Category Archives: Chinese Texts

ICSAT Lecture Series on Early Chinese Classics

The International Center for the Study of Ancient Text Cultures (ICSAT) at Renmin University of China is dedicated to the study of ancient textuality in a global context. Since its founding in 2017, ICSAT has held annual international conferences, workshops, and seminars on various topics. During the Spring semester of 2021, due to COVID-19, these activities will be replaced by a sequence of four lecture series―each of eight individual lectures―on the textual culture of early China. The four distinguished speakers will present their latest research together with introductions to Sinological scholarship.
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Call for Papers for Midwest Conference on Chinese Thought (Virtual)

16th Annual Midwest Conference on Chinese Thought
Wright State University
30 April-1 May 2021
The Midwest Conference on Chinese Thought was created to foster dialogue and interaction between scholars and students working on Chinese thought across different disciplines and through a variety of approaches. Submissions are invited for papers on any aspect of Chinese thought as well as papers dealing with comparative issues that engage Chinese perspectives.


This year’s conference will be held virtually on Friday, April 30 and Saturday, May 1 and hosted by Wright State University. Our keynote speaker will be Robin R. Wang, Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University.

Professor Wang will present “Dao of Rou 柔 (Suppleness): Proprioceptive Knowledge and Its Epistemological Value in Early Daoism”:

Through Chinese intellectual history, early Daoism, a Dao-based and inspired teaching and practice, has been considered the philosophy of rou 柔 (suppleness, pliant, yielding, softness), which the Daodejing couples with water, the infant, and the feminine. A popular Chinese binary expression of culture, gen 根 (root/foundation) and hun 魂 (soul/spirit), takes Dao as the root of Daoist teaching and rou as a spirit of Lao-Zhuang. However, rou has often been understood only as de (德) moral virtue or shu (术) strategy, something more practical than conceptual. This talk will respond to this theoretical gap and argue for rou as a form of proprioceptive awareness or bodily knowledge that shapes a cognitive style and an epistemological stance to guide our rational effort, illumination, and well-being. More importantly, this rou style of knowing embodies the epistemic value, such as intellectual humility, openness, receptivity and resilience, for a cognitive success.
Similar to previous conferences, we anticipate selecting 12-16 papers for presentation. For consideration submit a 1-page abstract to Judson Murray at judson.murray@wright.edu by January 31, 2021 for blind review. For more information, visit the conference website here.

5th Greater China Summer Workshop Program in Chinese Studies (online)

The 5th Greater China Summer Workshop Program in Chinese Studies will be now held online. The program will start on July 17, 2020 and end on August 15, 2020. Applications for the online program will be open until June 19th, 2020.

In the online program, there are two types of participants:

-Active Participants-
Are expected to engage with the lectures, textbook, and pre-readings
As there are very limited places for Active Participants, some applicants may be placed on the waitlist

-Viewers-
Can attend lectures and submit questions to the lecturers, but are not expected to engage with the course readings although they are highly advised to. Viewer places will be given according to the level of commitment.

Application forms to be an Active Participant or a Viewer and the program schedule can be found on the program’s website.

Further questions can be emailed to info@sinological.org

Follow the program on social media to keep updated with information:
Instagram: @sdcf.sino https://www.instagram.com/sdcf.sino/
Twitter: @SdcfCharitable https://twitter.com/SdcfCharitable
Facebook: @sinological.org https://tinyurl.com/sinologicalorg

APA Newsletter on Translating Chinese Philosophy

The latest APA Newsletter on Asian and Asian-American Philosophers and Philosophies has been published and is available here. The contents:

From the Guest Editor
“The Timeliness of Translating Chinese Philosophy: An Introduction to the APA Newsletter Special Issue on Translating Chinese Philosophy,” Ben Hammer

Articles
“Preparing a New Sourcebook in Classical Confucian Philosophy,” Roger T. Ames

“The Impossibility of Literal Translation of Chinese Philosophical Texts into English,” Tian Chenshan

“Translating Today’s Chinese Masters,” Dimitra Amarantidou, Daniel Sarafinas, and Paul J. D’Ambrosio

“Three Thoughts on Translating Classical Chinese Philosophical Texts,” Edward L. Shaughnessy

“Introducing Premodern Text Translation: A New Field at the Crossroads of Sinology and Translation Studies,” Carl Gene Fordham

New Book: Thomas Crone, Between Disaster, Punishment, and Blame

Thomas Crone, Between Disaster, Punishment, and Blame: The Semantic Field of Guilt in Early Chinese Texts (Harrassowitz Verlag, 2020)

The concept of having done something wrong is an integral part of normative thinking and thus a human universal. With regard to the early Chinese world of ideas and the resulting Confucian value system, consensus has it that the normative forces of “shame” have played a particularly strong role in the conceptualization and assessments of wrongdoings.

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CFP: 16th Annual Midwest Conference on Chinese Thought

16th Annual Midwest Conference on Chinese Thought
University of Louisville (Louisville, KY)
April 25-26, 2020

The Midwest Conference on Chinese Thought (MCCT) is an annual conference dedicated to exploring past and present aspects of Chinese thought. It is an interdisciplinary gathering of scholars and students coming from disciplines or fields such as philosophy, religious studies, history, philology, and other disciplines or fields in the humanities and social sciences. While the conference is hosted each year by an institution in the Midwest United States, we welcome the participation of scholars and students from around the world.

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Peimin Ni wins Scaglione Prize in translation

MLA’S SCAGLIONE PRIZE FOR A TRANSLATION OF A SCHOLARLY STUDY OF LITERATURE AWARDED TO PEIMIN NI FOR UNDERSTANDING THE ANALECTS OF CONFUCIUS AND TO SYLVIA ADRIAN NOTINI FOR THE VENETIAN QUR’AN; JOHN MARINCOLA TO RECEIVE HONORABLE MENTION FOR ON WRITING HISTORY

New York, NY – 4 December 2019 – The Modern Language Association of America today announced it is awarding its thirteenth Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione Prize for a Translation of a Scholarly Study of Literature to Peimin Ni, of Grand Valley State University, for Understanding the Analects of Confucius: A New Translation of Lunyu with Annotations, published by the State University of New York Press, and to Sylvia Adrian Notini, of the University of Bologna, for her translation of Pier Mattia Tommasino’s The Venetian Qur’an: A Renaissance Companion to Islam, published by the University of Pennsylvania Press. John Marincola, of Florida State University, is receiving an honorable mention for On Writing History: From Herodotus to Herodian, published by Penguin.

Please click here to download a PDF of the full press release.