Category Archives: Comparative philosophy

“Indian and Chinese Religions Compared” sessions at AAR

The Indian and Chinese Religions Compared unit is sponsoring three sessions at the American Academy of Religion this year: 

  • Mind and Consciousness: Indian and Chinese Approaches
  • Indigenous Theories of Ritual in India and China (co-sponsored with the Ritual Studies unit; note that the papers for this session are being pre-circulated)
  • Yogācāra and Vedānta in Modern Chinese and Indian Thought (co-sponsored with the Hinduism unit and the Yogācāra unit)  

For details, please see below. Abstracts for individual papers can be viewed online: 

<https://papers.aarweb.org/program_book?keys=indian+and+chinese+religions+compared&field_session_slot_nid=All>  Continue reading →

New PEA Soup Discussion: Rowlands on Back on “Animals, Moral Agency, and Moral Status”

The third in blog PEA Soup’s series of discussions of cross-cultural normative philosophy has been posted: Mark Rowlands begins it with a discussion related to Youngsun Back’s essay “Are animals moral?: Zhu Xi and Jeong Yakyong’s views on nonhuman animals.” Join in the discussion here.

ToC: Issue 14:3 of FPC

【Current Issue: Vol.14, No.3, 2019】

Available at: http://journal.hep.com.cn/fpc

The essays are free to download from October 21st to November 21st!

FPC cordially invites you to submit research articles, review articles, or book reviews to FPC. Manuscripts should be submitted via email to submissionbjb@126.com. Your submission and any advice are welcomed.

Continue reading →

New Journal / Roundtable on Kim, Confucian Public Reason

Thanks to Kyung Rok Kwon for sharing the following information and the linked PDF of the the journal’s roundtable!

The Hong Kong Journal of Law and Public Affairs (HKJLPA) is the first student-edited
law and political science journal in all of Asia, established by the Government and Laws
Committee, Politics and Public Administration Association, with full support
from the Bachelor of Social Sciences (Government and Laws) and Bachelor of Laws
Programme (BSocSc (Govt&Laws) & LLB / Government and Laws / GLaws) at The University
of Hong Kong in 2018.

The theme of the inaugural volume is “Confucian Democracy and Constitutionalism”. In this volume, not only four articles on the theme but also book symposium for Prof. Kim’s Public Reason Confucianism will be published. The full text of the issue is available for download here.

KIM Sungmoon – Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy Lecture: “BEYOND THE PLURALISM DILEMMA — A CONSTITUTIONAL RECONSTRUCTION OF CONFUCIAN DEMOCRACY” Friday Nov 8

THE COLUMBIA SOCIETY FOR COMPARATIVE PHILOSOPHY

Welcomes: KIM SUNGMOON (City University of Hong Kong)
With responses from: OMAR DAHBOUR  (Hunter College & Graduate Center, CUNY)

Please join on November 8, 2019 at 5:30 for his lecture entitled,

BEYOND THE PLURALISM DILEMMA — A CONSTITUTIONAL RECONSTRUCTION OF CONFUCIAN DEMOCRACY

Recently, a group of scholars has challenged the moral legitimacy of Confucian democracy from a liberal philosophical standpoint. Continue reading →

New APA Newsletter

APA Newsletter on Asian and Asian-American Philosophers and Philosophies

From the Guest Editor

“Buddhist Philosophy Today: Theories and Forms,” Rafal Stepien

Submission Guidelines and Information

Articles

“Philosophy, Quo Vadis? Buddhism and the Academic Study of Philosophy,” Brook Ziporyn

“What/Who Determines the Value of Buddhist Philosophy in Modern Academia?,” Hans-Rudolf Kantor

“Buddhist Philosophy? Arguments from Somewhere,” Rafal Stepien

“Doing Buddhist Philosophy,” C. W. Huntington, Jr.

“Decolonizing the Buddhist Mind,” Mattia Salvini

“Reflecting on Buddhist Philosophy with Pierre Hadot,” Matthew T. Kapstein

“Some Suggestions for Future Directions of the Study of Buddhist Philosophy,” Jan Westerhoff

“Practicing Buddhist Philosophy as Philosophy,” Pierre-Julien Harter

“Emptiness, Multiverses, and the Conception of a Multi-Entry Philosophy,” Gereon Kopf

“Buddhist Philosophy and the Neuroscientific Study of Meditation: Critical Reflections,” Birgit Kellner

New Book: New Life for Old Ideas

As a student of Don Munro and one of the contributors to the book, I am very happy to announce that CUHK Press has published Yanming An and Brian J. Bruya, eds., New Life for Old Ideas: Chinese Philosophy in the Contemporary World: A Festschrift in Honour of Donald J. Munro.

The publisher’s blurb: “Over five decades, Donald J. Munro has been one of the most important voices in sinological philosophy. Among other accomplishments, his seminal book The Concept of Man in Early China influenced a generation of scholars. His rapprochement with contemporary cognitive and evolutionary science helped bolster the insights of Chinese philosophers, and set the standard for similar explorations today. In this festschrift volume, students of Munro and scholars influenced by him celebrate Munro’s body of work in essays that extend his legacy, exploring their topics as varied as the ethics of Zhuangzi’s autotelicity, the teleology of nature in Zhu Xi, and family love in Confucianism and Christianity. Essays also reflect on Munro’s mentorship and his direct intellectual influence. Through their breadth, analytical excellence, and philosophical insight, the essays in this volume exemplify the spirit of intellectual inquiry that marked Donald Munro’s career as scholar and teacher.”

Suggestions for 2nd Edition of Doing Philosophy Comparatively?

An editor at Bloomsbury contacted me about putting together a 2nd edition of my book Doing Philosophy Comparatively. In the next couple of months we’ll be gathering suggestions about what to add the new edition, which will include about 30% new material, and we’re trying to get as much feedback about the current edition as possible. If you have looked at the book and thought certain topics were missing or that parts of it could be expanded or have other suggestions for improvement, please send me an email at tconnolly@esu.edu. Many thanks!

New article: Jiang & O’Dwyer, “The Universal Ambitions Of China’s Illiberal Confucian Scholars”

T. H. Jiang & Shuan O’Dwyer, “The Universal Ambitions Of China’s Illiberal Confucian Scholars,” has been published in the on-line journal Palladium. It begins:

Amid today’s talk of a coming civilizational clash between China and the West, it is easy to find philosophical experts on China holding forth on the cultural contours of Sino-Western civilizational difference. “China has always been and always will continue to be a communitarian society,” some have insisted; and its Confucian ethos is not a doctrine like America’s liberal individualism, but is instead the “ongoing narrative of a specific community of a people, the center of an ongoing ‘way’ or Dao.”

Such explanations amount to orientalist fantasies. How an industrialized society like modern China, transformed by both Communism and market reforms could still be defined by primordial cultural characteristics is not explained. Moreover, far from being a continuous, deeply organic narrative of the Chinese people, Confucianism is a diverse set of doctrines that have been ideologically contested, marginalized, reinvented and imposed as state dogmas at different times in Chinese history. This point holds for a brand of illiberal, statist Confucianism being promoted today in some of China’s leading universities, a brand whose future is still uncertain, but whose proponents hold out great hopes for its adoption into Chinese Communist Party orthodoxy. Moreover, this reinvented nationalist Confucianism is not without precedent in the modern history of East Asia; over a century ago, Japanese scholars educated in Europe were the pioneers of such a reinvention. This precedent, its cross-cultural inspirations, and its present day historical parallels in contemporary Chinese intellectual life merit examination, in view of the claims made by scholars for the cultural centrality of Confucianism in a morally renewed, globally rising China….