English-language MA in Chinese Philosophy, Religion, and Culture at Renmin University

The School of Philosophy at Renmin University of China has for several years offered a two-year M.A. program in Chinese Philosophy, Religion, and Culture (CPRC). All courses for this program (except Chinese language) are taught in English. It offers overseas students who are not proficient in Mandarin a valuable opportunity to study Chinese philosophy, religion, and culture whilst living in China. It also provides opportunities to study Chinese and experience intercultural communication with professors and classmates of diverse cultural backgrounds and experiences.

For more information, see the programs summary poster here, further information here, and the official website here.

For a list of specialists affiliated with the program, read on.

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On-Lecture on Filial Piety in Contemporary China

Piety without Obedience? Popular Discourse on Filial Piety as a Resource for Morality in Contemporary China Lecture (online), December 17, 16:00–18:00

Registration at: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZMvcemgqD4pHtwbv3Xm1wsOHWP42K7I_RkN

ABOUT THE SPEAKER
Marius Meinhof received his PhD degree in 2017 at Bielefeld University. From 2013 to 2016 he held a doctoral research Position at Bielefeld Graduate School in History and Sociology. In 2016, he joined the faculty of sociology at Bielefeld University as a research associate. He is currently the project leader in the DFG-funded project »Zivilisierte Familien. Diskurse der ›kindlichen Treue‹ in China im Zeitalter des ›chinesischen Traums‹«. His fields of research are China, Post-colonialism in China and Consumption, placing an accent on Governmentality in consumption.

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CFP: ISCP Conference

This is a reminder that the deadline for the individual paper abstract and panel proposal submission for the ISCP Shanghai conference in 2022 is December 31, 2021. Please send your abstracts or panel proposals to the Conference Organizing Committee at iscpecnu2021@sina.com.

Please see below regarding the hybrid platform of the Shanghai conference.

You can find more information about the conference at www.iscp-online1.org/conferences.

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Future of Cosmopolitanism Blog

P. J. Ivanhoe writes:

The U.S.-China Research Group on Cosmopolitanism consists of nine scholars from the United States and the Chinese cultural sphere who are pursuing a structured exploration of theoretical and practical problems related to cosmopolitanism. In particular, we are looking to draw upon Chinese philosophical traditions in order to explore alternative understandings of the nature and future of cosmopolitanism. As a first step, each member of the group has composed a short reflection describing her or his initial thoughts on the topic. These are presented in a blog at the bottom of our web page:

https://uschinadialogue.georgetown.edu/topics/research-group-cosmopolitanism

We offer these as points of departure for an ongoing conversation and invite comments and suggestions by anyone interested in this set of issues.

East China Normal University’s Skills-Based Approach to Chinese Philosophy

Paul J. D’Ambrosio, Dean of the Center for Intercultural Research and Associate Professor in Chinese Philosophy at East China Normal University, writes with some information on ECNU’s English-language graduate programs:

For almost a decade East China Normal University has run a highly successful graduate (M.A. and Ph.D.) program in Chinese philosophy taught in English. In recent years we have begun to implement a method of teaching Chinese philosophy that centers on the practice, or gongfu (“kung-fu”), of doing philosophy with classical texts. The gongfu or “skills-based” approach focuses on developing skills of close reading and interpretation in the original Chinese. We work together to understand, unpack, and explore the interpretive possibilities of specific passages within the context of the traditional works themselves. The core courses ask students to read aloud passages from the AnalectsLaoziMencius, and Zhuangzi in Chinese and then themselves lead investigative discussions of what those passages can mean. The professors guide discussion, helping correct misreadings and drawing on traditional and modern commentaries to elucidate which interpretations have historically proven most influential and (perhaps) why. While aiming to familiarize and inform, the emphasis in class lies on cultivating the skills essential to soundly analyzing the traditional texts.

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