Category Archives: China

Vedal at Columbia Neo-Confucianism Seminar

The next session of the Columbia Seminar on Neo-Confucian Studies (University Seminar #567) will convene on November 1st, from 3:30 to 5:30pm in the main board room of the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University.
The speaker will be Nathan Vedal, who will be sharing his book chapter titled “Script, Antiquity, and Mental Training: Metaphysical Inquiry into the History of Writing.” This will be part of his new book The Culture of Language in Ming China. If you plan on attending and would like a copy of the paper, please contact Chuyu Tian, Rapporteur for the Seminar on Neo-Confucian Studies, at ct2823@columbia.edu.

New article: Jiang & O’Dwyer, “The Universal Ambitions Of China’s Illiberal Confucian Scholars”

T. H. Jiang & Shuan O’Dwyer, “The Universal Ambitions Of China’s Illiberal Confucian Scholars,” has been published in the on-line journal Palladium. It begins:

Amid today’s talk of a coming civilizational clash between China and the West, it is easy to find philosophical experts on China holding forth on the cultural contours of Sino-Western civilizational difference. “China has always been and always will continue to be a communitarian society,” some have insisted; and its Confucian ethos is not a doctrine like America’s liberal individualism, but is instead the “ongoing narrative of a specific community of a people, the center of an ongoing ‘way’ or Dao.”

Such explanations amount to orientalist fantasies. How an industrialized society like modern China, transformed by both Communism and market reforms could still be defined by primordial cultural characteristics is not explained. Moreover, far from being a continuous, deeply organic narrative of the Chinese people, Confucianism is a diverse set of doctrines that have been ideologically contested, marginalized, reinvented and imposed as state dogmas at different times in Chinese history. This point holds for a brand of illiberal, statist Confucianism being promoted today in some of China’s leading universities, a brand whose future is still uncertain, but whose proponents hold out great hopes for its adoption into Chinese Communist Party orthodoxy. Moreover, this reinvented nationalist Confucianism is not without precedent in the modern history of East Asia; over a century ago, Japanese scholars educated in Europe were the pioneers of such a reinvention. This precedent, its cross-cultural inspirations, and its present day historical parallels in contemporary Chinese intellectual life merit examination, in view of the claims made by scholars for the cultural centrality of Confucianism in a morally renewed, globally rising China….

Roberts, “Why Confucius Rubs America the Wrong Way”

Moss Roberts has published an opinion piece in the Asia Times entitled “Why Confucius Rubs America the Wrong Way.” Roberts begins:

The campaign to eliminate the Confucius Institutes from American education marks a level of ideological insecurity that has characterized this country for a long time. Willful ignorance about China has been an important part of that insecurity. The mission of the institutes is not ambitious; it is mainly devoted to offering Chinese language courses in colleges that lack them or have fledgling programs. As for Confucius himself, in America, interest in his thinking has never been strong; in China relatively greater attention is given to American thinkers and writers.

CFP: ECNU International Graduate Philosophy Conference, Shanghai

The East China Normal University (ECNU) Graduate Philosophy Conference will take place on 7-9 November 2019 and will focus on  frontier themes present in philosophies of the world in light of our ever-increasingly globalized context. Keynote speakers will include Roger T. Ames (Peking University) and Paul J. D’Ambrosio (ECNU). The title of the conference will be Theory (li 理) and Practice (shi 事) in Chinese and Western Traditions.

Applicants should prepare a presentation in English or Chinese approximately 20 minutes in length and submit to ecnuphilosophy@outlook.com before the deadline, September 23, along with the applicant’s name, nationality and the name of the university at which they are enrolled.

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New Book: Handbook on Human Rights in China

Just published: Handbook on Human Rights in China (Edward Elgar Publishing), edited by Sarah Biddulph (Melbourne Law School, University of Melbourne, Australia) and Joshua Rosenzweig (East Asia Research Director, Amnesty International). More info here; Table of Contents below.

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Book Symposium on Kim, Public Reason Confucianism

The latest issue of the Journal of Social Philosophy includes a Book Symposium on Sungmoon Kim’s Public Reason Confucianism (Cambridge, 2016):

  • Joseph Chan, Public Reason Confucianism Without Foundation?
  • Baldwin Wong, A Non‐Sectarian Comprehensive Confucianism?—On Kim’s Public Reason Confucianism
  • Franz Mang, Why Public Reason Could Not Be Too Modest: The Case of Public Reason Confucianism
  • Stephen C. Angle, Does Confucian Public Reason Depend on Confucian Civil Religion?
  • Sungmoon Kim, In Defense of Public Reason Confucianism: Reply to Chan, Mang, Wong, and Angle

SDCF 2019 Summer Program Podcasts

The Sinological Development Charitable Foundation (SDCF)’s 2019 “4th Greater China Summer Workshop Program in Chinese Studies” will be taking place starting next month. They are planning on posting podcasts based on each day’s lectures and activities on various social media:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sinological.org/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/SdcfCharitable
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sdcf.sino/

A full schedule is below.

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Journal Special Issue on Confucianism and Gay Marriage

The International Journal of Chinese & Comparative Philosophy of Medicine, issue 16:2 (2018), is devoted to a discussion of the ethics and legality of gay marriage, especially as it pertains to Chinese societies and as it relates to Confucianism. All the articles of this on-line, Chinese-language (though with English abstracts) journal are freely available here, and many of them are also posted on the Confucian Web (儒家网) here (an article by Zhang Xianglong and responses thereto) and here (an article by Fang Xudong and responses thereto). I also paste the table of contents below.

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