Category Archives: Confucianism

New Webpage for Journal of Confucian Philosophy and Culture

The Editor of the Journal of Confucian Philosophy and Culture passes on the following message:

We are happy to announce that the Journal of Confucian Philosophy and Culture has a new webpage designed to allow easier and more intuitive access to the journal and its content. The Journal of Confucian Philosophy and Culture (JCPC) is the only peer-reviewed, English language journal dedicated exclusively to research concerning the history and contemporary relevance of Confucianism. The Journal is indexed in AtlaSerials, BAS (Bibliography of Asian Studies), MLA Directory of Periodicals, and KCI (Korea Citation Index). Please visit our new website at http://jcpc.skku.edu/ and consider submitting work to any of the various sections of the journal: articles, reviews, or Scholar’s Corner.

New Book: Ames, Human Becomings: Theorizing Persons for Confucian Role Ethics

Roger Ames’s new book, Human Becomings: Theorizing Persons for Confucian Role Ethics (SUNY, 2020) has been published. The editor’s summary:

In Human Becomings, Roger T. Ames argues that the appropriateness of categorizing Confucian ethics as role ethics turns largely on the conception of person that is presupposed within the interpretive context of classical Chinese philosophy. By beginning with first self-consciously and critically theorizing the Confucian conception of persons as the starting point of Confucian ethics, Ames posits that the ultimate goal will be to take the Confucian tradition on its own terms and to let it speak with its own voice without overwriting it with cultural importances not its own. He argues that perhaps the most important contribution Confucian philosophy can make to contemporary ethical, social, and political discourse is the conception of focus-field, relationally constituted persons as a robust alternative to the ideology of individualism with single actors playing to win.

The Table of Contents follows.

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End-of-term report on “Living a Good Life”

My colleagues Tushar Iriani, Steven Horst, and I have a post at the Daily Nous site about our experience teaching a new “Philosophy as a Way of Life” course that centrally features students doing structured philosophical exercises associated with each of the four main schools we covered (Confucianism, Aristotelianism, Daoism, and Stoicism). The course website itself is here; each of the “Live Like a ______” weeks are linked from here. Comments or questions either here or at Daily Nous most welcome!

Journal issue on “Confucianism: Comparisons & Controversies”

The Journal Culture and Dialogue has published a special issue on “Confucianism: Comparisons & Controversies,” guest edited by Eirik Lang Harris and Henrique Schneider, available here: https://brill.com/view/journals/cad/8/2/cad.8.issue-2.xml
The essays include:

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Confucianism as Virtue Ethics in the Sinophone World

Almost 15 years ago when I spent a year in Beijing, much of it spent writing Sagehood, there was relatively little engagement with the idea that Confucian ethics might be helpfully understood through the lens of “virtue ethics.” Quite a lot has changed since then in the Chinese-speaking philosophical world. (OK, that’s an understatement; I’m confining myself to the question of virtue ethics for today.) Consider these 2020 articles:

  • Tang Wenming 唐文明, “美德伦理学、儒家传统与现代社会的普遍困境——以陈来《儒学美德论》为中心的讨论 [Virtue Ethics, The Confucian Tradition, and the Universal Predicament of Modern Societies—Taking Chen Lai’s Confucian Virtue Theory as Focus]” (On-line publication on 《儒家网》 here)
  • Yang Guorong 杨国荣, “德性、知识与哲学进路——由黄勇新著《当代美德伦理——古代儒家的贡献》引发的若干思考 [Virtue, Knowledge, and the Philosophical Road Ahead—Some Thoughts Prompted by Huang Yong’s Contemporary Virtue Ethics—Contributions from Ancient Confucianism]” (On-line publication on 《儒家网》 here)

Each of these essays, in turn, reacts to a fairly recent book-length publication, also in Chinese, exploring the subject in depth. (Details on the contents of Chen Lai’s book are here; Huang Yong’s are here.)

You might reasonably expect given what I’ve written so far that I’d now go on to explain and engage with the details of Prof. Tang and Prof. Yang’s take on virtue ethics and Confucianism. Alas, it’s all I can do right now to find time to share this much! Perhaps after classes are over….

CEACOP On-Line Conference on Confucian Pluralism

The Center for East Asian and Comparative Philosophy (CEACOP) at the City Univeristy of Hong Kong will host an on-line conference on “The Problem of Pluralism in Confucian Political Theory” on October 23-24, with an outstanding line-up of young scholars. More information is available here.

Online symposium: “The Lunyu 論語 and Its Neighbours”

In November there will be a two-day online symposium entitled “The Lunyu 論語 and Its Neighbours.” The workshop will be held online via zoom. For further details, please refer to: https://maddalenapoli.com/sitemap/blog-2/files/b1c130227398eaec5d907e30d3e0f421-4.html, and see below for the schedule.

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