Warp, Weft, and Way

Chinese and Comparative Philosophy 中國哲學與比較哲學

New (?) Book Reviews at China Review International

It has just come to my attention that Volume 19, Number 4 of Chinese Review International has been published. This is dated 2012, but they have been running behind. I’m not sure how recently this issue was published, but anyway it’s new to me, and perhaps to some readers. Several recent books in Chinese philosophy are reviewed, including works by Jiang Qing, Michael Ing, Paul Fraser, and more. For those without institutional access, Yuri Pines’s review of Jiang Qing is also available on his Academia.edu site.

June 11th, 2015 Posted by | Book Review, Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy | 6 comments

6 Responses to New (?) Book Reviews at China Review International

  1. Paul R. Goldin says:

    They’re YEARS behind (even further behind than the cover date would suggest) and I don’t know the reason. I recall that they published a review of mine several years after I had sent it to them.

    • Bill Haines says:

      That sort of thing can be seriously damaging to young scholars–not just because their resume is missing a publication (or an acceptance) when it should not be, but also because people sometimes plan connected series of papers, and when the first has disappeared into a miasma, one can lose heart.

      • Paul R. Goldin says:

        Bill: Nobody would be publishing a connected series of papers in China Review International because all they publish are book reviews. It’s still unacceptable that they’re so far behind schedule, but I wouldn’t accuse them of destroying young scholars’ careers. They’re not important enough to be able to achieve that, frankly.

  2. Manyul Im says:

    That’s weird. I wrote a review late in 2010 and it was published in 2011. Turnaround was quick then. I wonder what’s happened since.

    • Steve Angle says:

      As I understand it, this journal has largely been run by graduate students, and there’s lots of turnover. That has sometimes made it difficult for them to keep up. I’m not sure where things stand right at the moment — how much backlog there is — but I expect it’s pretty considerable.

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