Warp, Weft, and Way

Chinese and Comparative Philosophy 中國哲學與比較哲學

2017-18 PGR / Chinese Philosophy Rankings

The 2017-18 Philosophical Gourmet Report (PGR) has been released here. It includes “specialty rankings” for various areas, including Chinese philosophy. This year, for the first time, I was invited to be among the evaluators, and after wrestling with this a bit, decided to give it a try. As explained at the top of this page, evaluators see lists of faculty and then choose one of the following categories:

  • 0 – Inadequate for a PhD program
  • 1 – Marginal
  • 2 – Adequate
  • 3 – Good
  • 4 – Strong
  • 5 – Distinguished

Evaluators can do this for the program overall, and then for the various specialties. I chose to only rank the Chinese philosophy specialty (I did not select overall rankings). The vast majority I assigned a score of 0. I believe that the highest score I gave was a 3. Programs that have one or even two specialists can be — other things being equal — good places to study. But in my judgment there are no English-language programs that merit “strong” or “distinguished” rankings. In my view, that would take multiple specialists, and others with cognate interests, in the context of an overall strong and supportive department. We may get there one day, but we’re not there yet.

I have mixed views about this whole rankings thing, which has been discussed before on the blog. What we have tried to do here at Warp, Weft, and Way is provide as much objective information about graduate study as possible. But since PGR exists and I was invited to take part, I decided to give it a try.

One other thing. As Bryan Van Norden (another evaluator, and also someone on the Advisory Board) explains here, PGR policy is that programs need to have a certain minimum overall score in order to be ranked. Programs with significant “specialty” strengths but without the minimum overall score end up being listed as “Additional programs not evaluated this year but recommended for consideration by the Advisory Board.” I agree with Bryan’s sentiment that the programs listed under this rubric are as strong as the ones officially ranked, and thus disapprove of this policy, which I find to be highly misleading.

March 20, 2018 Posted by | Academia, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Graduate study, Profession | 27 comments

Valmisa Hired by Gettysburgh

Mercedes Valmisa wrote to share the following information; I’d be happy to pass on similar news that anyone else has to share. Congratulations, Mercedes!

I have accepted the position of Assistant Professor of Philosophy (tenure-track) at Gettysburg College’s Philosophy Department to begin in the fall 2018. For the 2018-2019 academic year, I will be an Andrew W. Mellon Faculty Fellow, a program intended to support faculty who can introduce diversity in the curriculum.

I got a B.A. in Philosophy from the University of Sevilla (Spain), a M.A. in Chinese Philosophy from National Taiwan University, and a Ph.D. in East Asian Studies (June 2017) from Princeton University. I’m both a sinologist and a philosopher, and I work at the intersection of Chinese Studies and Chinese Philosophy: using interdisciplinary methods and approaches to explore philosophical problems across the early corpus of Chinese texts, both received and excavated. I’m particularly interested in questions of agency, efficacy, uncertainty, control, and freedom.

January 4, 2018 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Profession | no comments

Olberding on Tien

Amy Olberding’s scathing critique of David Tien’s continued role in the field of Chinese philosophy.

December 9, 2017 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Gender, Profession | 35 comments

Overview of Jobs, 2017

Last year (2016) there was a sudden, dramatic increase in the number of tenure-track jobs aimed at least in part at Chinese, Asian, Non-Western, or Comparative Philosophy. Was it the beginning of a trend, or a blip? A review of this year’s offerings suggests that a real change may be taking place. I list here 20 positions that have been advertised for the current job season — approximately the same number as last year. I have included positions with Chinese, Asian, Non-Western, or Comparative in any AOS disjuncts — admittedly, in some of these cases, the job is not aimed narrowly at our field — and I have also included jobs with an Open AOS that further specifies some sort of interest in our field. I also include three interdisciplinary Asian or Chinese Studies positions that explicitly include philosophy. On the other hand, I have not included jobs with specific (i.e., non-Open) AOSes that include Chinese/Asian/Non-Western/Comparative as an AOC. The list is alphabetical. If I have missed any that should be included, or if you have any comments or corrections, please share!

