Category Archives: Comparative philosophy

Updates on SKKU Conference “Confucianism, Buddhism, and Kantian Moral Theory”

The Sungkyun Institute for Confucian Studies and East Asian Philosophy (SICEP) at Sungkyunkwan University will be hosting an international conference on September 6-7th, featuring the title: Confucianism, Buddhism, and Kantian Moral Theory.

For further details, please see here for the poster and the webpage.

New Book: O’Dwyer, Confucianism’s Prospects


SUNY Press has published Shaun O’Dwyer, Confucianism’s Prospects: A Reassessment. SUNY’s website is here.

The publisher’s blurb: In Confucianism’s Prospects, Shaun O’Dwyer offers a rare critical engagement with English-language scholarship on Confucianism. Against the background of historical and sociological research into the rapid modernization of East Asian societies, O’Dwyer reviews several key Confucian ethical ideas and proposals for East Asian alternatives to liberal democracy that have emerged from this scholarship. He also puts the following question to Confucian scholars: what prospects do those ideas and proposals have in East Asian societies in which liberal democracy and pluralism are well established, and individualization and declining fertility are impacting deeply upon family life? In making his case, O’Dwyer draws upon the neglected work of Japanese philosophers and intellectuals who were witnesses to Japan’s pioneering East Asian modernization and protagonists in the rise and disastrous wartime fall of its own modernized Confucianism. He contests a sometimes Sinocentric and ahistorical conception of East Asian societies as “Confucian societies,” while also recognizing that Confucian traditions can contribute importantly to global philosophical dialogue and to civic and religious life.

CFP: ECNU International Graduate Philosophy Conference, Shanghai

The East China Normal University (ECNU) Graduate Philosophy Conference will take place on 7-9 November 2019 and will focus on  frontier themes present in philosophies of the world in light of our ever-increasingly globalized context. Keynote speakers will include Roger T. Ames (Peking University) and Paul J. D’Ambrosio (ECNU). The title of the conference will be Theory (li 理) and Practice (shi 事) in Chinese and Western Traditions.

Applicants should prepare a presentation in English or Chinese approximately 20 minutes in length and submit to ecnuphilosophy@outlook.com before the deadline, September 23, along with the applicant’s name, nationality and the name of the university at which they are enrolled.

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ISCWP Newsletter

The August 2019 ISCWP Newsletter has been published. This issue features:
1/Updates from several of the society’s members on their various activities
2/A call for panel/paper proposals and volunteers for the 2020 APA-Pacific Division Meeting in San Francisco
3/Notice of group sessions at the 2020 APA-Eastern Division Meeting in Philadelphia
4/Notice of group session at the 2020 APA-Central Division Meeting in Chicago
5/A call for dues and donations
This and past newsletters are available on the ISCWP web site at the following address:

http://www.iscwp.org/news.html

Three reviews in JAS

The most recent issue of the Journal of Asian Studies has reviews of three books of interest to readers of this blog:

  • Curie Virag reviews Michael Nylan, The Chinese Pleasure Book (Zone Books, 2018)
  • Yunte Huang reviews Haun Saussy, Translation as Citation: Zhuangzi Inside Out (Oxford, 2017)
  • Patrick Buck reviews Bryan Van Norden, Taking Back Philosophy: A Multicultural Manifesto (Columbia, 2017)

New Books: Behuniak, Experiments in Intra-cultural Philosophy

SUNY has brought out a major work by Jim Behuniak: John Dewey and Daoist Thought: Experiments in Intra-cultural Philosophy, Volume One and John Dewey and Confucian Thought Experiments in Intra-cultural Philosophy, Volume Two.

There is also a significant savings in buying the two volume set; see here. Congratulations, Jim! Summaries follow.

Volume One:

In this timely and original work, Dewey’s late-period “cultural turn” is recovered and “intra-cultural philosophy” proposed as its next logical step—a step beyond what is commonly known as comparative philosophy. The first of two volumes, John Dewey and Daoist Thought argues that early Chinese thought is poised to join forces with Dewey in meeting our most urgent cultural needs: namely, helping us to correct our outdated Greek-medieval assumptions, especially where these result in pre-Darwinian inferences about the world.

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