Author Archives: Steve Angle

Ng on Li 理

NG Kai-chiu has published a new article in the Soochow Journal of Philosophical Studies 東吳哲學學報 (in Chinese) titled “Rethinking Zhu Xi’s Li: ‘Principle of Existence’ or ‘Pattern’?” that considers the interpretation of li 理 as “Pattern” offered my Justin Tiwald and me in Neo-Confucianism: A Philosophical Interpretation. The abstract follows, and the whole paper (and others from the same issue) can be accessed here.

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On-line Lecture: Tillemans, Methodology: Meditations of a philosophical Buddhologist

The Institute for the Cultural and Intellectual History of Asia (IKGA) at the  Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna, is hosting a series of lectures titled “Method and Region.”

The aim of this initiative is to reflect on the relationship between method and region. Here, methodcomprises the entire apparatus that enables us to conduct scholarly studies, including non-European theories and concepts. Region stands for what is contextually specific, such as language, history or thought. The full program is available here.

The first lecture in the series will be on Tuesday, 30 March, 18:00–19:30 CET:

Tom J.F. Tillemans (Emeritus – University of Lausanne) — Methodology: Meditations of a philosophical Buddhologist

Topic: There was a famous incident in the 1980s that sent shivers down spines, and probably still does. A prominent Princeton philosopher put a notice on his office door that philosophy students should just say “No” to the history of philosophy – Western and Eastern alike, I suppose. It may well be that the Princeton philosopher was a bit misinterpreted, but the echo of Nancy Reagan’s right-wing method to combat drug addiction – just say “No” – was unmistakable. I am going to turn the tables and look at some arguments by historians for nay-saying to philosophy, in particular those of historians of Asian thought and specialists in Buddhist Studies. Such arguments, too, don’t fare well. I will close with an instructive example from another field, linguistics, and will add a few morals to the story.

The lecture will be held online and is open to the public. To register, please write to office.ikga(at)oeaw.ac.at.

Upcoming lectures in the series Method and Region are:

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Guo Qiyong: The Humanistic Spirit of Universities is Being Lost with Each Passing Day

Guo Qiyong, Dean of School of Chinese Classics at Wuhan University and eminent authority on Chinese philosophy, recently published a scathing critique of the Chinese education system titled “The Humanistic Spirit of Universities is Being Lost with Each Passing Day.” Guo identifies three trends that harm humanities education:

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Opportunity: 2 Courses at Wesleyan next academic year

During Academic Year 2021-22, the Wesleyan philosophy department would like to fill two “per-course” (i.e., single course) teaching slots in Asian philosophy. This most likely will be one course in the fall of 2021 and one course in the spring of 2022, though we have some flexibility. We probably want to offer “Classical Chinese philosophy” in the fall and are wide open in the spring, but this  too could be negotiated.
Anyone who is interested should send me a cover letter describing what you would like to teach and something about your teaching experience, as well as a CV.
There is no hard deadline, but anyone who contacts me by February 15 is assured full consideration.
Wesleyan is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability, protected veteran status, or other legally protected status. We welcome applications from women and historically underrepresented minority groups. Inquiries regarding Title IX, Section 504, or any other non-discrimination policies should be directed to: Alison Williams, VP for Equity & Inclusion, Title IX and ADA/504 Coordinator, 860-685-4771, awilliams@wesleyan.edu.

Upcoming talk at Rutgers Center for Chinese Studies

The Rutgers Center for Chinese Studies is hosting another on-line lecture this week:
Title: A Philosophical Defense of Culture: Perspectives from Confucianism and Cassirer
Speaker: Shuchen Xiang, Peking University
Venue: Zoom (registration required)
Time: Thursday, Jan. 28, 7-8:30pm EST
 
The talk is based on Xiang’s forthcoming book with the same title from SUNY Press. Visit their website (rccs.rutgers.edu) to get more info and to register. The talk is open to public, but registration is required.