New Book: History of Chinese Philosophy Through Its Key Terms

An English translation of History of Chinese Philosophy Through Its Key Terms has been published by Nanjing University Press and Springer! Click here for more information about the book.  Below is a brief description of the book from the words of the book’s translator, Shuchen Xiang:

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Song Reviews Li, “A History of Classical Chinese Thought” (Lambert, trans.)

Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews

2020.06.17 View this Review Online   View Other NDPR Reviews

Li Zehou, A History of Classical Chinese Thought, Andrew Lambert (tr., intr.), Routledge, 2020, 353pp., $160.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780367230128.

Reviewed by Bin Song, Washington College

It is a daunting task for me to review Li Zehou’s work, not least because while born in and always philosophizing about the same land, Li had entered his intellectual heyday in the 1980s when I was not yet a teenager. While reading Li’s work using Andrew Lambert’s stellar translation, I repeatedly asked myself: what is the difference between him and me regarding the approach to doing comparative Chinese philosophy? Why is there such a difference? What can I learn from him? And what inspirations can Li’s work generate globally.  Since there are English resources[1]that introduce Li’s thought, I won’t dwell on those questions. Instead, I will critique Li’s philosophy as presented in this book.

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Postdocs on “new narratives” in history of philosophy

The “Extending New Narratives in the History of Philosophy” project has announced two postdoc opportunities for scholars interested in working on neglected philosophers — including neglected Asian philosophers (male or female). The historical period of the grant is currently focused on is 1400-1940. Please see here for more information.

Confucianism and Resistance in Hong Kong

Earlier this month Joseph Chan, a well-known authority on Confucianism at the University of Hong Kong, published a short essay (in Chinese) that draws on the Analects (especially 8:13) to think about people’s responsibilities when a state “lacks the Way.” A very brief summary: when Confucius says that in a state lacking the Way one should “yin 隱” (which is translated “conceal” in that Ctext link), he does not mean that one should hide away and fail to engage with the society. It might be worth contrasting this with questions raised in 2014 during the Umbrella Movement about the lack of Confucian discourse at that time.

New ISCWP Officers

On behalf of my colleagues on the 2020 International Society for Comparative Studies of Chinese and Western Philosophy (ISCWP) Election Committee, I am happy to formally announce that Prof. SUN Wei has been elected Vice President, and Prof. Mercedes Valmisa has been elected Secretary-Treasurer, both for three-year terms beginning on July 1, 2020. Congratulations to both!

Many thanks to our retiring President (Prof. PENG Guoxiang) and Secretary-Treasurer (Prof. Mat Foust) for all of their efforts on behalf of the ISCWP, and congratulations to our current Vice-President, who will automatically take over as President, Prof. Alexus McLeod!

With best wishes to all for healthy, restorative, and fruitful summers,

Steve