Category Archives: Lecture

Paul Goldin – Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy Lecture: “THE IMMORTAL SPIRIT IN CLASSICAL CHINESE AESTHETICS” Friday Dec 6

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes: PAUL GOLDIN (University of Pennsylvania)
With responses from: SANDRA SHAPSHAY (Hunter College, CUNY)

Please join on December 6, 2019 at 5:30 for his lecture entitled:
The Immortal Spirit in Classical Chinese Aesthetics

ABSTRACT: This will be the third (and, time permitting, some material from the fourth) of a series of lectures that I aim to write up formally as a book.  We will begin with a brief review of the most familiar theory of Chinese aesthetics: works of art are the products of sensitive human beings who cannot suppress their sincere responses to emotional stimuli.  If art is understood as a sincere statement of this kind by a great genius, it stands to reason that, by correctly interpreting the work, one can communicate with that genius’s mind (xin 心) even after his or her death–and, likewise, that an artist today can communicate with audiences yet unborn.  Continue reading →

KIM Sungmoon – Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy Lecture: “BEYOND THE PLURALISM DILEMMA — A CONSTITUTIONAL RECONSTRUCTION OF CONFUCIAN DEMOCRACY” Friday Nov 8

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes: KIM SUNGMOON (City University of Hong Kong)
With responses from: OMAR DAHBOUR  (Hunter College & Graduate Center, CUNY)

Please join on November 8, 2019 at 5:30 for his lecture entitled,

BEYOND THE PLURALISM DILEMMA — A CONSTITUTIONAL RECONSTRUCTION OF CONFUCIAN DEMOCRACY

Recently, a group of scholars has challenged the moral legitimacy of Confucian democracy from a liberal philosophical standpoint. Continue reading →

Richard Kim – Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy Lecture: “THE ROLE OF NEGATIVE EMOTIONS IN THE GOOD LIFE: REFLECTIONS FROM THE ZHUANGZI” Friday October 11 at 5:30pm

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes: RICHARD KIM (Loyola University Chicago)
With responses from: CHRISTOPHER GOWANS  (Fordham University)

Please join on October 11, 2019 at 5:30 for his lecture entitled,

THE ROLE OF NEGATIVE EMOTIONS IN THE GOOD LIFE: REFLECTIONS FROM THE ZHUANGZI

ABSTRACT: The philosophical and psychological literature on well-being tend to focus on the prudential value of positive emotions such as pleasure, joy, or gratitude. But how do the negative emotions such as grief fit into our understanding of well-being? It is often assumed that negative emotions are intrinsically bad far us and that we should work toward eliminating them, especially from the perspective of our own well-being. Continue reading →

Ivanhoe Lecture at HKBU on Interpretive Strategies

HKBU Arts Does Method Colloquium Series

Title: Interpretive Strategies: The Case of Classical Chinese Texts

Speaker :     Philip J. Ivanhoe (Distinguished Chair Professor, Sungkyunkwan University)

Date :     20 September 2019 (Fri)

Time :       2:00 – 4:00pm

Venue :     University Chapel(大學禮拜堂), Ho Sin Hang Campus, Hong Kong Baptist University

Further details can be found at:  https://hkbuhk.ca1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_9mhn3A1sGcwEveR

CEACOP Monthly Talk by Eirik Lang Harris

Title: A Han Feizian Worry with Confucian Meritocracy – and a Non-Moral Alternative

Speaker: Eirik Lang Harris (Hong Kong Baptist University)

Date: 27 September 2019 (Friday)

Time: 16:00 – 17:30

Venue: Center for East Asian and Comparative Philosophy (Room 4433, Mong Man Wai Building)

For detailed information, please see the event flyer here.

SICEP Talk by Michael Lackner, Monday, September 9

Sungkyun Institute for Confucian Studies and East Asian Philosophy (SICEP) will be hosting a talk by Michael Lackner (Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg) titled, “Can fate be changed? Views on fate and fate calculation in traditional China”

The talk will be hosted at Sungkyunkwan University’s International Hall 9B106 on Monday, September 9 at 4-6 PM.

For further details, please see here for the poster and the webpage.

Direction to SKKU’s International Hall: https://summer.skku.edu/summer/life/transportation.do

Kalmanson Lecture at CSCP: “So You Want to Diversify Philosophy”

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes:

Leah Kalmanson (Drake University)

With a response from:

Andrew Lambert (College of Staten Island, CUNY)

Please join on us at Columbia University’s Religion Department on FRIDAY, April 26th at 6:00 PM for her lecture entitled:

So You Want to Diversify Philosophy: Some Thoughts on Structural Change

Continue reading →

Lecture by Roger Ames this coming Friday March 15 at the New School (New York)

Roger T. Ames 安樂哲 on
“Deweyan and Confucian Ethics: A Challenge to the Ideology of Individualism”

FRIDAY, MARCH 15, 2019 AT 4:00 PM to 6:00 PM
Wolff Conference Room, Room D1103, Albert and Vera List Academic Center
6 East 16th Street, New York, NY 10003

Click here for more info (includes a link to register to attend)

ABSTRACT: John Dewey, in his resistance to foundational individualism, declares that individual autonomy so conceived is a fiction; for Dewey, it is association that is a fact. In his own language: Continue reading →

Edward Slingerland – Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy Lecture: “Body and Mind in Early China: Embodied Cognition, Digital Humanities, and the Project of Comparative Philosophy” Friday Mar 8 at 5:30pm

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes: Edward Slingerland (University of British Columbia)

With a response from: Paul Goldin (University of Pennsylvania)

Please join on us at Columbia University’s Religion Department on FRIDAY, March 8th at 5:30 PM for his lecture entitled:

Body and Mind in Early China: Embodied Cognition, Digital Humanities, and the Project of Comparative Philosophy

ABSTRACT: It is commonly claimed that mind-body dualism is entirely foreign to China—or “the East” more generally. This talk will explore how engaging with the cognitive sciences and digital humanities undermines claims such as this, and more broadly can help us to do our work as scholars of comparative philosophy. Continue reading →