Warp, Weft, and Way

Chinese and Comparative Philosophy 中國哲學與比較哲學

Your Xing and What You Do

This post sketches part of the argument in my paper “The Warring States Concept of Xing,” which is just out in Dao 10.1 (Spring 2011). “Xing” is commonly translated as “nature,” though “spontaneous character” would be better.

There’s this idea that (in Warring States terms) it can be your xing 性 to do something even though you have no tendency to actually do it. This idea is badly wrong. And no one would take it seriously if they weren’t misreading the Mencius.

The big problem is that the Mencius seems to say that it is our xing to be good, and that people who study the Mencius are mostly trained to think that that claim somehow stands for or summarises everything else the collection has to say about human nature. And trying to interpret the claim so that it does stand for all that leads to some major interpretive troubles. Continue reading “Your Xing and What You Do”

February 21, 2011 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Human nature, Mencius | 15 comments

TOC for Dao 10:1

The latest issue of Dao (10:1) has been published, including work by contributors to this blog: an essay by Dan Robins and a review by Alexus McLeod. (And an essay on “prudence” by Kurtis Hagen that those of us interested in this topic should certainly read!) Continue reading “TOC for Dao 10:1”

February 21, 2011 Posted by | Chinese philosophy - 中國哲學 - 中国哲学, Comparative philosophy, Tables of Contents | no comments

****TO BROWSE MORE POSTS, PLEASE USE OUR SEARCH AND ARCHIVE MENUS****