Warp, Weft, and Way

Chinese and Comparative Philosophy 中國哲學與比較哲學

Weekly Books of Interest (27 April 2018)

Ann Pang-White. The Confucian Four Books for Women: A New Translation of the Nü Sishu and the Commentary of Wang Xiang. Oxford, 2018. (Amazon link here.)

Bret Hinsch. Women in Ancient China. Rowman & Littlefield, 2018. (Amazon link here.)

Kevin DeLapp. Partial Values: A Comparative Study in the Limits of Objectivity. Rowman & Littlefield, 2018. (Amazon link here.)

Ann Pang-White. The Confucian Four Books for Women. ABSTRACT:

This pioneering book provides a comprehensive survey of ancient Chinese women’s history, covering thousands of years from the Neolithic era to China’s unification in 221 BCE. For each period—Neolithic, Shang, Western Zhou, and Eastern Zhou—Bret Hinsch explores central aspects of female life: marriage, family life, politics, ritual, and religious roles. Deeply researched, the book draws on a wide range of Chinese scholarship and primary sources, including transmitted texts, inscriptions, and archaeological evidence. The result is a comprehensive view of women’s history from the beginnings of Chinese civilization up to the beginnings of the imperial era.

Bret Hinsch. Women in Ancient China. ABSTRACT:

This volume presents the first English translation of the Confucian classics, Four Books for Women, with extensive commentary by the compiler, Wang Xiang, and introductions and annotations by translator Ann A. Pang-White. Written by women for women’s education, the Confucian Four Books for Women spanned the 1st to the 16th centuries, and encompass Ban Zhao’s Lessons for Women, Song Ruoxin’s and Song Ruozhao’s Analects for Women, Empress Renxiaowen’s Teachings for the Inner Court, and Madame Liu’s (Chaste Widow Wang’s) Short Records of Models for Women. A female counterpart to the famous Sishu (Four Books) compiled by Zhu Xi, Wang Xiang’s Nü sishu provides an invaluable look at the long-standing history and evolution of Chinese women’s writing, education, identity, and philosophical discourse, along with their struggles and triumphs, across the millennia and numerous Chinese dynasties. Pang-White’s new translation brings the authors of the Four Books for Women to life as real, living people, and illustrates why they wrote and how their work empowered women.

Kevin DeLapp. Partial Values. ABSTRACT:

When, if ever, is it permissible to afford special consideration to friends and family? How can we strive to be objective in our thinking, and is this always a feasible or appropriate aim? This book examines the categories of impartiality and objectivity by showing how they frame certain debates in epistemology, moral psychology, and metaethics, arguing that many traditional conceptions of objectivity fail to capture what is important to our identities as knowers, social beings, and moral agents. A new thesis of ‘perspectival realism’ is offered as a critique of strong objectivity, but in a way that avoids radical subjectivism or relativism. Locally-situated identities can provide their own criteria of epistemic and moral justification, and we may aspire to be impartial in a way that need not sacrifice particular perspectives and relationships. Arguments throughout the book draw heavily on resources from classical Chinese philosophy, and significant attention is given to applications of arguments to concrete issues in applied ethics, cross-cultural anthropology, and political science.

April 27th, 2018 Posted by | Books of Interest, China, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Gender | no comments

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