Category Archives: China

Position: Berggruen Fellowship, University of Southern California

The Berggruen Institute seeks to encourage a deeper understanding of the great political, economic, social, and cultural transformations that are reshaping the human condition, in order to better inform practical responses. It organizes and supports inquiries that bring multicultural and interdisciplinary knowledge to questions of governance, of philosophy and culture, and of global restructuring including especially the role of China. To this end, USC Dornsife Center on Science, Technology and Public Life (CSTPL) and the Berggruen Institute (BI) will sponsor up to ten (10) fellowships at the University of Southern California for the academic year 2020-21.

Website: https://usccareers.usc.edu/job/los-angeles/usc-dornsife-berggruen-fellow/1209/14166783

Ph.D. Programs in Philosophy at the Chinese University of Hong Kong

The Philosophy Department of the Chinese University of Hong Kong is calling for applications for its Ph.D. programs that start from Fall 2020. The CUHK has a world-renown program in philosophy, equally strong in Chinese philosophy, analytic philosophy, and Continental philosophy. In the QS Subject Rankings in the most recent three years, it is ranked as the best philosophy program in Asia (it was ranked at the 30th, 34th, and 28th world-wide respectively in the last three years).

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New Journal / Roundtable on Kim, Confucian Public Reason

Thanks to Kyung Rok Kwon for sharing the following information and the linked PDF of the the journal’s roundtable!

The Hong Kong Journal of Law and Public Affairs (HKJLPA) is the first student-edited
law and political science journal in all of Asia, established by the Government and Laws
Committee, Politics and Public Administration Association, with full support
from the Bachelor of Social Sciences (Government and Laws) and Bachelor of Laws
Programme (BSocSc (Govt&Laws) & LLB / Government and Laws / GLaws) at The University
of Hong Kong in 2018.

The theme of the inaugural volume is “Confucian Democracy and Constitutionalism”. In this volume, not only four articles on the theme but also book symposium for Prof. Kim’s Public Reason Confucianism will be published. The full text of the issue is available for download here.

Job at Hong Kong Baptist University

HONG KONG BAPTIST UNIVERSITY FACULTY OF ARTS

Jao Tsung-I Academy of Sinology

Named after Professor Jao Tsung-i, the world-renowned expert in Chinese classical studies, the Jao Tsung-I Academy of Sinology was established in January 2013 for the purpose of understanding and preserving Chinese cultural heritage. The Academy aims to be a leading center for interdisciplinary studies of Chinese culture and civilization, through innovative research and engaged teaching. Applications are now invited for the following position:

Research Assistant Professor (PR0137/19-20)

The appointee is expected to (i) undertake original scholarly research in his/her area of expertise; (ii) teach one course per semester at the undergraduate/postgraduate level; (iii) assist in preparing and editing high quality scholarly publications of the Academy; (iv) take up a leading role to oversee the editorial team; (v) supervise research students; (vi) help supervise events and collections of the Academy. Research duties include application for external research grants and participation in research projects, overseas seminars and conferences.

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Vedal at Columbia Neo-Confucianism Seminar

The next session of the Columbia Seminar on Neo-Confucian Studies (University Seminar #567) will convene on November 1st, from 3:30 to 5:30pm in the main board room of the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University.
The speaker will be Nathan Vedal, who will be sharing his book chapter titled “Script, Antiquity, and Mental Training: Metaphysical Inquiry into the History of Writing.” This will be part of his new book The Culture of Language in Ming China. If you plan on attending and would like a copy of the paper, please contact Chuyu Tian, Rapporteur for the Seminar on Neo-Confucian Studies, at ct2823@columbia.edu.

New article: Jiang & O’Dwyer, “The Universal Ambitions Of China’s Illiberal Confucian Scholars”

T. H. Jiang & Shuan O’Dwyer, “The Universal Ambitions Of China’s Illiberal Confucian Scholars,” has been published in the on-line journal Palladium. It begins:

Amid today’s talk of a coming civilizational clash between China and the West, it is easy to find philosophical experts on China holding forth on the cultural contours of Sino-Western civilizational difference. “China has always been and always will continue to be a communitarian society,” some have insisted; and its Confucian ethos is not a doctrine like America’s liberal individualism, but is instead the “ongoing narrative of a specific community of a people, the center of an ongoing ‘way’ or Dao.”

Such explanations amount to orientalist fantasies. How an industrialized society like modern China, transformed by both Communism and market reforms could still be defined by primordial cultural characteristics is not explained. Moreover, far from being a continuous, deeply organic narrative of the Chinese people, Confucianism is a diverse set of doctrines that have been ideologically contested, marginalized, reinvented and imposed as state dogmas at different times in Chinese history. This point holds for a brand of illiberal, statist Confucianism being promoted today in some of China’s leading universities, a brand whose future is still uncertain, but whose proponents hold out great hopes for its adoption into Chinese Communist Party orthodoxy. Moreover, this reinvented nationalist Confucianism is not without precedent in the modern history of East Asia; over a century ago, Japanese scholars educated in Europe were the pioneers of such a reinvention. This precedent, its cross-cultural inspirations, and its present day historical parallels in contemporary Chinese intellectual life merit examination, in view of the claims made by scholars for the cultural centrality of Confucianism in a morally renewed, globally rising China….

Roberts, “Why Confucius Rubs America the Wrong Way”

Moss Roberts has published an opinion piece in the Asia Times entitled “Why Confucius Rubs America the Wrong Way.” Roberts begins:

The campaign to eliminate the Confucius Institutes from American education marks a level of ideological insecurity that has characterized this country for a long time. Willful ignorance about China has been an important part of that insecurity. The mission of the institutes is not ambitious; it is mainly devoted to offering Chinese language courses in colleges that lack them or have fledgling programs. As for Confucius himself, in America, interest in his thinking has never been strong; in China relatively greater attention is given to American thinkers and writers.

CFP: ECNU International Graduate Philosophy Conference, Shanghai

The East China Normal University (ECNU) Graduate Philosophy Conference will take place on 7-9 November 2019 and will focus on  frontier themes present in philosophies of the world in light of our ever-increasingly globalized context. Keynote speakers will include Roger T. Ames (Peking University) and Paul J. D’Ambrosio (ECNU). The title of the conference will be Theory (li 理) and Practice (shi 事) in Chinese and Western Traditions.

Applicants should prepare a presentation in English or Chinese approximately 20 minutes in length and submit to ecnuphilosophy@outlook.com before the deadline, September 23, along with the applicant’s name, nationality and the name of the university at which they are enrolled.

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