Author Archives: Justin Tiwald

New Book: The Wrong of Rudeness

Oxford University Press has now published Amy Olberding’s The Wrong of Rudeness: Learning Modern Civility from Ancient Chinese Philosophy.

A short description follows. I also recommend that people look at the brief blog entry that introduces some major themes and the remarkable first-person approach of the book to these issues. Anyone familiar with the look-to-oneself-first methodology and tenor of so much Confucian reflection will particularly appreciate this approach, and it makes the book all the more compelling reading as well.

Description:

In a time of fractious politics, being rude can feel wickedly gratifying, while being polite can feel simple-minded or willfully naïve. Do manners and civility even matter now? Is it worthwhile to make the effort to be polite? When rudeness has become routine and commonplace, why bother? When so much of public and social life with others is painful and bitterly acrimonious, why should anyone be polite? Continue reading →

New Book: Zhu Xi

Zhu Xi: Selected Writings has been published. This is the first volume in the new translation series, Oxford Chinese Thought.

This is the first book-length translation to give a comprehensive look at Zhu Xi’s thought and his place in history, literature, philosophy, and religion. It includes Zhu’s writings or lessons on a wide variety of topics, including his ethics, metaphysics, political thought, views on ghosts and spirits, objections to Daoism and Buddhism, selected commentaries, and his thoughts on literature, poetry, and current social conditions. The volume is edited by Philip J. Ivanhoe with contributions from experts in various areas and aspects of Zhu Xi’s writings.

The book has been released directly into paperback and there is a companion website that includes the Chinese text for all translated materials, both of which we hope will appeal to instructors looking to adopt the volume for their courses. The paperback edition is quite affordable, and the easy reference to the Chinese text gives language instructors a way to teach Song dynasty Chinese as applied to a variety of topics and genres.

The table of contents is below the fold.

Continue reading →

New Book Series: Oxford Chinese Thought

Eric L. Hutton and I are very pleased to announce the launch of a new book series devoted exclusively to translations of Chinese philosophical and religious texts, Oxford Chinese Thought. The series will be published by Oxford University Press and, at least initially, all books will be released immediately into paperback. As most readers of this blog know, there is a vast body of philosophical and religious literature in Chinese and only the thinnest slice of it — barely a sliver — has been translated into English, which has created major obstacles to teaching and scholarship on Chinese thought, especially to teaching the post-classical thinkers in depth. Oxford Chinese Thought aims to address this longstanding challenge by providing high-quality English translations that are well suited for classroom use.

Translations are solicited by the series editors in consultation with the advisory board. We intend to focus primarily on post-Han texts that played significant roles in shaping Chinese thought. Continue reading →

New Book: Taking Back Philosophy: A Multicultural Manifesto

Taking Back Philosophy: A Multicultural Manifesto
Bryan W. Van Norden. Foreword by Jay L. Garfield
Columbia University Press

Are American colleges and universities failing their students by refusing to teach the philosophical traditions of China, India, Africa, and other non-Western cultures? This biting and provocative critique of American higher education says yes. Continue reading →

Discussion of Owen Flanagan’s The Geography of Morals

The widely-read ethics blog PEA Soup hosts regular discussions of recently published books (or more precisely, books recently reviewed for Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews, which are themselves recently published). The featured book this time around is Owen Flanagan’s The Geography of Morals, a philosophical call to arms against parochialism in ethics that engages at length with Chinese philosophy. Check it out!

MANCEPT Workshop on Confucian Political Theory workshop (updated)

I have some updates to share on the workshop on Confucian political theory at the Manchester Centre for Political Theory. Note especially the new deadline for submissions (June 2) and the keynote speaker (Joseph Chan).

The workshop itself will run from September 9 (Monday) to September 13 (Wednesday), 2017. The venue will be in Arthur Lewis Building, University of Manchester. Thanks to co-convener Baldwin Wong of The Chinese University, Hong Kong, for the latest.

Continue reading →

Bay Area Conference on Chinese Thought — deadline extended

Thor Harris and I have received several good abstracts for next year’s meeting of the Bay Area Conference on Chinese Thought (BACCT), but we could use a few more to round out the group. Please note that BACCT is meant for presenting works in progress as well as finished papers. Scholars working on Chinese thought from any disciplinary approach are welcome. And student presentations are also welcome, so please notify your grad students.

The conference will be held at the University of California Davis on October 14-15, 2017. Those interested in participating should submit an abstract of no more than one single-spaced page, along with a CV, in Word or PDF format. Please email these to Justin Tiwald <jtiwald@sfsu.edu> and Thor Harris <thorr@ucdavis.edu> with the subject line “BACCT Submission.” The deadline for submissions has been extended to May 30, 2017.