Category Archives: Comparative philosophy

ToC: Asian Philosophy 31:2

Pages: 105-120
Published online: 31 Jan 2021

Bin Song Reviews Brown and McLeod at NDPR

Notre Dame Philosophical Review

2021.03.01 View this Review Online   View Other NDPR Reviews

Joshua R. Brown and Alexus McLeod, Transcendence and Non-Naturalism in Early Chinese Thought, Bloomsbury, 2021, 245pp., $115.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781350082533.

Reviewed by Bin Song, Washington College

To paraphrase Kant’s words on enlightenment, I propound that on the topic of transcendence and non-naturalism in Chinese and comparative philosophy, although we do not have a reckoned book yet, we finally have a book of reckoning. Joshua R. Brown and Alexus McLeod discern two major reasons why scholars assume there is no robust idea of transcendence, and hence, take naturalism as an inevitable lens for interpreting early Chinese thought: Firstly, some of these scholars would like to find in early Chinese thought something that is different from the West, mainly from Christianity. Secondly, some of them would like to find in early Chinese thought something that looks the same as the West, viz., the same as the scientific and analytic mindset prevalent in Western academia since early modern Europe.
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ISCP session at the 2021 APA Central Division meeting!

Xiaomei Yang writes on behalf of ISCP Executive Director Ann Pang-White:
The APA Central Division meeting will be held virtually on February 22-27 due to the coronavirus pandemic.  ISCP has sponsored a great session on Feb. 27 (see below).  We had three very successful sessions at APA Eastern Division Meeting. We encourage you to support ISCP session at the Central Division Meeting with equal enthusiasm.  The executive team would also like to thank Dr. Jing HU, ISCP liaison to the Central Division, for her excellent effort in organizing the session.
To register for the conference: https://www.apaonline.org/event/2021central
To view the whole meeting program: https://www.apaonline.org/page/2021C_program
Attached below are a list of the speakers from ISCP section on the program:

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Virtual lecture: Allan “Yin, Yang, and Qi before Yinyang Theory”

Yin , Yang , and Qi  before Yinyang Theory: The Role of Metaphor in the Formation of a Correlative System

Colloquium: Center for Chinese Studies | February 26 | 5-6:30 p.m. |  Online – Zoom Webinar

Speaker: Sarah Allan, Professor of Asian Studies, Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Literatures, Dartmouth College

Panelist/Discussant: Mark Csikszentmihalyi, Professor and Eliaser Chair of International Studies, EALC, UC Berkeley

Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

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An Interview with Bin Song

Attached is part 1 of a transcribed interview with Bin Song from the Blog of the APA, discussing his origins in China’s complex cultural history, his move to France to study philosophy, and some preliminaries about Ruism (sometimes called “Confucianism”).   https://blog.apaonline.org/2021/02/19/on-flight/

ToC: Asian Philosophy vol. 31 no. 1

The latest issue of Asian Philosophy has been published. The Table of Contents:

“The Chinese concept of tolerance and the epochal spirit”

by Xunwu Chen

“Mindful wisdom: The path integrating memory, judgment, and attention”

By Marc-Henri Deroche

“Arthur Danto as a Zen master: an interpretation of Danto’s philosophy of art from a Zen perspective”

By Peng Feng

“The meanings of Zheng 正 in the Daoist classics”

By Joshua Mason

“Chinese philosophy of life, relational ethics and the COVID-19 pandemic”

By Jana S. Rošker

“Contrasting tools of thought: Chinese correlations and Western analogies”

By Travis Walker

“‘Confucianization of law’ revisited”

By Chi Zeng

 

 

 

CFP: AAR Confucian Traditions Unit for 2021 Annual Meeting

The Confucian Traditions Unit of the American Academy of Religion is inviting proposals for the 2021 Annual Meeting to be held, we hope, in San Antonio, Texas, November 20-23. The deadline for submissions is 5pm EST on Monday, March 1.
(Details below)

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Upcoming talk at Rutgers Center for Chinese Studies

The Rutgers Center for Chinese Studies is hosting another on-line lecture this week:
Title: A Philosophical Defense of Culture: Perspectives from Confucianism and Cassirer
Speaker: Shuchen Xiang, Peking University
Venue: Zoom (registration required)
Time: Thursday, Jan. 28, 7-8:30pm EST
 
The talk is based on Xiang’s forthcoming book with the same title from SUNY Press. Visit their website (rccs.rutgers.edu) to get more info and to register. The talk is open to public, but registration is required.