeton.edu

Professor Hagop Sarkissian
Associate Professor, The City University of New York, Baruch College, Department of Philosophy
hagop.sarkissian@baruch.cuny.edu

Rapporteur
Daniel M. del Nido
dmd2167@columbia.edu

January 17, 2016 Posted by | Comparative philosophy, Lecture | no comments

Shaughnessy on Excavated Texts at Wisconsin

Edward Shaughnessy (University of Chicago) who will be Halls-Bascom Visiting Fellow at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in early April 2016 will hold a Workshop on Recently Excavated Texts on 7 April 2016 from 2:30-4:30 p.m. (location on the UW Campus still to be arranged). Zhi Chen (Hong Kong Baptist University) will serve as discussant. It is hoped that scholars from other “neighboring universities” will consider joining the Workshop. Although we have no travel funds, there will be a light-dinner reception following the Workshop to allow the discussion to continue into the evening. For further information please contact Bill Nienhauser (whnienha@wisc.edu).

January 2, 2016 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Chinese Texts, Excavated Texts, Lecture | no comments

Karsten Struhl & Graham Priest, Columbia Seminar for Comparative Philosophy: “Buddhism and Marxism: Points of Intersection” — December 11 @ 5:30pm

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes:

KARSTEN STRUHL (John Jay College) and GRAHAM PRIEST (CUNY Graduate Center)

Please join us at Columbia University’s Religion Department on FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11th at 5:30PM for their lecture entitled:

“Buddhism and Marxism: Points of Intersection”

Although Marxism and Buddhism might seem like unlikely bedfellows, they have a number of things in common. Continue reading “Karsten Struhl & Graham Priest, Columbia Seminar for Comparative Philosophy: “Buddhism and Marxism: Points of Intersection” — December 11 @ 5:30pm”

November 23, 2015 Posted by | Buddhism, Comparative philosophy, Lecture | no comments

Buber on the Daodejing: Next week at Harvard

Monday, November 16, 4:00 – 6:00 p.m.
China Humanities Seminar: Laozi the Existentialist: Martin Buber’s Transformation of the Daodejing
Speaker: Jonathan Herman, Associate Professor, Department of Religious Studies, Georgia State University
Sponsored by the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies
K262, Bowie-Vernon Room, CGIS Knafel, 1737 Cambridge St., Cambridge, MA

November 10, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Daodejing, Daoism, Lecture | no comments

Two Lectures in Boston on Thursday

An embarrassment of riches! This coming Thursday, interested folks in the Boston area can choose from the following two options (Prof. Ci’s lecture is part of the series he has been giving at Harvard; see here; see also here for a related conference on Friday):

Thursday, November 12, 4:30 p.m.

A Realistic Utopia for China, Democratic or Otherwise

Ci Jiwei, Professor, Department of Philosophy, University of Hong Kong

Commentator: Stephen Angle, Professor of Philosophy and Mansfield Freeman Professor of East Asian Studies, Wesleyan University

Harvard Law School, Austin Hall, The Morgan Courtroom


Thursday, November 12, 5:00 – 6:00 p.m.

The Values of Spontaneity

Professor Philip J. Ivanhoe, Chair Professor of East Asian and Comparative Philosophy & Religion, City University of Hong Kong; Director of the Center for East Asian and Comparative Philosophy (CEACOP); Director of the Laboratory on Korean Philosophy in Comparative Perspectives

This talk will discuss two Chinese views of spontaneity found in Confucian and Daoist texts from the pre-Qin (before 221 B.C.E.) period.

The Daniel C Morrissey ’88 and Chanannait Paisansathan, MD Lecture Series in Asian Studies, Boston College

Fulton 511, Boston College, 140 Commonwealth Ave., Chestnut Hill, MA

November 9, 2015 Posted by | China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Comparative Political Theory, Lecture | no comments

Upcoming Lecture on Japanese Confucianism

Friday, Nov. 20, 3:00pm at Kent Hall 403 (Columbia University), the ever-stimulating Takahiro Nakajima will speak on “Confucianism for the People in Modern Japan: Ishizaki Tōgoku and Osaka Yōmei Gakkai.” For more information, see here.

