Category Archives: Taiwan

CFP: Taiwanese Philosophy and the Preservation of Confucian Tradition

Call for papers: Taiwanese Philosophy and the Preservation of Confucian Tradition

International Conference organized by University of Ljubljana, EARL Ljubljana, and TRCCS (Taiwan Research Center for Chinese Studies) in Taipei

10-12 October 2019

Description:

Although the philosophical currents in modern and contemporary Taiwan belong to the most influential and important streams of thought in contemporary East Asian theory, they are still unrecognized as specifically Taiwanese. The main reasons for the immense importance of Taiwanese philosophy for East Asia and the contemporary world are twofold. First, they can be found in its contributions to the preservation of traditional Chinese, especially Confucian thought. Secondly, its development of specific innovative philosophical approaches and systems profoundly influenced the theoretical discourses in the entire East Asian region. The philosophical currents in modern Taiwan were mainly developed during the second half of 20th century, in which the philosophical theory in mainland China was largely limited to the Sinization of Marxist thought. Hence, for many decades, Taiwanese philosophy represented the only driving force of developing, modernizing and upgrading traditional Chinese thought and its syntheses with Western thought. Hence, they soon also gained a wide spread popularity in most of the other East Asian societies that were traditionally influenced by classical Confucian thought, as for example Japan and South Korea.

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CFP: Political Pluralism in Greater China – 大中华的政治多元化

Here is a call for papers for a workshop on “Political Pluralism in Greater China – 大中华的政治多元化,” to be held in July 2019 at the University of Lucerne, organized by Philipp Renninger (Lucerne) and Ewan Smith (Oxford).

CFP: Fourth Conference on Contemporary Philosophy in East Asia

The “Fourth Conference on Contemporary Philosophy in East Asia (CCPEA 2018)”(第四屆當代東亞哲學會議)will take place in August, 2018, and hereby issues a Call for Papers. This is a conference open to all fields in philosophy. For more information, see here or read on.

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NCCU Sheng Yen Postdoctoral Fellowship in Chinese Buddhist Philosophy

National Chengchi University, Philosophy
NCCU Sheng Yen Postdoctoral Fellowship in Chinese Buddhist Philosophy, 2018-2019

With the generous support of the Sheng Yen Educational Foundation, the Research Group in Buddhist Philosophy at the National Chengchi University (NCCU) is pleased to invite applications for a postdoctoral research fellowship. The term of the appointment is August 1, 2018, to July 31, 2019.

Website: http://thinker.nccu.edu.tw/app/news.php?Sn=1651

New Book: Lee Ming-huei’s Confucianism: Its Roots and Global Significance

University of Hawaii Press has published a collection of leading Taiwanese “New Confucian” Lee Ming-huei’s essays, translated into English: David Jones, ed., Confucianism: Its Roots and Global Significance. The Amazon link (with Table of Contents) is here.

CFP: NTNU Journal Special Issue on Overseas Study of Confucianism

The 師大學報 (Journal of National Taiwan Normal University) is seeking manuscripts on the topic of 域外漢學:以東亞與歐美的儒學/經學研究為核心 (Foreign Sinology: With a Focus on East Asian, North American, and European Confucian / Classical Studies Research) for an upcoming special issue. The deadline is April 15, for publication later this year. Details here.

New book on “Ecofamilism”

Wan-Li Ho, Ecofamilism: Women, Religion, and Environmental Protection in Taiwan (Three Pines Press, May 2016)

Ecofamilism proposes a new analytical framework, moving beyond ecofeminism, based on Western feminism and Christian theology, to illuminate Taiwanese women’s motivations and how they understand their role in the environmental movement. Based on extensive interviews with women founders, leaders, and members of six non-governmental, often religious-based, organizations from 1990-2015, the work presents contemporary issues in Taiwan from the perspectives of social anthropology, geography, inter-religious cooperation, and global ethics. Ecofamilism offers a new way of approaching life in contemporary Asia, engaging more precisely with while authentically portraying the experiences of Taiwanese women—whose gender roles are ancillary to motivations of family, religion, and society. Its key concept of ecofamilism pairs the notions of ecology and family while drawing on Chinese religio-cultural traditions of responsibility to the family to illuminate ecologically responsible positions toward society, environment, and all living beings. More information here.