(Note that this post is primarily for the purpose of reflection on the state of the field; the application deadlines for some of these jobs have already passed.)
Revision, 5 November 2017: This list is limited to English-language teaching positions, and as a result I have removed Wuhan University (which requires Mandarin, a fact Paul D’Ambrosio brought to my attention), and revised the number of total jobs to 18. See comments below for a reference to the Wuhan job and at least one other Mandarin-language job.
Revision, 14 November 2017: Added Washington College and revised total to 19.
Revision, 28 November 2017: Added Seton Hill University and revised total to 20.

Continue reading “Overview of Jobs, 2017”

November 2, 2017 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Job Opening, Profession | 9 comments

Univ. of Newcastle (Australia) to abolish Philosophy Major

Disturbing news from a colleague in Australia:

This is Yin Gao from the University of Newcastle, Australia. I have been teaching Chinese philosophy in this institution for over 15 years. I am afraid I have a rather bad news. My school decided to abolish philosophy major:
http://www.theherald.com.au/story/4905905/philosophy-classics-cuts-would-mark-uni-demise-union/
I wonder if you would announce the news here. My colleagues and I are dismayed by this decision. Currently, this proposed change is still under consultation. Any support from anyone would be much appreciated. They can send their comment to the following link:
Ruth.Hartmann@newcastle.edu.au or email me at my email as listed here.
UoN receive submission until Friday the 22nd of Sept [updated]. However, any comment after this date would still means a lot to us.

September 17, 2017 Posted by | Australia, Profession | one comment

WWWOPY Follow-Up: Please share your ideas

Some of you may remember that Hagop Sarkissian and I announced a while back a plan to acknowledge top papers on Chinese philosophy (journal articles and anthology chapters) via something we called the WWWOPY (Warp, Weft, and Way Outstanding Papers of the Year). Following the announced procedure, we wrote to a wide range of research-active colleagues (both junior and senior, and of various methodological and theoretical backgrounds) to solicit nominations. However, we received zero replies with nominations. So we are re-thinking our idea.

We subsequently wrote again to the same set of twenty-four colleagues, telling them what happened and asking (1) whether they thought this was a good idea, and (2) whether they had suggestions to make it work better. This time almost everyone replied, but there was little consensus. In reflecting on all the feedback, we did conclude that especially in a growing field with an increasing number of new voices, finding a way to call attention to particularly valuable, recent, article-length work still seems like a good idea. Many people told us that they did not keep regular tabs on this kind of new work, only digging in when they began a new project. But this means that too many people may be missing ideas that should prompt new or different kinds of research projects in the first place, among other consequences.

However we are a bit stymied about how to proceed, and so decided to open this topic up for general discussion. It is hard to find an approach that seems likely to be both useful and practical. Please share your thoughts!

June 10, 2017 Posted by | Articles of Interest, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Journal Related, Profession | 2 comments

Olberding: “Degenerate Skepticism and the Thieves of Philosophy”

Amy Olberding has published an essay called “Degenerate Skepticism and the Thieves of Philosophy” on the “Department of Deviance” website. She explains the essay’s origin:

An essay presented at a special APA session on what Chinese philosophy can contribute to contemporary philosophy. There are increasingly many sessions at APA meetings pitched to offer the non-specialist an entry into “non-western” philosophy. Rarely are these attended by anyone who is not already a specialist in “non-western” philosophy. The essay here is not about how Chinese philosophy can contribute to contemporary debate. It is instead a polemic about the folly of this question in the current atmosphere within the discipline.

March 23, 2017 Posted by | American Philosophical Association, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, philosophy canon, Profession | 6 comments

Chinese Philosophy to Return to Michigan

I am thrilled to be able to share the news that, thanks in part to a gift from Don and Ann Munro, the University of Michigan will be re-establishing a tenure-track line in Chinese philosophy, to be housed jointly in the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures and the Department of Philosophy. The support that the Munros have shown for the study of Chinese philosophy—in addition to Don’s distinguished career, the Munros have established the Tang Junyi Lecture Series at UM, the Munro Fund at the ACLS, and now this—is truly exemplary. Full text of the announcement follows.