November 9, 2015 Posted by | Confucianism, Japan, Lecture | no comments

This Friday’s Columbia Neo-Confucianism Seminar

The next session of the Columbia University Seminar on Neo-Confucian Studies will convene Friday, November 6, 2015 from 3:30 to 5:30pm in the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University.

Eske Mollgaard will present the paper “Can Confucians Universalize Themselves?”  Please contact the organizers for a copy.

All are welcome to attend. Please join us after the seminar for dinner at a location to be announced.

If you have any questions, contact one of our organizers: Ari Borrell (aborrell@msn.com), Tao Jiang (tjiang@rci.rutgers.edu), or Deborah Sommer (dsommer@gettysburg.edu).

November 4, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Comparative Political Theory, Contemporary Confucianism, Lecture, Politics | no comments

Upcoming Academia Sinica Lectures

Two upcoming lectures at Taiwan’s Academia Sinica may be of interest to folks in the area:

Thursday, Oct 29, 10:00 a.m., 安靖如 (Stephen C. Angle), “將宋明理學當作哲學來教 (Teaching Neo-Confucianism as Philosophy),” 中國文哲研究所二樓會議室

Friday, Oct 30, 2:30 p.m., 許紀霖, “新天下主義與東亞的普遍性,” 中研院人社中心一樓中庭會議室 (Register here: http://www.rchss.sinica.edu.tw/conf/20151030/)

October 27, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Contemporary Confucianism, Lecture, Neo-Confucianism, Taiwan | 2 comments

Panel with Daniel Bell on The China Model at Duke

Daniel Bell will join five panelists to discuss his book The China Model: Political Meritocracy and the Limits of Democracy (Princeton, 2015) at Duke University on Monday, October 19, 5-6:30pm. Details are here.

October 2, 2015 Posted by | China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative Political Theory, Lecture, Political Theory | no comments

Harvard Lecture: Ethics and Professions in Asia

Ethics and the Professions – Good Practitioners in a Rising Asia

Friday, October 16, 2015, 12:15pm

S153, 1st Floor, CGIS South, 1730 Cambridge St., Cambridge, MA

Kenneth Winston, Visiting Scholar, Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, Harvard Kennedy School

Many Asian countries are in transition, as they struggle to meet the demands of a global world.  This struggle is not only economic and political; it is moral.  Simply put, it is a struggle to preserve what one believes to be of value in one’s own culture or tradition while responding to new circumstances and participating in new relationships.  Thus, it often involves a hybrid of traditional beliefs and transplanted values, which makes Asian countries fascinating sites for the study of political and ethical development.  In particular, emerging democratic aspirations and increasing commitment to standards of professionalism are constituent elements of the new moral environment in Asia.  As a result, the ethical challenges faced by practitioners have a special urgency and demand close attention.  This talk presents a general framework for thinking about these challenges, focusing on the kinds of moral competence professionals require in working for the good of others.

October 2, 2015 Posted by | China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Comparative Political Theory, Ethical Theory, Lecture | one comment

Upcoming Lecture in Taiwan

An interesting-sounding lecture that touches on the possible “new life” to be found in the Neo-Confucian compendium, Reflections on Things at Hand; June 18th at Taiwan Normal University:

「當代與東亞儒家市民論壇」
講 題:朱熹、呂祖謙合編「近思錄」的古意和新生
主講人:朱浤源教授 (中央研究院 近代史研究所)、呂榮海律師 (蔚理法律事務所)
主持人:潘朝陽教授 (國立臺灣師範大學 東亞學系)
時 間:民國一0四年六月十八日(週四)晚上七點至九點
地 點:臺師大誠大樓九樓 政治學研究所多功能會議室

June 17, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Lecture, Neo-Confucianism, Politics | no comments

Events next week in Hong Kong

As I have already mentioned, on Friday May 15, there will be an all-day symposium on Joseph Chan’s book Confucian Perfectionism at HKU. There are at least two other Chinese-philosophy related events taking place next week in Hong Kong (please let me know if you know of others!):

  • On Thursday May 14, David Wong (Duke University) will be speaking on “Moral Beauty” at HKU (Room 966, 9/F, The Jockey Club Tower) at 4:30pm.
  • On Wednesday May 13, I will be speaking on “Varieties of Knowing in Neo-Confucianism” at the Center for East Asian and Comparative Philosophy, HK City University (Conference Room 1, To Yuen Building), 4:00pm.

