Category Archives: Books of Interest

New Book: Dao Companion to Zhu Xi’s Philosophy

Yong Huang writes to share this news:
Dao Companion to Zhu Xi’s Philosophy, edited by Kai-chiu Ng and Yong Huang, vol. 13 of Dao Companions to Chinese Philosophy series, edited by Yong Huang, had just been published by Springer. The volume consists of 40 chapters, contributed by the best Zhu Xi scholars today. In addition to the Introduction chapter, it includes 4 chapters on Zhu Xi as a commentator of Confucian classics, 6 chapters on the relationships between Zhu Xi and his predecessors, his contemporaries, and philosophers after him in the Confucian tradition of China, 16 chapters on the various aspects of Zhu Xi’s philosophy, 6 chapter on the relationships between Zhu Xi and non-Confucian philosophical traditions, and 7 chapters on the contemporary relevance of Zhu Xi’s philosophy. It is the most comprehensive and most updated studies of Zhu Xi in English. The whole volume is over 1000 pages, reasonably priced at $149.

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New Book: Thomas Crone, Between Disaster, Punishment, and Blame

Thomas Crone, Between Disaster, Punishment, and Blame: The Semantic Field of Guilt in Early Chinese Texts (Harrassowitz Verlag, 2020)

The concept of having done something wrong is an integral part of normative thinking and thus a human universal. With regard to the early Chinese world of ideas and the resulting Confucian value system, consensus has it that the normative forces of “shame” have played a particularly strong role in the conceptualization and assessments of wrongdoings.

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New Book: Bell and Wang, Just Hierarchy

Daniel A. Bell (贝淡宁) and Wang Pei (汪沛)’s new book Just Hierarchy: Why Social Hierarchies Matter in China and the Rest of the World will be officially published by Princeton University Press in March but advance copies have arrived in the warehouse and the book can be ordered on the PUP website. Please enter discount code C285 for 30% off. The discount expires June 30, 2020. For more information from the press, read on.

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New Book: State-Society Relations and Confucian Revivalism in Contemporary China

Qin PANG has published State-Society Relations and Confucian Revivalism in Contemporary China (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019); see here for details. The abstract:

This book is a study of the causes of the Confucian revival and the party-state’s response in China today. It concentrates on the interactions between state and society, and the implications for the Chinese state’s control over society, or in other words, its survival over a rapidly modernizing society. The book explores the answers to questions such as: Why has Confucianism suddenly gathered great momentum in contemporary Chinese society? What is the role of the Chinese state in its rise? Is the state really the orchestrator of the Confucian revival as has been widely assumed? This book will be of interest to think-tank and policy researchers, sinologists, and those with an interest in Chinese society.

New Book: Bai, Against Political Equality—The Confucian Case

Bai Tongdong writes with information about his new book — congratulations!

My new book, Against Political Equality—The Confucian Case was just published by Princeton University Press.  In this book, I offer a viable political alternative to liberal democracy that is inspired by Confucian ideas.  In domestic governance, I argue that Confucianism can embrace the liberal aspects of democracy along with the democratic ideas of equal opportunities and governmental accountability to the people.  But Confucianism would give more political decision-making power to those with the moral, practical, and intellectual capacities of caring for the people. While most democratic thinkers still focus on strengthening equality to cure the ills of democracy, the proposed hybrid regime—made up of Confucian-inspired meritocratic elements with democratic elements and a quasiliberal system of laws and rights—recognizes that egalitarian elements are sometimes in conflict with good governance and the protection of liberties, and defends liberal aspects by restricting democratic ones.  I apply these views to the international realm by supporting a hierarchical order, the “Confucian New Tian Xia Order,” based on how humane each state is toward its own and other peoples, and the principle of international interventions under this order whereby humane responsibilities override sovereignty.

PUP’s official link: https://press.princeton.edu/books/hardcover/9780691195995/against-political-equality

(Enter discount code BAI1 on the PUP website to get 30% off, through June 30, 2020. *Shipping charges and local import fees apply*)

Amazon’s page:

https://www.amazon.com/Against-Political-Equality-Confucian-Princeton-China/dp/0691195994/