Author Archives: Steve Angle

Summer School program in Translation for PhD students

The Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) is delighted to announce a new edition of the Ph.D. Summer School in Translation, Intercultural and East Asian Studies.

The Ph.D. Summer School is organized by the Department of Translation, Interpreting and East Asian Studies, and it will be held at the Faculty of Translation and Interpreting (UAB) during the week of June 17th to 21st, 2019.

Continue reading →

New Issue of CCT: The Adolescence of Mainland New Confucianism

The latest issue of Contemporary Chinese Thought (49:2) has just been published: an issue that I guest edited called “The Adolescence of Mainland New Confucianism.” The Table of Contents for the issue is here, and I believe you can freely download my introduction (also called “The Adolescence of Mainland New Confucianism”). The essays translated in the issue are:

  • Li Minghui, I Disapprove of the Phrase “Mainland New Confucianism”
  • Zeng Yi & Fang Xudong, Hong Kong/Taiwan New Confucianism Affirms Too Little of Traditional Chinese Politics (Parts 1 and 2)
  • Chen Ming, Mainland New Confucianism’s Problematique, Discourse Paradigm, and Intellectual Pedigree Have Already Taken Shape
  • Tang Wenming, Welcoming a New Stage of Confucian Revival
  • Chen Yun, The Mainland Confucian Revival and Its Problems as Seen from the Perspective of “Civilizational Theory”
  • Huang Yushun, Confucian Liberalism’s Judgment of “New Confucian Religion”
  • Guo Qiyong, How to Properly View the New Developments of Mainland Confucianism

For the abstract of my Introduction, read on!

Continue reading →

Song Reviews Liu, Neo-Confucianism

Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews

2019.03.33 View this Review Online   View Other NDPR Reviews

JeeLoo Liu, Neo-Confucianism: Metaphysics, Mind, and Morality, Wiley-Blackwell, 2018, 316pp., $34.95 (pbk), ISBN 9781118619414.

Reviewed by Bin Song, Washington College

This book is clearly one of the greatest accomplishments among English Neo-Confucian philosophical studies in recent decades. JeeLoo Liu uses clear language and rigorous philosophical reasoning to analyze eight pivotal Neo-Confucian figures regarding three major areas: metaphysics, moral theory and moral practice. The book can be aptly used as both an introduction to Neo-Confucianism for beginners and a top reference for researchers, which is itself a rare achievement.

Continue reading →

Kang accepts position at Washington and Lee

Li KANG writes to let us know that she has accepted a tenure-track offer from Washington and Lee University, and will be joining the Philosophy Department as an Assistant Professor starting in Fall of 2019. Her bio:

I got my philosophy degrees on three continents: a B.A. from Wuhan University (China), an M.Phil. from University of St Andrews (UK), and a Ph.D. from Syracuse University (US). From 2017 to 2019, I am a Visiting Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Vassar College. My main areas of research are metaphysics and Chinese Buddhism. While half of my work involves developing views within the analytic tradition, the other half involves showing how the analytic tradition and non-Western traditions enrich each other. Currently, I am working on discovering and developing the metaphysics of Chinese Buddhism in relation to analytic philosophy and cognitive science.

Congratulations, Li!

Hongladarom Reviews Epistemology for the Rest of the World

Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews

2019.03.30 View this Review Online   View Other NDPR Reviews

Masaharu Mizumoto, Stephen Stich, and Eric McCready (eds.), Epistemology for the Rest of the World, Oxford University Press, 2018, 295pp., $85.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780190865085.

Reviewed by Soraj Hongladarom, Chulalongkorn University

When I was a graduate student at the Department of Philosophy at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana back in the 1980s, I took the program’s required epistemology course. What struck me then was that its content was very much tied to the English language. It was not exactly the kind of English that I studied in my English major classes back home, but a simple one focusing on only a few words. The main analysis was of sentences such as “S knows that p”. Naturally, I came across the famous paper by Edmund Gettier, and I remember that I spent a large amount of time figuring out what was going on. Somebody had a true and justified belief that the man who will get the job has ten coins in his pocket, but in the end, he does not know that. I wondered what was going on. So I translated the whole thing into Thai thinking that doing so might help me understand the whole thing better, but to no avail. To a normal Thai-speaking person it was strange to think that such a scenario could ever happen. I remember that I had to impose the strangeness of the situation onto my intuition of English. Since I am not a native speaker, I assumed that English speakers might have some kind of intuitive understanding of how the word ‘know’ was used.

Continue reading →

2019 Greater China Summer Workshop Program in Chinese Studies

Sinological Development Charitable Foundation (SDCF) announces that applications are now open for the 4th Greater China Summer Workshop Program in Chinese Studies, a summer course targeted at scholars (including PhD students) who would like to deepen their knowledge of Chinese philosophy and other aspects of Chinese culture.

Continue reading →

First ISEAP International Conference

The International Society of East Asian Philosophy (ISEAP) is going to have its first international conference as follows:

Date: December 14-15, 2019 (Saturday and Sunday)

Venue: Surugadai Campus, Meiji University, Tokyo, Japan (http://www.meiji.ac.jp/cip/english/about/campus/index.html)

Theme: East Asian Philosophy: Past, Present and Future

Continue reading →