May 5, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Hong Kong, Lecture | no comments

Lecture at Yale tomorrow

Wednesday, April 29, 2015
12:00 PM to 1:30 PM

The Seduction of Daoist Philosophy: What Was Lost on the Way to Understanding the Daoist Religion?

Room 202, Luce Hall, 34 Hillhouse Avenue

James Robson – Professor, Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University

Continue reading “Lecture at Yale tomorrow”

April 28, 2015 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Daodejing, Daoism, Lecture | no comments

David Elstein – Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy Lecture: “The Possibility of a Confucian Doctrine of Free Expression”, Mar. 27 @5:30pm

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes: DAVID ELSTEIN (SUNY New Paltz)
With responses from: WARREN FRISINA (Hofstra University)

Please join at Columbia University’s Religion Department on FRIDAY, MARCH 27 5:30PM for his lecture entitled:

The Possibility of a Confucian Doctrine of Free Expression

ABSTRACT: Most contemporary New Confucian advocates for democracy take a robust right of free expression for granted as a necessary condition for democratic practice. Yet whether or how Confucianism can justify such a right is often passed over without much analysis. On the face of it, the case does not look good. Classical Confucians of course do not mention any such right, and what they do say is generally neutral or outright hostile to free expression. Various limitations on free expression have also been endorsed by later Confucians, including some contemporary thinkers. The usual liberal justifications of free expression as protecting individual autonomy and preserving access to truth probably will not work for Confucians. For one thing, autonomy is not valued in the same way as in liberalism. Second, Confucians have generally been confident that truth and falsehood can be reliably distinguished by the more enlightened and there is not much to be gained by allowing the persistence of obviously false doctrines. The bigger concern is the harm false doctrines can cause. In this paper I will examine Confucian opposition to free expression, where Confucians will disagree with liberal views, and consider whether Confucianism can justify free expression along with how the Confucian right may differ in application. Continue reading “David Elstein – Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy Lecture: “The Possibility of a Confucian Doctrine of Free Expression”, Mar. 27 @5:30pm”

March 10, 2015 Posted by | Comparative philosophy, Confucianism, Lecture | 7 comments

Berge-Becker at Columbia Neo-Confucianism Seminar

The next session of the Columbia University Seminar on Neo-Confucian Studies will convene Friday, November 7 from 3:30 to 5:30pm in the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University.

Zach Berge-Becker of Columbia University will present the paper “Imagined Seclusion: The Construction of Su Shi’s (1037-1101) Literary Persona at Huangzhou.”  A copy of the paper can be obtained by contacting the organizers.
All are welcome to attend.   Please join us after the seminar for dinner at a location to be announced.

Continue reading “Berge-Becker at Columbia Neo-Confucianism Seminar”

November 4, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Lecture, Neo-Confucianism | no comments

Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy lecture by Jake Davis: “‘The scope for Wisdom’: Early Buddhism on Reasons and Persons”, Friday October 24 @5:30pm

 

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes: JAKE DAVIS (CUNY Graduate Center)
With responses from: CHARLES GOODMAN (SUNY Binghamton)

Please join at Columbia University’s Religion Department on FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24 at 5:30PM for his lecture entitled:

“‘The scope for Wisdom: Early Buddhism on Reasons and Persons
ABSTRACT: The idea that meditation leads to the realization that there is no self, and that this realization motivates selfless action for the welfare of all beings, is widely understood to be a central feature of Buddhist doctrine. Continue reading “Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy lecture by Jake Davis: “‘The scope for Wisdom’: Early Buddhism on Reasons and Persons”, Friday October 24 @5:30pm”

October 7, 2014 Posted by | Buddhism, Lecture | no comments

Angle lecture: “Neo-Confucian ‘Civil Society’?”

