Category Archives: Comparative philosophy

New Book: Freedom’s Frailty

SUNY has just published Christine Tan’s book Freedom’s Frailty: Self-Realization in the Neo-Daoist Philosophy of Guo Xiang’s ZhuangziIf you would like to either read more about the book or purchase it please click here. The publisher’s description:

This book starts with the radical premise that the most coherent way to read the Zhuangzi is through Guo Xiang (d. 312 CE), the classic Daoist text’s first and most important commentator, and that the best way to read Guo Xiang is politically. It then goes into Guo’s notion of self-realization (自得 zide) which is a conception of freedom that introduces a “dependence-based autonomy,” in which freedom is something we achieve and realize through our connection to others. In sum, the book makes a new contribution to Chinese philosophical scholarship as well as philosophical debates on freedom.

On-Line Book Workshop on Kim, Confucian Constitutionalism

Elena Ziliotti has organized an online book symposium on Sungmoon Kim’s recent book Confucian Constitutionalism (OUP, 2023) by inviting several philosophers and political theorists. Please see
https://philevents.org/event/show/121478
for details and to RSVP. The event is Thursday, April 18 beginning at 2:30pm Amsterdam time.

CFP: Proposed Journal of Social and Political Philosophy issue on Common Sense

In Eclipse of Reason (1947), Max Horkheimer provides a fundamental analysis of the ambivalences of the (Western) concept of reason and showcases what a dialectical understanding of reason could look like. The special issue of JSPP “Eclipse of Common Sense” proposes an analogous treatment of the concept of common sense. The issue will revisit the conceptual foundations and premises of common sense (analytical function); explore its ambivalent normative character (evaluative function); and suggest ways out of this impasse that are inherent (critical function). In a first step, authors will address from a conceptual and a historical perspective a series of parameters or intellectual constants at the core of the term’s conceptual content. Second, other papers will scrutinize the concept’s foundation for democratic societies and test the term’s political applicability by examining its emancipatory promises in regard to promoting core democratic values, e.g., inclusivity, plurality, and visibility. Third, some will draw attention to the dangers underlying every attempt to universalize the supposed qualities of a particular and contextually dependent, Western, type of common sense and extrapolate different ways to reconceptualize the term as well as different practices that help overcome it’s political-social shortcomings.

Anyone interested in submitting a paper dealing with an East Asian approach or approaches to common sense should contact Paul Patton prp@unsw.edu.au

Deadline for Submissions: December 31, 2024.

A poster with a graceful painting of Zhuangzi framing announcement for the symposium, with a marble bust of the Stoi Chrysippus and a drawing of the Buddhist monk Huineng chopping bamboo at his moment of enlightenment.

Moral Cultivation in the Premodern World: Craft and Transformation in Later Stoics, the Zhuangzi, and Zen

Yale’s Global Philosophy Reading Group warmly invites you to a symposium entitled Moral Cultivation in the Premodern World: Craft and Transformation in Later Stoics, the Zhuangzi, and Zen. The symposium will take place next Thursday, April 4th in HQ 136, from 3:30 to 6:00 PM, with a reception (food from House of Naan, Prosecco, and sparkling water) to follow. Please see the description, program, and abstracts below for more details. We hope to see you there!

If you know in advance that you’ll attend, please send a quick email to james.brown-kinsella@yale.edu so we can order enough food and drink for the reception.

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SDCF 2024 Summer Program

The Sinological Development Charitable Foundation Limited (SCDF) is happy to announce that they will be hosting the 9th Greater China Region Summer Program in Chinese Studies for 2024. This program is intended to happen both online and in person with participation from scholars and key opinion leaders. Scholar applications are due Sunday 28th of April, 2024. Additionally, there are scholarships available for accommodation at the university, meals, and a trip to Mainland China. Please click here for more information or the application forms.

Online Lecture: Confucianism and Kant

Professor Heisook Kim, of Ehwa Womans University (Seoul, Korea), is happy to announce that she will be giving an online lecture this Monday, March 19th at 9:00 pm (Standard Korean Time). The title of this lecture is “Knowledge without Transcendental Justification: An Examination of Confucianism through a Kantian Lens”. It should last for around an hour which will then be followed by a Q and A. Please click here to register to join the Zoom room!

CFP: Special Issue on Resemblance

Call for papers: special issue on resemblance in the Asian Journal of Philosophy

Guest editors: Ben Blumson (NUS, Singapore), Malcolm Keating (Smith College, USA)

The nature of similarity (or resemblance) and our epistemic access to it have been important topics in both contemporary philosophy and historical traditions, including, for example, Indian and Medieval European philosophical traditions. This collection of papers in the Asian Journal of Philosophy brings together philosophers across these traditions working on related questions.

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