Category Archives: Comparative philosophy

Vol 33 of The Journal of Confucian Philosophy and Culture (JCPC)

The editors are delighted to announce the publication of Volume 33 of the Journal of Confucian Philosophy and Culture (JCPC). JCPC is published biannually (in February and August) and welcomes contributions of both articles and book reviews by qualified authors from around the world. This attached file contains the front matter, including a complete table of contents, of Volume 33. The complete volume will be available online at our web site: http://jcpc.skku.edu/.

New Book: Dao Companion to Zhu Xi’s Philosophy

Yong Huang writes to share this news:
Dao Companion to Zhu Xi’s Philosophy, edited by Kai-chiu Ng and Yong Huang, vol. 13 of Dao Companions to Chinese Philosophy series, edited by Yong Huang, had just been published by Springer. The volume consists of 40 chapters, contributed by the best Zhu Xi scholars today. In addition to the Introduction chapter, it includes 4 chapters on Zhu Xi as a commentator of Confucian classics, 6 chapters on the relationships between Zhu Xi and his predecessors, his contemporaries, and philosophers after him in the Confucian tradition of China, 16 chapters on the various aspects of Zhu Xi’s philosophy, 6 chapter on the relationships between Zhu Xi and non-Confucian philosophical traditions, and 7 chapters on the contemporary relevance of Zhu Xi’s philosophy. It is the most comprehensive and most updated studies of Zhu Xi in English. The whole volume is over 1000 pages, reasonably priced at $149.

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Lambert Reviews Olberding at NDPR

Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews

2020.02.11 View this Review Online   View Other NDPR Reviews

Amy Olberding, The Wrong of Rudeness: Learning Modern Civility from Ancient Chinese Philosophy, Oxford University Press, 2019, 183pp., $29.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780190880965.

Reviewed by Andrew Lambert, City University of New York, College of Staten Island

Amy Olberding notes that this book is a response to increased polarization and conflict in civil life in the United States (ix). Besides political discourse, the problem of incivility or rudeness is found also in everyday social life — such as what to do when “Uncle Frank” makes offensive remarks about race, sexuality and immigration at the family Thanksgiving dinner (144). Olberding’s response is to turn to the Confucian tradition. The early Confucians’ commitment to civility can help us to re-think social relations, and arrive at an outlook that recognizes the difficulty of bridging gaps between us but also sustains a sense of solidarity.

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New Book: Bell and Wang, Just Hierarchy

Daniel A. Bell (贝淡宁) and Wang Pei (汪沛)’s new book Just Hierarchy: Why Social Hierarchies Matter in China and the Rest of the World will be officially published by Princeton University Press in March but advance copies have arrived in the warehouse and the book can be ordered on the PUP website. Please enter discount code C285 for 30% off. The discount expires June 30, 2020. For more information from the press, read on.

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Ivanhoe at Columbia Neo-Confucianism Seminar

The first Spring session of the Columbia Seminar on Neo-Confucian Studies (University Seminar #567) will convene on February 7th, from 3:30 to 5:30pm in the main board room of the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University.
The speaker will be Philip J. Ivanhoe, who will be sharing his “Dasan on ‘Sympathetic Consideration’ (恕, Seo)“. This presentation will fill out and in some cases correct his earlier views on Dasan’s conception of 恕.