Category Archives: Buddhism

Updates on SKKU Conference “Confucianism, Buddhism, and Kantian Moral Theory”

The Sungkyun Institute for Confucian Studies and East Asian Philosophy (SICEP) at Sungkyunkwan University will be hosting an international conference on September 6-7th, featuring the title: Confucianism, Buddhism, and Kantian Moral Theory.

For further details, please see here for the poster and the webpage.

APA Newsletter on Asian and Asian-American Philosophers and Philosophies

APA Newsletter on Asian and Asian-American Philosophers and Philosophies
From the Guest Editor
“Buddhist Philosophy Worldwide: Perspectives and Programs,” Rafal Stepien
Submission Guidelines and Information
Articles
“Buddhist Philosophy in Australian Universities,” John Powers and Leesa S. Davis
“Buddhist Philosophy, and Eastern Philosophy in General, in Israel and Palestine,” Roy Tzohar
“Buddhist Philosophy in the Kathmandu Valley,” Karin Meyers
“Buddhist Philosophy in Poland: Legacy and Prospects,” Jakub Zamorski
“Study of Buddhist Philosophy in Sri Lanka,” Asanga Tilakaratne
“Buddhist Philosophy in Two Japanese Cross-Philosophical Approaches,” Shinya Moriyama
“Sanskrit-based Buddhist Philosophy in China Today,” He Huanhuan
“Teaching Buddhism as Philosophy,” Zhihua Yao
“Preserving the Four Noble Truths at the Heart of Buddhist Pedagogy,” Joseph McClellan
“Sailing against the Current: The Buddha, Buddhism, and Methodology,” Hari Shankar Prasad

2018 Dao Best Essay Award Announcement

2018 Dao Annual Best Essay Award

Dao has established “The Annual Best Essay Award” since 2007. In addition to a certificate of achievement, the award comes along with a prize of US$1,000. The award winners are noted in the website of the journal as well as the website of Springer, the publisher of the journal. The award ceremony is held each year at the American Philosophical Association Annual Meeting (Eastern Division) in January, where a special panel on the theme of the award winning essay is held. The critical comments and the author’s responses to them presented at the panel, after revision, will be published in the last issue of Dao each year.

The selection process consists of two stages. At the beginning of each year, a nominating committee of at least three editorial members, who have not published in Dao in the given year, is established. This committee is charged with the task of nominating three best essays published in the previous year. These three essays are then sent to the whole editorial board for deliberation. The final winner is decided by a vote by all editorial board members who are not authors of the nominated essays.

The editorial board has just finished its deliberation on the best essay published in 2018, and the award is given to:

Paul J. D’Ambrosio, Hans-Rudolf Kantor, Hans-Georg Moeller, “Incongruent Names: A Theme in the History of Chinese Philosophy,” Volume 17, Issue 3, March 2018, pp. 305-330. (The paper is set for free access by clicking the title here.)

Continue reading →

New Book Series: Oxford Chinese Thought

Eric L. Hutton and I are very pleased to announce the launch of a new book series devoted exclusively to translations of Chinese philosophical and religious texts, Oxford Chinese Thought. The series will be published by Oxford University Press and, at least initially, all books will be released immediately into paperback. As most readers of this blog know, there is a vast body of philosophical and religious literature in Chinese and only the thinnest slice of it — barely a sliver — has been translated into English, which has created major obstacles to teaching and scholarship on Chinese thought, especially to teaching the post-classical thinkers in depth. Oxford Chinese Thought aims to address this longstanding challenge by providing high-quality English translations that are well suited for classroom use.

Translations are solicited by the series editors in consultation with the advisory board. We intend to focus primarily on post-Han texts that played significant roles in shaping Chinese thought. Continue reading →

SKKU Conference on Confucianism, Buddhism, and Kantian Moral Theory

The Sungkyun Institute for Confucian Studies and East Asian Philosophy (SKKU) is delighted to announce that it will host an International Conference on the theme Confucianism, Buddhism, and Kantian Moral Theory, 6-7 September 2019 on the campus of Sunkyunkwan University, Seoul, Korea. This event is made possible by a generous grant from The American Council of Learned Societies with support from the Chiang Ching-kuo Foundation for International Scholarly Exchange.

Continue reading →

Conference in Taipei: “Phenomenology and Chinese Philosophy” (March 18-20)

Dear colleagues,

this is to inform you about the international conference “Selfhood, Otherness, and Cultivation. Phenomenology and Chinese Philosophy” (March 18-20, at National Chengchi University in Taipei). You can still register on our website which also contains many helpful information (list of speakers, abstracts, etc.). The conference is co-hosted by the philosophy department and the interdisciplinary “Research Center on Chinese Cultural Subjectivity in Taiwan” at National Chengchi University. Our guest of honor is Dan Zahavi (Kopenhagen/Oxford) who, besides participating in our conference, will also give a series of lectures next week (see here).

Cordially,
Kai Marchal

 

 

 

CFP: Ecology and Buddhist Philosophy Panel

Professor Dominic Sur from Utah State University will be organizing the Ecology and Buddhist Philosophy panel for the Fall 2019 AAR conference. If you are interested in contributing a paper for this panel, please contact professor Sur as soon as possible with a proposal (max 300 words) through email: dominic.sur@usu.edu.

March 1st Columbia University Seminar on Neo-Confucian Studies

The next session of the Columbia University Seminar on Neo-Confucian Studies will convene on March 1st, from 3:30 to 5:30 pm in the main board room of the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University. The speaker will be Jennifer Eichman, who will be presenting a paper entitled “Refreshingly Experimental: Crafting Confucian Arguments with a Buddhist Lexicon.”

Please contact Zach Berge-Becker <zsb2109@columbia.edu>, Rapporteur for the Seminar on Neo-Confucian Studies, if you would like to attend the seminar and thus receive a copy of the paper, which is a work in progress and is not to be further distributed or copied without permission of the author.

Book Reviews by Bin Song

Bin Song (Washington College) has recently published reviews of two books:

Paul Tillich and Asian Religions. Edited by Keith CHAN Ka-fu and William NG Yau-nang (Boston: De Gruyter, 2017). “Asian Religions” here mainly refer to Buddhism and Confucianism. The review is published by the Journal of Interreligious Studies, and can be accessed through here.

Confucianisms for a Changing World Cultural Order. Edited by Roger T. Ames, Peter D. Hershock (Honolulu, HI: University of Hawaii Press, 2017). The review is published by “Reading Religion” in the American Academy of Religion, which you can find here.