I will be in London next week, and among other things, giving a talk at LSE in the Political Philosophy Seminar series on Tuesday, 24 June at 4pm, in the Old Building, Graham Wallas Room (5th floor; ask for directions at reception). The title is “Neo Confucian ‘Civil Society’?” It’s open to all; please come by if you are interested!

June 20, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Comparative Political Theory, Lecture, Neo-Confucianism | 2 comments

Lecture tomorrow at Oxford

Reminder of the following paper to be delivered at the Interdisciplinary Workshop for Manuscript and Text Culture (WMTC) at The Queen’s College, University of Oxford

Please note the change of rooms.

Wednesday 11 June: Maria Khayutina (Munich University): Writing Agents in Early China (ca. 11-8 cc BCE): Secretaries and Makers of Slabs

Continue reading “Lecture tomorrow at Oxford”

June 10, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Lecture | no comments

Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy lecture by Ted Slingerland: “Trying Not to Try: Cooperation, Trust, and the Paradox of Spontaneity” on Friday, May 9 @5:30pm

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes: EDWARD SLINGERLAND (University of British Columbia)

With responses from: MICHAEL BROWNSTEIN (New Jersey Institute of Technology)

Please join us at Columbia University’s Religion department on Friday, May 9, 2014 at 5:30PM for his lecture called:

“Trying Not to Try: Cooperation, Trust, and the Paradox of Spontaneity”

Abstract: Many early Chinese thinkers had as their spiritual ideal the state of wu-wei, or effortless action.  Continue reading “Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy lecture by Ted Slingerland: “Trying Not to Try: Cooperation, Trust, and the Paradox of Spontaneity” on Friday, May 9 @5:30pm”

April 15, 2014 Posted by | Comparative philosophy, Confucianism, Daoism, Lecture | no comments

Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy lecture by Joseph Chan: “Confucianism and Democracy: Uneasy Marriage or Productive Partnership?” on Friday, April 18th @5:30pm

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY
 
Welcomes: JOSEPH CHAN (University of Hong Kong)
With responses from: WARREN FRISINA (Hofstra University)
 
Please join us on Friday, April 18 at 5:30PM for his lecture entitled:
 
“Confucianism and Democracy: Uneasy Marriage or Productive Partnership?”
 
Abstract: Since the very beginning, Confucianism has been troubled by a serious gap between its political ideals and the reality of societal circumstances. Continue reading “Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy lecture by Joseph Chan: “Confucianism and Democracy: Uneasy Marriage or Productive Partnership?” on Friday, April 18th @5:30pm”

April 1, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Confucianism, Contemporary Confucianism, Lecture, Political Theory | one comment

Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy lecture on “Śāstravid: A New Electronic Research Tool for Studying Indian Philosophical Texts” THIS FRIDAY March 28th @5:30pm

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY
and
THE COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF RELIGION
welcome:

 JAN WESTERHOFF (University of Oxford)

Please join us on
Friday, March 28 at 5:30PM 

Continue reading “Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy lecture on “Śāstravid: A New Electronic Research Tool for Studying Indian Philosophical Texts” THIS FRIDAY March 28th @5:30pm”

March 26, 2014 Posted by | Indian Philosophy, Lecture | no comments

Joseph Chan Lecture at Harvard

Friday, April 4, 2:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Political Authority and Democracy: A Contemporary Confucian Perspective
Joseph Chan, Professor, Department of Politics and Public Administration, University of Hong Kong
Harvard Law School, The Morgan Courtroom, Austin Hall Room 308
Sponsored by East Asian Legal Studies, HLS

March 23, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative Political Theory, Confucianism, Contemporary Confucianism, Democracy, Lecture, Politics | no comments

Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy lecture on causation in Madhyamaka philosophy THIS FRIDAY March 7th @5:30pm

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes: MARK SIDERITS (Seoul National University)

Please join us at Columbia University’s Religion department on Friday, March 7, 2014 at 5:30pm for his lecture called:

Causation, ‘Humean’ Causation and Emptiness

ABSTRACT: Continue reading “Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy lecture on causation in Madhyamaka philosophy THIS FRIDAY March 7th @5:30pm”

March 5, 2014 Posted by | Buddhism, Comparative philosophy, Lecture | no comments

Slingerland at Harvard this Monday

Monday, February 3, 4:00 p.m.

Fairbank Center China Humanities Seminar

Chinese Studies in the Age of Consilience: New Approaches Drawn from the Cognitive and Evolutionary Sciences

Edward Slingerland, University of British Columbia

Cosponsored with the Mahindra Humanities Center and the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University

http://fairbank.fas.harvard.edu/event/edward-slingerland

CGIS South, Doris and Ted Lee Gathering Room (S030), 1730 Cambridge Street, Harvard University

January 31, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Lecture | no comments

Ivanhoe Lecture at Rutgers

P. J. Ivanhoe will speak at Rutgers on Feb. 6; the title is “Senses and Values of Oneness.” More informaton is here.

January 27, 2014 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Lecture | one comment

Reminder: Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy lecture on Truth and Argument in Ancient Chinese Philosophy Dec 6 @5:30pm

(A reminder about this upcoming lecture this Friday, December 6.)

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes:

BRYAN VAN NORDEN (Vassar College)

With responses from:

TIMOTHY CONNOLLY (East Stroudsburg University)

Please join us at Columbia University’s Religion department on Friday, December 6, 2013 at 5:30 for his lecture called:

“Truth and Argument in Ancient Chinese Philosophy”

ABSTRACT:

Most informed students of comparative Chinese-Western philosophy would agree with the following four claims: 

  1. Chinese philosophy is almost always concerned with truths that have ethical and social implications, whereas Western philosophy is sometimes concerned with purely theoretical puzzle-solving.
  2. Nonetheless, historically speaking, most Western philosophers have in fact been motivated to philosophize by ethical and social concerns.  The trend toward theoretical puzzle-solving is largely characteristic of some 20th century philosophy, particularly in the English-speaking world.
  3. Aristotle invented the first form of formal, deductive logic in the West, whereas Chinese philosophers were much more interested in the complexities of ordinary language arguments.
  4. Nonetheless, philosophers in both China and the West give philosophical arguments – and sometimes structurally similar philosophical arguments – without needing to use formal logic.

Controversy remains, though, over the proper way to understand the role of “truth” in Chinese philosophy. Continue reading “Reminder: Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy lecture on Truth and Argument in Ancient Chinese Philosophy Dec 6 @5:30pm”

December 4, 2013 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Lecture | no comments

Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy lecture on Truth and Argument in Ancient Chinese Philosophy Dec 6 @5:30pm

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes:

BRYAN VAN NORDEN (Vassar College)

With responses from:

TIMOTHY CONNOLLY (East Stroudsburg University)

Please join us at Columbia University’s Religion department on Friday, December 6, 2013 at 5:30 for his lecture called:

“Truth and Argument in Ancient Chinese Philosophy”

ABSTRACT:

Most informed students of comparative Chinese-Western philosophy would agree with the following four claims:  Continue reading “Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy lecture on Truth and Argument in Ancient Chinese Philosophy Dec 6 @5:30pm”

November 18, 2013 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Lecture | 10 comments

Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy lecture on meditation and the mind sciences this Thursday

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY SEMINAR ON COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Invites you to attend an upcoming event at PRINCETON UNIVERSITY hosted by the PRINCETON BUDDHIST STUDIES WORKSHOP

Welcoming: GEORGES DREYFUS (Williams College)

Please join us at Princeton University’s 1879 Hall, Room 137, on Thursday, November 14th, for his lecture called:  “Taking Meditation Seriously (But Not Too Much)”

