Vol 33 of The Journal of Confucian Philosophy and Culture (JCPC)

The editors are delighted to announce the publication of Volume 33 of the Journal of Confucian Philosophy and Culture (JCPC). JCPC is published biannually (in February and August) and welcomes contributions of both articles and book reviews by qualified authors from around the world. This attached file contains the front matter, including a complete table of contents, of Volume 33. The complete volume will be available online at our web site: http://jcpc.skku.edu/.

New Book: Dao Companion to Zhu Xi’s Philosophy

Yong Huang writes to share this news:
Dao Companion to Zhu Xi’s Philosophy, edited by Kai-chiu Ng and Yong Huang, vol. 13 of Dao Companions to Chinese Philosophy series, edited by Yong Huang, had just been published by Springer. The volume consists of 40 chapters, contributed by the best Zhu Xi scholars today. In addition to the Introduction chapter, it includes 4 chapters on Zhu Xi as a commentator of Confucian classics, 6 chapters on the relationships between Zhu Xi and his predecessors, his contemporaries, and philosophers after him in the Confucian tradition of China, 16 chapters on the various aspects of Zhu Xi’s philosophy, 6 chapter on the relationships between Zhu Xi and non-Confucian philosophical traditions, and 7 chapters on the contemporary relevance of Zhu Xi’s philosophy. It is the most comprehensive and most updated studies of Zhu Xi in English. The whole volume is over 1000 pages, reasonably priced at $149.

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New Book: Thomas Crone, Between Disaster, Punishment, and Blame

Thomas Crone, Between Disaster, Punishment, and Blame: The Semantic Field of Guilt in Early Chinese Texts (Harrassowitz Verlag, 2020)

The concept of having done something wrong is an integral part of normative thinking and thus a human universal. With regard to the early Chinese world of ideas and the resulting Confucian value system, consensus has it that the normative forces of “shame” have played a particularly strong role in the conceptualization and assessments of wrongdoings.

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Lambert Reviews Olberding at NDPR

Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews

2020.02.11 View this Review Online   View Other NDPR Reviews

Amy Olberding, The Wrong of Rudeness: Learning Modern Civility from Ancient Chinese Philosophy, Oxford University Press, 2019, 183pp., $29.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780190880965.

Reviewed by Andrew Lambert, City University of New York, College of Staten Island

Amy Olberding notes that this book is a response to increased polarization and conflict in civil life in the United States (ix). Besides political discourse, the problem of incivility or rudeness is found also in everyday social life — such as what to do when “Uncle Frank” makes offensive remarks about race, sexuality and immigration at the family Thanksgiving dinner (144). Olberding’s response is to turn to the Confucian tradition. The early Confucians’ commitment to civility can help us to re-think social relations, and arrive at an outlook that recognizes the difficulty of bridging gaps between us but also sustains a sense of solidarity.

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Job Opening at Tallinn University

Position: Tenure Track Professorship (career level I – Associate Professor)

Tallinn University, School of Humanities

Study Area: Asian Studies

Description: Chinese studies with a strong theoretical background in a subfield of social sciences or the humanities. The candidate will have an academic background that could (but does not need to) involve social or political anthropology, cultural history, studies of contemporary culture, human or political geography, history of ideas, philosophy, or political science.

More information is available here. Deadline for full consideration is March 10, 2020.

CFP: Chapter on Chinese ethics

Tom Angier edited a successful collection in 2012 entitled Ethics: The Key Thinkers (Bloomsbury Academic). Bloomsbury now wants a second edition, and Tom is looking for a new chapter on
Chinese ethics, with a focus on a couple of seminal thinkers from the Chinese tradition(s).

You can find the original version here.

Tom would be looking at a first draft being submitted by spring 2021. If interested, please contact him directly.

CFP: Confucianism: Comparisons and Controversies

Call for Papers: Confucianism: Comparisons and Controversies

Professors Eirik Harris (Hong Kong Baptist University) and Henrique Schneider (Nordakademie) are guest editing volume 8.2 of the Journal Culture and Dialogue (Brill).

The guest editors seek 7-10 papers of high quality on topics related to Chinese philosophy, particularly engaging with all different types of Confucianism. This can occur from a perspective rooted within Chinese philosophy as well as in a comparative approach. The guest editors seek to put together a diverse special issue covering Classical Confucianism as well as contemporary themes for an audience that includes non-specialists in Chinese philosophy.

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