Job Opening at NTU: Pre-Qin Confucianism

Department of Philosophy, National Taiwan University, Taiwan

The Department of Philosophy at National Taiwan University invites applications for the position of Assistant Professor. Teaching appointment is effective from August 1, 2021.

Qualification: Ph.D. in Philosophy or related fields

Specialization:

  1. Pre-Qin Confucianism
  2. Logic

Other Requirements: In principle, applicants should be competent in teaching in Mandarin and prepared to offer mandatory courses (teaching experience is preferable).

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CFP: Open Peer Commentaries: Australasian Philosophical Review

Theme: Moral psychology—insights from Chinese Philosophy
Lead Author: Shun Kwong-loi “Anger, Compassion, and the Distinction between First and Third Person”

Curator: Loy Hui-chieh
Invited commentaries from: Michael Slote, Chan Sin-yee, R. Jay Wallace, David Wong
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The APR is seeking proposals for open peer commentaries on Shun Kwong-loi “Anger, Compassion, and the Distinction between First and Third Person”

Proposal abstracts should be brief (200-500 words), stating clearly the aspects of the lead article that will be discussed, together with an indication of the line that will be taken. More details are available on the APR website, https://www.aap.org.au/APR/

Abstract submissions are due on 30 November 2020. Invitations to write commentaries of 2000-3000 words will be issued on 14 December 2020. Full-length commentaries will be due on 28 February 2021.

Critical Theory From and Beyond the Margins: Public Online Workshop

CRITICAL THEORY FROM AND BEYOND THE MARGINS

24 OCTOBER 2020, SATURDAY | 10:00 AM TO 6:00 PM (UTC +8)
ZOOM MEETING- ID: 976 4344 1616 | PASSCODE: 241
HTTPS://UMAC.ZOOM.US/J/97643441616?PWD=BTJYBLH5NMTNSDFFA2NML285WDJLUT0924

Critical theory is a Western, and distinctly European, intellectual tradition that drew its normative resources from the social and political events that transpired in Europe over the course of the 20th century. It is relevant to ask the question whether, as a critical-practical
tradition, critical theory has anything to contribute outside the Western-European context, given the emergence of globalization and the issues that arose with it. For some, the Eurocentrism of critical theory is symptomatic of its very own crisis, one which challenges the universality of its normative claims, e.g., the abolition of social injustice. Is it possible for critical theory to overcome its Eurocentrism and, therefore, its own crisis? The irony is that critical theory is only able to defend the universality of its normative claims when it is able to
renew itself. If it is at all possible to renew critical theory, what does this renewal entail? The workshop will pursue these questions by expanding the scope of traditional critical theory, especially, but not exclusively, by drawing on critical perspectives on modern societies and
emancipation movements that have originated in Asia.

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New Book: Cross-Cultural Existentialism: On the Meaning of Life in Asian and Western Thought

Leah Kalmanson’s new book, Cross-Cultural Existentialism: On the Meaning of Life in Asian and Western Thought, has been published by Bloomsbury!  A brief description of the book:

Engaging in existential discourse beyond the European tradition, this book turns to Asian philosophies to reassess vital questions of life’s purpose, death’s imminence, and our capacity for living meaningfully in conditions of uncertainty.

Inspired by the dilemmas of European existentialism, this cross-cultural study seeks concrete techniques for existential practice via the philosophies of East Asia. The investigation begins with the provocative writings of twentieth-century Korean Buddhist nun Kim Iryop, who asserts that meditative concentration conducts a potent energy outward throughout the entire karmic network, enabling the radical transformation of our shared existential conditions. Understanding her claim requires a look at East Asian sources more broadly. Considering practices as diverse as Buddhist merit-making ceremonies, Confucian/Ruist methods for self-cultivation, the ritual memorization and recitation of texts, and Yijing divination, the book concludes by advocating a speculative turn. This ‘speculative existentialism’ counters the suspicion toward metaphysics characteristic of twentieth-century European existential thought and, at the same time, advances a program for action. It is not a how-to guide for living, but rather a philosophical methodology that takes seriously the power of mental cultivation to transform the meaning of the life that we share.

Click here for more information about the book.

New Book: Transcendence and Non-Naturalism in Early Chinese Thought

Alexus McLeod and Joshua R. Brown’s new book, Transcendence and Non-Naturalism in Early Chinese Thought, has been published by Bloomsbury! A brief description:

Contemporary scholars of Chinese philosophy often presuppose that early China possessed a naturalistic worldview, devoid of any non-natural concepts, such as transcendence. Challenging this presupposition head-on, Joshua R. Brown and Alexus McLeod argue that non-naturalism and transcendence have a robust and significant place in early Chinese thought.

This book reveals that non-naturalist positions can be found in early Chinese texts, in topics including conceptions of the divine, cosmogony, and apophatic philosophy. Moreover, by closely examining a range of early Chinese texts, and providing comparative readings of a number of Western texts and thinkers, the book offers a way of reading early Chinese Philosophy as consistent with the religious philosophy of the East and West, including the Abrahamic and the Brahmanistic religions.

Co-written by a philosopher and theologian, this book draws out unique insights into early Chinese thought, highlighting in particular new ways to consider a range of Chinese concepts, including tian, dao, li, and you/wu.

Click here for more information.

TOC: Journal of Confucian Philosophy and Culture Vol.34

The editors are delighted to announce the publication of Volume 34 of the Journal of Confucian Philosophy and Culture (JCPC). JCPC is published biannually (in February and August) and welcomes contributions of both articles and book reviews by qualified authors from around the world. The journal is cross-disciplinary in its outlook and presents work from philosophers, anthropologists, psychologists, sociologists, historians, theologians, political scientists as well as other disciplines. JCPC examines the historical, doctrinal, literary, social, and political developments that have formed contemporary versions of Confucianism for the purpose of interpreting and exploring Confucianism from a modern perspective. The Journal is indexed in AtlaSerials, BAS (Bibliography of Asian Studies), MLA Directory of Periodicals, and KCI (Korea Citation Index). The attached file contains the cover and complete table of contents of Volume 34. The complete volume is available online at our web site: http://jcpc.skku.edu/.

Bai On-Line Lecture on Confucian Meritocracy

Of the People, for the People, but not by the People ― Confucian Meritocracy as a Correction of Democracy (BAI Tongdong, Fudan University, China)
Thursday, October 08, 2020, 07:00pm – 08:30pm

This talk is co-sponsored by Rutgers Global-China Office. It is open to the public, but registration is required; please see below for information.

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Open-rank job in Chinese philosophy at HKU

Applications are invited for appointment as Tenure-Track Professor/Associate Professor/Assistant Professor in Chinese Philosophy in the School of Humanities (Philosophy) at the University of Hong Kong (Ref.: 502112), to commence on July 1, 2021 or as soon as possible thereafter, on a three-year fixed-term basis, with the possibility of renewal and with consideration for tenure before the expiry of a second three-year fixed-term contract. Exceptionally outstanding candidates at the Professor/Associate Professor level may be considered for appointment on tenure terms. More information is here.