Category Archives: Lecture

Kalmanson Lecture at CSCP: “So You Want to Diversify Philosophy”

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes:

Leah Kalmanson (Drake University)

With a response from:

Andrew Lambert (College of Staten Island, CUNY)

Please join on us at Columbia University’s Religion Department on FRIDAY, April 26th at 6:00 PM for her lecture entitled:

So You Want to Diversify Philosophy: Some Thoughts on Structural Change

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Lecture by Roger Ames this coming Friday March 15 at the New School (New York)

Roger T. Ames 安樂哲 on
“Deweyan and Confucian Ethics: A Challenge to the Ideology of Individualism”

FRIDAY, MARCH 15, 2019 AT 4:00 PM to 6:00 PM
Wolff Conference Room, Room D1103, Albert and Vera List Academic Center
6 East 16th Street, New York, NY 10003

Click here for more info (includes a link to register to attend)

ABSTRACT: John Dewey, in his resistance to foundational individualism, declares that individual autonomy so conceived is a fiction; for Dewey, it is association that is a fact. In his own language: Continue reading →

Edward Slingerland – Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy Lecture: “Body and Mind in Early China: Embodied Cognition, Digital Humanities, and the Project of Comparative Philosophy” Friday Mar 8 at 5:30pm

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes: Edward Slingerland (University of British Columbia)

With a response from: Paul Goldin (University of Pennsylvania)

Please join on us at Columbia University’s Religion Department on FRIDAY, March 8th at 5:30 PM for his lecture entitled:

Body and Mind in Early China: Embodied Cognition, Digital Humanities, and the Project of Comparative Philosophy

ABSTRACT: It is commonly claimed that mind-body dualism is entirely foreign to China—or “the East” more generally. This talk will explore how engaging with the cognitive sciences and digital humanities undermines claims such as this, and more broadly can help us to do our work as scholars of comparative philosophy. Continue reading →

Lo on Military Ethics at CEACOP

Title:               Just Cause in Early China: A Comparative Analysis of Warfare Ethics

Speaker:         Professor Ping-cheung Lo

Date:              14 February 2019 (Thursday)

Time:             16:00-17:30

Venue:           Center for East Asian and Comparative Philosophy (Room 4433, Mong Man Wai Building)

More details here.

Erica Brindley – Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy Lecture: “Spontaneous Arising and an Ethics of Creativity in Early Daoism” Friday Nov 2 at 5:30pm

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes: Erica Brindley (Penn State University)
With a response from: Christopher Gowans (Fordham University)

Please join on us at Columbia University’s Religion Department on FRIDAY, November 2nd at 5:30 PM for her lecture entitled:

Spontaneous Arising and an Ethics of Creativity in Early Daoism

ABSTRACT: In the early part of the 20th century, Joseph Needham formulated a substantial claim concerning the Chinese predilection for self-generated creation rather than creator gods and myths. Half a century later, scholars working in the West like Frederick Mote, Derk Bodde, and Chang Kwang-chih picked up on Needham’s insight to discuss the so-called lack of a “creation myth” in early Chinese culture, basing their arguments on what they called the “inner necessity” or “spontaneously self-generating” nature of things in the cosmos. While the claim that there are no creator gods or myths in early China is false and has since been convincingly refuted by many scholars, there may indeed be a way in which Bodde and company were onto something. In this talk, I will show how the notions of “inner necessity” and “spontaneity” are close but not the best fit for understanding certain early Chinese accounts of creation and the creative process. Continue reading →

Eske Møllgaard – Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy Lecture: “How I Came to Conclude that Confucian Discourse is not Philosophy” Friday Oct 12 at 5:30pm

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes: Eske Møllgaard  (University of Rhose Island)
With responses from: Andrew Lambert (College of Staten Island, CUNY)

Please join us at Columbia University’s Religion Department on FRIDAY, October 12th at 5:30 PM for his lecture entitled:

How I Came to Conclude that Confucian Discourse is not Philosophy

ABSTRACT: The paper follows and elaborates on a line of argument in my book The Confucian Political Imagination, which was published by Palgrave Macmillan this summer. I do not address the main argument of the book, but sum up a line of thought that has gradually taken form since I began to read Confucian texts. I explain what I learned about reading Confucianism from my teacher Tu Weiming, and why I could not follow the philosophical turn in American Confucian studies. I point to the importance of reading in an emphatic sense, and argue that the philosophical approaches to Confucian texts often leads to an impoverished reading of these texts. Then I provide my own suggestions towards a definition Confucian discourse. I briefly point to the historical reasons Confucian discourse is not philosophy, and finally I ask if all this really matters.

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Harvard lecture on Suicide and Confucian Eldercare

Wednesday, September 19, 2018, 4:00 p.m.
IN SEARCH OF A BENEVOLENT POLITY: ELDERLY SUICIDE IN CHINA AND A CONFUCIAN SOCIO-ETHICAL VISION OF ELDERCARE
Professor Jing-Bao Nie, University of Otago, New Zealand
Chair: Professor Arthur Kleinman, Esther and Sidney Rabb Professor of Anthropology, Harvard University; Professor of Medical Anthropology and Professor of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School
S153, 1st Floor, CGIS South, 1730 Cambridge St., Cambridge
Asia Center Seminar Series; co-sponsored by the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies