Category Archives: Confucianism

[CEACOP Seminar] Can Confucianism Meet Contemporary Challenges in Hong Kong? by Professor Baogang He

The Centre of East Asian and Comparative Philosophy of City University of Hong Kong is hosting a public seminar on 19 August, 2019, titled: “Can Confucianism Meet Contemporary Challenges in Hong Kong?” The speaker is professor Baogang He from Deakin University, Australia. For more information, please see the event flyer here.

CFP: Vietnamese Confucianism for the Journal Asia Studies

The May 2020 issue will be dedicated to Vietnamese Confucianism, including its religious traditions, official ideologies and specific philosophical approaches.

The revitalization of the Confucian traditions during the 20th century has assumed increasing relevance and significance in recent decades. Today, the revival of these complex philosophical heritages belongs to the most important theoretical currents in contemporary East Asian theory. In this context, the term East Asia does not refer to a geographic or geo-political, but rather to a cultural zone, namely a zone that is defined through various common cultural heritages, especially through the common Confucian ideational tradition. In this cultural context, Vietnam, for instance, is also part of Eastern Asia, although in a strictly geographic sense it belongs to Southeast Asia.

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Who’s Which? Which What?

My guess, really just a guess, is that the discussion of role ethics or relational ethics might benefit from some direct attention to a couple of fallacies available for commission—one minor, one major.  I don’t know whether they’re actually committed or directly discussed in the literature.  Possible examples of each can be found in Henry Rosemont’s essay “Rights-Bearing Individuals and Role-Bearing Persons” (in Mary Bockover, ed., Rules, Rituals, and Responsibility: Essays Dedicated to Herbert Fingarette, Open Court 1991, pp. 71-101).  I’ll make that my text.  I don’t understand it.

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Confucianism and Household Servants?

This post expands a question I asked once in the old Discussions section.

It is sometimes said that the (or a) Ruist picture of moral psychology stresses family because Ruists stress the development of moral sensibilities starting with people’s earliest relationships, which are their childhood relationships at home.  So … what about household servants?

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