Category Archives: Politics

New episodes of The Issue is Not The Issue

The Issue is Not the Issue: A Podcast with Hans-Georg Moeller and Dan Sarafinas

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfs0MY7rs8J6jWlCdneoPVQ

 

Hans-Georg Moeller and Dan Sarafinas discuss contemporary debates on “political correctness” and related moral and social issues. They point to concepts such as virtue speech (“virtue signalling”), civil religion, “profilicity,” and the role of critique to better understand their nature.

 

Episode 3—Critique:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3W1m0Bez8vU

Philosophy today runs the risk of once more becoming the “handmaiden of theology” by being put in the service of civil religion. The Kantian concept of critique is revived to reflect on contemporary dogmatism and associated power structures that lead to phenomena such as “competitive wokeness” in entertainment (Taylor Swift) or the need to write “diversity statements” in academia. The idea of a therapeutic rather than a normative philosophy is suggested and it is explained how society, along with critique, evolves rather than progresses.

 

Episode 4—Profilicity: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Yz1C0-mtWI

Why do we need to produce “virtue speech”? We need it to be competitive in society and to bolster our public profiles. A new profile-based identity paradigm, called “profilicity,” is on the rise. It is replacing other identity paradigms such as sincerity and authenticity and provides not only individuals but also institutions (political parties, companies, universities, etc.) with identity value.

The Issue is Not the Issue: A Podcast with Hans-Georg Moeller and Dan Sarafinas

Hans-Georg Moeller and Dan Sarafinas discuss contemporary debates on “political correctness” and related moral and social issues. They point to concepts such as virtue speech (“virtue signalling”), civil religion, and the role of critique to better understand their nature.

Episode 1–Virtue Speech: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3pg8H-b87Cs;

The phenomenon of virtue speech (“virtue signalling”) has become a central feature in recent outrage movements pervasive throughout the West. Virtue speech, which is implicitly tied to accusations of hate speech, is a form of moralistic discourse setting speech examples that make it difficult to openly discuss elements of our culture without falling into the trap of moralizing.

Episode 2–Civil Religion: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5EDEuXCPHOQ

Civil religion plays a central role in the virtue speech, or political correctness, discourse. The history of the concept is discussed as well as the structure of the American form of civil religion and how tenets of civil religion are constantly being performed and re-enacted, particularly in current social media outrage movements.

 

CFP: Political Pluralism in Greater China – 大中华的政治多元化

Here is a call for papers for a workshop on “Political Pluralism in Greater China – 大中华的政治多元化,” to be held in July 2019 at the University of Lucerne, organized by Philipp Renninger (Lucerne) and Ewan Smith (Oxford).

Three articles on contemporary Chinese political thinking

Three significant articles, all open access, on contemporary Chinese political thinking.

“Research dialogues on the intellectual public sphere in China (Part I),” Guest edited by Timothy Cheek, David Ownby, and Joshua Fogel. China Information Volume 32, Issue 1, March 2018

Mapping the intellectual public sphere in China today

Timothy CheekDavid OwnbyJoshua Fogel

First Published March 14, 2018; pp. 107–120

Liberalism in contemporary China: Questions, strategies, directions

Tang XiaobingMark McConaghy

First Published January 2, 2018; pp. 121–138

The recasting of Chinese socialism: The Chinese New Left since 2000

Shi AnshuFrançois LachapelleMatthew Galway

First Published March 14, 2018; pp. 139–159

“Future of Confucian Political Philosophy” Published

I’d like to call out one item in the recently-published issue of Comparative Philosophy for special mention. “The Future of Confucian Political Philosophy” is a 22,000 word edited transcript of a roundtable discussion that was held in Hong Kong in February 2017. (Direct link to the transcript is here.) The main speakers are:

  • Stephen C. ANGLE, Wesleyan University
  • Elton CHAN, Yale-NUS College
  • Joseph CHAN, University of Hong Kong
  • Jiwei CI, University of Hong Kong
  • Ruiping FAN, City University of Hong Kong
  • Yong HUANG, Chinese University of Hong Kong
  • Yi-Huah JIANG, City University of Hong Kong
  • Sungmoon KIM, City University of Hong Kong

We each make presentations, and then there is ample time for discussion, both among the invited speakers and with other attendees. On behalf of all participants, I hope that readers will find this to be an engaging snapshot of the some of the state of the art — and some glimpses of the future — of Confucian political philosophy. Discussion here of its themes is of course encouraged!