Category Archives: Lecture

Virtual lecture: Michael Hunter, “The Classic of Poetry at the Foundations of Classical Chinese Philosophy,”

The Department of East Asian Studies at the University of Arizona is pleased to announce the first talk of the semester in its EAS Colloquium series:

Oct. 6, at 5:00 pm PST (8 pm Eastern Time) via Zoom
The Classic of Poetry at the Foundations of Classical Chinese Philosophy

Michael Hunter, Yale University

Abstract: The standard narrative of ancient Chinese thought for the last hundred years or so has one very big blindspot: poetry, and especially the Classic of Poetry (Shijing 詩經), which was by far the most widely known and influential corpus of the Warring States period. Drawing on material from his recently published book (The Poetics of Early Chinese Thought: How the Shijing Shaped the Chinese Philosophical Tradition; Columbia UP), Prof. Hunter will present his reading of the ideology of the Classic of Poetry and show how that ideology reverberates throughout the early textual record.

Bio: Prof. Hunter is an associate professor in the Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures at Yale University. His first book, entitled Confucius Beyond the Analects, argues that extant Confucius material from the early period is much bigger, more dynamic, and more interesting than what the early imperial Analects suggests.

Updated Zoom link: https://arizona.zoom.us/j/86995685926

Questions? Email: hengdu@email.arizona.edu

Columbia Neo-Confucianism Seminar: Lederman on Wang Yangming

The next session of the Columbia University Seminar on Neo-Confucian Studies will convene on Thursday 9/23 from 7-8:30 pm EST, over Zoom.

Our speaker will be Professor Harvey Lederman of Princeton, who will be presenting his forthcoming paper The Introspective Model of Genuine Knowledge in Wang Yangming. Professor Lederman’s draft looks very well-formatted to me, but he says that he will have one more round of copyediting on it, and welcomes typographical comments.

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On-line Talk: Jenco, “Neo-Confucianism Beyond Moral Philosophy”

From Prof. Jun-Hyeok KWAK (郭峻赫) of Sun Yat-sen University:
We are pleased to announce the 19th Comparative Philosophy Workshop which will be held virtually at 16:00 PM to 18:00 PM (Beijing Time), 30th September (Thursday), 2021.
Due to the pandemic across the world, we will have a virtual (on-line) meeting. Should you wish to join the meeting, please email to the workshop coordinator to get the meeting password. We are going to use Tencent Voov Meeting, and any video recording of this meeting is prohibited.
At the 19th Political Philosophy Workshop, Leigh JENCO (LSE) will give a talk, “Neo-Confucianism Beyond Moral Philosophy: Chen Di’s Historical Phonology”

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On-line lecture: Confucianism and the Political Theory of the Business Corporation

Date: 17 September 2021 (Friday)

Time: 16:00 (HKT)

Venue: Online (This talk will be held via Zoom.)

Participants: Chi Kwok, Lingnan University; Sungmoon Kim, City University of Hong Kong

Registration is required. Please email: joogangl@gmail.com

Click here to view flyer.

Abstract: Despite the burgeoning literature in contemporary Confucian political theory, little effort has been devoted to the exploration of the implications of Confucianism to economic justice. Among the few exceptions, Chan (2013) argues that Confucianism would require a sufficientarian, yet inegalitarian, distributions of economic resources; Kim (2019) suggests that Confucianism could offer an account of the political economy of harmony where distributive values of equality, need, and merit “could have their own place”. Although these are important contributions, these works’ focal point is on developing a general outlook and guiding principles of a Confucian moral economy. This paper argues that the modern relevance of a theory of moral economy depends to a significant degree on whether it could offer an attractive normative account to the legally privileged economic agent, business corporation, which enjoys legal rights such as legal personality, limited liability, asset shielding that are unavailable to other market actors. The paper attempts to build a bridge between contemporary Confucian political theory and political theory of the business corporation for two purposes. First, it offers a better ontological account of the business corporation for Confucian political theory to intervene in debates about the business corporation. Second, it also offers alternative moral resources to develop a political theory of the business corporation beyond the usual liberal democratic framework in the literature.

On-line Talk: Knapp, “The Birth of Popular Confucianism”

10th June 2021: Prof. Keith Knapp (The Citadel) presenting “The Birth of Popular Confucianism: Evidence from Dunhuang of the Creation of the Twenty-four Filial Exemplars.” 

The Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, University of Cambridge holds a series of talks each term whose overall theme links with Dunhuang and/or the Silk Road. These take place via Zoom on Thursdays and require pre-registration. This week’s talk will begin at 5pm UK Time (BST), lasting an hour with time allocated afterwards for questions, debate, and discussion.

We welcome listeners from all fields who feel that these talks may help their own research or who are curious to know about the diverse topics covered. This seminar series is organised by Dr Imre Galambos with the generous support of the Glorisun Global Network and Dhammachai International Research.

To register for this week’s talk, please follow this link:https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJIodOytrTkpEtBYrzlCaz3_OTikd3n4KMJk

If prompted to enter a passcode, please enter: Dunhuang

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The Analects of Confucius – Seminar Series (Oxford)

Philiminality Oxford is delighted to announce an upcoming series of talks (online) on the Analects of Confucius. The ideas to be found in the Analects have been so influential that they are often seen as the cornerstone of Confucianism. In this seminar series, we will be hosting three talks on the Analects by leading experts in Confucian thought, covering topics in ethics and political thought.
  • Prof. Stephen Angle (Wesleyan University), “The Analects and Modern Moral Philosophy” (Monday 3 May, 3-4.30pm BST)
  • Prof. LI Chenyang (Nanyang Technological University), “Li as Cultural Grammar: On the Relation Between Li and Ren in Confucius’ Analects” (Monday 17 May, 10-11.30am BST)
  • Prof. TAN Sor-Hoon (Singapore Management University), “Confucian Democracy and the Analects” (Monday 31 May, 10-11.30am BST)
REGISTRATION:

To register and receive Zoom details, please register here: https://forms.gle/KnQuzkgW2r9j8zYx6

If you have any questions, feel free to email us at:  philiminality.ox[at]gmail.com.

Organisers: Heeyoung Tae, Lea Cantor, Sihao Chew, and Flaminia Pischedda

Abstracts of all three talks follow.

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EACP Online Event: A Digital Humanities Approach to Modern Confucianism

EACP Online Event: A Digital Humanities Approach to Modern Confucianism

Friday April 23, 2021, 2pm – 4pm (Central European Summer Time)

Ralph Weber, Philippe Major, Chan Yim Fong and Milan Matthiesen from the University of Basel will be giving an online talk on the topic “A Digital Humanities Approach to Modern Confucianism.”

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On-line Lecture: Tillemans, Methodology: Meditations of a philosophical Buddhologist

The Institute for the Cultural and Intellectual History of Asia (IKGA) at the  Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna, is hosting a series of lectures titled “Method and Region.”

The aim of this initiative is to reflect on the relationship between method and region. Here, methodcomprises the entire apparatus that enables us to conduct scholarly studies, including non-European theories and concepts. Region stands for what is contextually specific, such as language, history or thought. The full program is available here.

The first lecture in the series will be on Tuesday, 30 March, 18:00–19:30 CET:

Tom J.F. Tillemans (Emeritus – University of Lausanne) — Methodology: Meditations of a philosophical Buddhologist

Topic: There was a famous incident in the 1980s that sent shivers down spines, and probably still does. A prominent Princeton philosopher put a notice on his office door that philosophy students should just say “No” to the history of philosophy – Western and Eastern alike, I suppose. It may well be that the Princeton philosopher was a bit misinterpreted, but the echo of Nancy Reagan’s right-wing method to combat drug addiction – just say “No” – was unmistakable. I am going to turn the tables and look at some arguments by historians for nay-saying to philosophy, in particular those of historians of Asian thought and specialists in Buddhist Studies. Such arguments, too, don’t fare well. I will close with an instructive example from another field, linguistics, and will add a few morals to the story.

The lecture will be held online and is open to the public. To register, please write to office.ikga(at)oeaw.ac.at.

Upcoming lectures in the series Method and Region are:

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Virtual lecture: Allan “Yin, Yang, and Qi before Yinyang Theory”

Yin , Yang , and Qi  before Yinyang Theory: The Role of Metaphor in the Formation of a Correlative System

Colloquium: Center for Chinese Studies | February 26 | 5-6:30 p.m. |  Online – Zoom Webinar

Speaker: Sarah Allan, Professor of Asian Studies, Asian and Middle Eastern Languages and Literatures, Dartmouth College

Panelist/Discussant: Mark Csikszentmihalyi, Professor and Eliaser Chair of International Studies, EALC, UC Berkeley

Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

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