Continue reading “Chinese Philosophy to Return to Michigan”

October 4, 2016 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Profession | 13 comments

Publishing on the History of Chinese Philosophy

The recent discussion of the scope of “philosophy” reminded me of Amy Olberding’s excellent idea that those of us with tenure, at least, should make a point of endeavoring to publish in “general” philosophy journals, at least some of the time. (Just to be clear: this is no criticsm of existing journals focused on Chinese or comparative philosophy!) I am finishing up an essay on how to understand (and translate) tian in the context of Neo-Confucianism, and thought that it might make sense to try submitting it to a general history of philosophy journal. Which to choose? I decided to do a little research. I was pretty sure that Brian Leiter’s blog would have some sort of ranking of such journals, and sure enough, it does (from 2010). What surprised me was what I found when I started looking at the journals’ websites.

Continue reading “Publishing on the History of Chinese Philosophy”

September 21, 2016 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Journal Related, Profession, Publishing | 13 comments

Another Round on Chinese Thought as Philosophy

In case you missed it, Nicholas Tampio recently published a short piece in Aeon explaining why he thinks Confucius (among other non-Western thinkers) should not be regarded as a philosopher, with implications for the philosophy curriculum and the makeup of philosophy faculties. This is a response to the recent New York Times piece by Jay Garfield and Bryan Van Norden.  Tampio and Van Norden subsequently exchanged tweets on the topic. Amy Olberding replies thoroughly and with humor here, and Ethan Mills responds on behalf of Indian philosophy here.

Where to begin?

Continue reading “Another Round on Chinese Thought as Philosophy”

September 20, 2016 Posted by | Academia, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, philosophy canon, Profession, Related Blog Discussions | 23 comments

Journal Rankings

I am not sure what exactly to make of this data, which is based on a ranking system that may make ore sense for the sciences than for the humanities, but here is the latest ranking of philosophy journals, based on rates of citation over the last three years. This certainly is not the only measure of journal quality, but perhaps something worth taking into account.

July 5, 2016 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Journal News, Journal Related, Profession | no comments

Wm. Theodore de Bary awarded the 2016 Tang Prize in Sinology

The University Committee on Asia & the Middle East (UCAME) is pleased to share the great news that the Tang Prize Committee, in a press conference from Taiwan earlier today, announced William Theodore de Bary, Professor Emeritus of Columbia University, the sole recipient of the 2016 Tang Prize in Sinology for his “pioneering contributions in Confucian studies.”  Founded in 2012 by Samuel Yin who was inspired by the Nobel Prize, the award includes a cash prize of US$1.24 million, as well as a separate grant of approx. US$311,000 for awardees in each of its four categories: Sinology, Sustainable Development, Biopharmaceutical Science, and Rule of Law.  The inaugural winner of the Tang Prize in 2014 was Prof. Yu Ying-shih.  This year’s award ceremony will take place in Taipei on September 25.

Continue reading “Wm. Theodore de Bary awarded the 2016 Tang Prize in Sinology”

June 20, 2016 Posted by | Neo-Confucianism, Profession | no comments

Behuniak on Van Norden on Chinese Philosophy

The following is a guest post by Jim Behuniak of Colby College. Please address any comments to Jim!

Van Norden on Chinese Philosophy in the U.S.

The recently concluded 11th East-West Philosopher’s Conference in Honolulu featured a number of sessions on the “place” of non-Western philosophy in the academy. Excellent presentations by Carine Defoort, Tao Jiang, Amy Olberding, Brian Bruya, and others, along with questions and discussion by Steve Angle, Roger Ames, Cheng Chung-ying and many others, brought the issue empirically and conceptually into focus over the ten days. This has me reflecting on Bryan Van Norden’s recent promotions of Chinese philosophy in the United States.

Continue reading “Behuniak on Van Norden on Chinese Philosophy”

June 1, 2016 Posted by | American Philosophical Association, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Profession | 33 comments

Department of Deviance Blog

Frustrated by many of the comments generated by recent calls for more openness in philosophy, Amy Olberding whipped up the “Department of Deviance” blog site. Enjoy!

June 1, 2016 Posted by | American Philosophical Association, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comedy, Comparative philosophy, Profession | no comments

Perkins to Hawaii

The search to replace Roger Ames, who is retiring from the University of Hawaii, has been completed with the hiring of Frank Perkins, currently Associate Professor of Philosophy at Nanyang Technological University. Frank will begin at Hawaii in January of 2017. Congratulations, Frank!

May 26, 2016 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Profession | no comments

****TO BROWSE MORE POSTS, PLEASE USE OUR SEARCH AND ARCHIVE MENUS****