ABSTRACT: Continue reading “Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy lecture on meditation and the mind sciences this Thursday”

November 13, 2013 Posted by | Buddhism, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Lecture, Philosophy of Mind | no comments

Upcoming SOAS Lecture and Workshop on Comparative Political Theory

Two events at SOAS this week, both celebrating the launch of a new MSc program in Comparative Political Thought:

Continue reading “Upcoming SOAS Lecture and Workshop on Comparative Political Theory”

June 10, 2013 Posted by | Comparative philosophy, Comparative Political Theory, Conference, Lecture | no comments

A Busy Week at Fudan University

In addition to the lectures by Kurtis Hagen on Xunzi that I just posted about, there are several other events taking place over the next week at Shanghai’s Fudan University. In chronological order:

Friday May 24, 10:00am, P. J. Ivanhoe (Chair Professor of East Asian Philosophy and Religion, City University of Hong Kong) is speaking on “Kongzi and Aristotle as Virtue Ethicists.” Details are here.

Friday May 24, 6:30pm, P. J. Ivanhoe is delivering the first lecture of a series on “Chinese Research on Confucianism in Global Perspective”; Prof. Ivanhoe’s lecture is titled “Confucian Cosmopolitanism.” Details on this and the subsequent lectures in the series are here.

Saturday and Sunday, May 24-25, an international conference on the topic “Chinese Research on Confucianism in Global Perspective” will take place; details on all speakers and titles are here.

Tuesday May 28, 10:00am, I am speaking on the topic “Progressive Confucianism on Social Criticism and the Values of Deference.” Details are here.

I hope that blog readers lucky enough to be in Shanghai will be able to enjoy some of these lectures!

May 22, 2013 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Conference, Confucianism, Contemporary Confucianism, Lecture | no comments

Hagen Gives Lecture Series on Xunzi at Fudan

Kurtis Hagen of SUNY Plattsburgh will be delivering three lectures on Xunzi, all from 10:00am-11:30am, on May 27, 29, and 30, at Fudan University in Shanghai. Details follow!

Continue reading “Hagen Gives Lecture Series on Xunzi at Fudan”

May 22, 2013 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Confucianism, Lecture, Xunzi | no comments

Tu Weiming Lecture at Harvard

Tuesday, May 7, 12:30 p.m.

Cultural China Reexamined: The Question of Identity

Tu Weiming, Director, Institute for Advanced Humanistic Studies, Peking University; Senior Fellow, Harvard University Asia Center

Chaired by Prof. Elizabeth Perry, Dept. of Government, Harvard University; Director, Harvard-Yenching Institute
Sponsored by the Harvard-Yenching Institute and the Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard
Common Room, 2 Divinity Ave., Cambridge

May 4, 2013 Posted by | Lecture | one comment

This Week’s Neo-Confucianism Seminar at Columbia

The next session of the Columbia University Seminar on Neo-Confucian Studies will convene on Friday, May 3, 2013, from 3:30 to 5:30pm.  We will meet in the Board Room of the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University.  Please note the earlier starting time.

Our presenters for this session (listed here in alphabetical order) are Agnes Chalier and Tom Selover.  Dr. Chalier’s paper is titled “Scientific Variations: Research on History and Philosophy of Science in Europe and China.”  A copy of her paper is attached (actually, if you’re reading this on-line, contact one of the organizers for a copy).  Dr. Selover’s paper is titled “Neo-Confucian Principle(s) in the Thought of Sun Myung Moon (1920-2012).”   His paper will be distributed as soon as it is available.

Continue reading “This Week’s Neo-Confucianism Seminar at Columbia”

April 30, 2013 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Lecture, Neo-Confucianism, Science | no comments

Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy lecture on Free Will in Indian Philosophy TOMORROW April 26 @5:30pm

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes JOERG TUSKE,  Department of Philosophy, Salisbury University

With responses from David Nowakowski , Department of Philosophy, Princeton University

Please join us at Columbia University Department of Religion on March 22, 2013 at 5:30pm for his lecture entitled

Free Will in Indian Philosophy

ABSTRACT: Recent discussions of free will in Indian Philosophy have mainly focused on the problem in the context of Buddhist Philosophy. Buddhist philosophers reject the existence of the self and the question is whether they also reject the existence of free will. The answers to this question vary from philosophers who claim that Buddhists have to be determinists to philosophers who argue for some form of compatibilism with regards to Buddhist Philosophy. In my talk I will focus on free will in at least one of the non-Buddhist schools of Indian philosophy, the Navya-Nyāya school. I will argue that while the philosophers of this school believed in the existence of a self, it would not be accurate to label them with one of the Western positions on free will. In fact the whole concept of free will is problematic in the context of Indian philosophy. This also has consequences for the Buddhist positions and how we classify them. Continue reading “Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy lecture on Free Will in Indian Philosophy TOMORROW April 26 @5:30pm”

April 25, 2013 Posted by | Indian Philosophy, Lecture | no comments

Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy lecture on Confucian and Daoist views of agency April 12 @5:45pm

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes intrepid Warper & Wefter MANYUL IM,  Department of Philosophy, Fairfield University

With responses from Michael Brownstein, Department of Philosophy, New Jersey Institute of Technology

Please join us at Columbia University Department of Religion on April 12, 2013 at 5:45pm for his lecture entitled

Spontaneity, Deliberation, and Valuing in Early China

ABSTRACT: Continue reading “Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy lecture on Confucian and Daoist views of agency April 12 @5:45pm”

April 6, 2013 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Confucianism, Daoism, Lecture | no comments

Next Columbia Neo-Confucianism Seminar

The next session of the Columbia University Seminar on Neo-Confucian Studies will convene on Friday, April 12 (the second Friday of the month, a departure from our usual first-Friday format), from 3:30 to 5:30pm. We will meet in the Komoda Room in the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University.

We will have two presenters for this session (listed here in alphabetical order).

  • Theresa Kelleher of Manhattanville College will present the paper “Looking at the Quotidian Dimensions of Neo-Confucianism: Excerpts from the Journal of Wu Yubi (1392-1469).”
  • Zhou Zehao of York College will present the paper “Confucius and the Cultural Revolution: A Brief Comparison of the Two Anti-Confucian Campaigns during the Cultural Revolution.”

Copies of their papers will be distributed soon. All are welcome to attend. Please feel free to forward this message to interested colleagues. Please join us after the seminar for dinner at the Columbia Cottage restaurant, which is located on the corner of Amsterdam and 111th Streets.

April 5, 2013 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Confucius, Lecture, Neo-Confucianism | no comments

Opportunity to Participate in 2013 Reischauer Lectures

CALL FOR PARTICIPATION—2013 EDWIN O. REISCHAUER LECTURES
The 2013 Edwin O. Reischauer Lectures will take place at Harvard on April 10, 11, and 12, featuring Shigehisa Kuriyama, Reischauer Institute Professor of Cultural History, presenting three lectures on the topic “Toward an Archaeology of Distraction.” On April 10 the theme will be “What Truly Matters?”; on April 11, “Curiosity and Distraction”; and on April 12, “Playful Science.” The public is invited to submit their thoughts on five preview elements for each lecture.
For more information, go to: http://fairbank.fas.harvard.edu/event/2013-reischauer-lectures
See also the call for participation: http://fairbank.fas.harvard.edu/call-participation2013-reischauer-lectures-kuriyama

March 29, 2013 Posted by | Comparative philosophy, Lecture | no comments

Karen Turner Lecture at Harvard next Friday

Friday, April 5, 2013, 12:00 p.m.
Harvard East Asian Legal Studies Seminar
Weber’s Distortions of Chinese Law and Religion: A Reassessment of a Lasting Legacy
Karen Turner, Professor of History, College of the Holy Cross
The Morgan Courtroom, Austin Hall Room 308

March 29, 2013 Posted by | Comparative philosophy, Law, Lecture, Religion | no comments