Author Archives: Steve Angle

Chris Fraser to move to Univ. of Toronto

I am happy to share this announcement from Martin Pickavé, Chair of the University of Toronto’s Department of Philosophy:

Chris Fraser (http://cjfraser.net), a well-known specialist in classical Chinese philosophy and comparative philosophy, who is currently Professor and Chair of the Department of Philosophy at the University of Hong Kong, will move to the University of Toronto in July 2021. At Toronto, Professor Fraser will be the Richard Charles & Esther Yewpick Lee Chair in Chinese Thought and Culture. His main appointment will be in the Department of Philosophy, but he will also hold a cross-appointment in East Asian Studies.

 

 

 

 

 

Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Early Career Fellowships in China Studies

The Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Early Career Fellowships in China Studies

Now Accepting Applications For 2020-21 Fellowship Competitions  

The American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) invites scholars seeking funds for research and writing to apply for the Henry Luce/ACLS Early Career Fellowships in China Studies.

Early Career Fellowships in China Studies identify and support innovative, early career scholars to ensure the continued intellectual vitality of the field of China Studies and to provide for its generational sustainability.  The fellowships are financially supported by the Henry Luce Foundation with additional funds from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Application deadline: November 2, 2020 9pm EST

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Translation of Zhen Dexiu’s Xin Jing

Ryan Chiang McCarthy has published a translation of the 13th c. CE text Xinjing 心经. As he explains the text was:

…compiled by the Southern Song Dynasty politician and scholar Zhen Dexiu (1178-1235, art name Xishan). The Xinjing is an anthology of selected texts, from ancient classics such as the Yijing, the Liji, and the Mengzi, accompanied by comments by the Cheng brothers, Zhu Xi, and other eminent scholars, mostly of the Song period. Its theme, as the title suggests, is the matter of cultivating the heart, or mind.

Please see here. Congratulations, Ryan!

Song Reviews Li, “A History of Classical Chinese Thought” (Lambert, trans.)

Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews

2020.06.17 View this Review Online   View Other NDPR Reviews

Li Zehou, A History of Classical Chinese Thought, Andrew Lambert (tr., intr.), Routledge, 2020, 353pp., $160.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780367230128.

Reviewed by Bin Song, Washington College

It is a daunting task for me to review Li Zehou’s work, not least because while born in and always philosophizing about the same land, Li had entered his intellectual heyday in the 1980s when I was not yet a teenager. While reading Li’s work using Andrew Lambert’s stellar translation, I repeatedly asked myself: what is the difference between him and me regarding the approach to doing comparative Chinese philosophy? Why is there such a difference? What can I learn from him? And what inspirations can Li’s work generate globally.  Since there are English resources[1]that introduce Li’s thought, I won’t dwell on those questions. Instead, I will critique Li’s philosophy as presented in this book.

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Postdocs on “new narratives” in history of philosophy

The “Extending New Narratives in the History of Philosophy” project has announced two postdoc opportunities for scholars interested in working on neglected philosophers — including neglected Asian philosophers (male or female). The historical period of the grant is currently focused on is 1400-1940. Please see here for more information.

Confucianism and Resistance in Hong Kong

Earlier this month Joseph Chan, a well-known authority on Confucianism at the University of Hong Kong, published a short essay (in Chinese) that draws on the Analects (especially 8:13) to think about people’s responsibilities when a state “lacks the Way.” A very brief summary: when Confucius says that in a state lacking the Way one should “yin 隱” (which is translated “conceal” in that Ctext link), he does not mean that one should hide away and fail to engage with the society. It might be worth contrasting this with questions raised in 2014 during the Umbrella Movement about the lack of Confucian discourse at that time.

New ISCWP Officers

On behalf of my colleagues on the 2020 International Society for Comparative Studies of Chinese and Western Philosophy (ISCWP) Election Committee, I am happy to formally announce that Prof. SUN Wei has been elected Vice President, and Prof. Mercedes Valmisa has been elected Secretary-Treasurer, both for three-year terms beginning on July 1, 2020. Congratulations to both!

Many thanks to our retiring President (Prof. PENG Guoxiang) and Secretary-Treasurer (Prof. Mat Foust) for all of their efforts on behalf of the ISCWP, and congratulations to our current Vice-President, who will automatically take over as President, Prof. Alexus McLeod!

With best wishes to all for healthy, restorative, and fruitful summers,

Steve

5th Greater China Summer Workshop Program in Chinese Studies (online)

The 5th Greater China Summer Workshop Program in Chinese Studies will be now held online. The program will start on July 17, 2020 and end on August 15, 2020. Applications for the online program will be open until June 19th, 2020.

In the online program, there are two types of participants:

-Active Participants-
Are expected to engage with the lectures, textbook, and pre-readings
As there are very limited places for Active Participants, some applicants may be placed on the waitlist

-Viewers-
Can attend lectures and submit questions to the lecturers, but are not expected to engage with the course readings although they are highly advised to. Viewer places will be given according to the level of commitment.

Application forms to be an Active Participant or a Viewer and the program schedule can be found on the program’s website.

Further questions can be emailed to info@sinological.org

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Twitter: @SdcfCharitable https://twitter.com/SdcfCharitable
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