Author Archives: Steve Angle

New Discussion Series at PEA Soup / First Topic: Kim on Mencius

The terrific ethics blog PEA Soup has initiated a series of discussions on Cross-Cultural Normative Philosophy; details on the series, including planned future installments, are here.

The first discussion, already underway, is of Richard Kim’s “Human Nature and Moral Sprouts: Mencius on the Pollyanna Problem.” Access to the paper and discussion is here.

Thanks to Brad Cokelet for spearheading this initiative!

Roberts, “Why Confucius Rubs America the Wrong Way”

Moss Roberts has published an opinion piece in the Asia Times entitled “Why Confucius Rubs America the Wrong Way.” Roberts begins:

The campaign to eliminate the Confucius Institutes from American education marks a level of ideological insecurity that has characterized this country for a long time. Willful ignorance about China has been an important part of that insecurity. The mission of the institutes is not ambitious; it is mainly devoted to offering Chinese language courses in colleges that lack them or have fledgling programs. As for Confucius himself, in America, interest in his thinking has never been strong; in China relatively greater attention is given to American thinkers and writers.

Job opening at Occidental College

Occidental College is hiring a tenure-track assistant professor to begin Fall 2020. The successful candidate will have the demonstrated expertise to teach courses and mentor students in the thought of figures from, or historical texts by, members of groups that are underrepresented in academic philosophy. A full description of the position and instructions for applying are included in our PhilJobs ad linked here. Further information about the College and our department can be found here.

APA Committee seeks your input

Are you a scholar of one or more Asian philosophy?  Are you interested in giving lectures, participating in conferences, contributing articles/book chapters/book reviews, or having your books reviewed?  Are you willing to help other philosophers integrate Asian philosophies into their teaching and research?  If you answer yes to any of these questions, the APA Committee on Asian and Asian-American Philosophers and Philosophies wants to hear from you!

Please click link below to fill out a short Google forms survey.  It should only take a minute or two and your information will not be shared beyond those working on APA initiatives.

APA List of Scholars of Asian Philosophies: https://forms.gle/5Rqwo868mF1WL78aA

If you have comments or questions feel free to email Brad Cokelet at bradcokelet[at]ku.edu

Vol 32 of The Journal of Confucian Philosophy and Culture (JCPC)

The editors are delighted to announce the publication of Volume 32 of The Journal of Confucian Philosophy and Culture (JCPC), the inaugural issue of the revised format of the journal. JCPC is published biannually (in February and August) and welcomes contributions of both articles and book reviews by qualified authors from around the world. This attached file contains the front matter, including a complete table of contents, of Volume 32. The complete volume will be available on line, within the week at our web site: http://jcpc.skku.edu/.

Ivanhoe Lecture at HKBU on Interpretive Strategies

HKBU Arts Does Method Colloquium Series

Title: Interpretive Strategies: The Case of Classical Chinese Texts

Speaker :     Philip J. Ivanhoe (Distinguished Chair Professor, Sungkyunkwan University)

Date :     20 September 2019 (Fri)

Time :       2:00 – 4:00pm

Venue :     University Chapel(大學禮拜堂), Ho Sin Hang Campus, Hong Kong Baptist University

Further details can be found at:  https://hkbuhk.ca1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_9mhn3A1sGcwEveR

New Book: O’Dwyer, Confucianism’s Prospects


SUNY Press has published Shaun O’Dwyer, Confucianism’s Prospects: A Reassessment. SUNY’s website is here.

The publisher’s blurb: In Confucianism’s Prospects, Shaun O’Dwyer offers a rare critical engagement with English-language scholarship on Confucianism. Against the background of historical and sociological research into the rapid modernization of East Asian societies, O’Dwyer reviews several key Confucian ethical ideas and proposals for East Asian alternatives to liberal democracy that have emerged from this scholarship. He also puts the following question to Confucian scholars: what prospects do those ideas and proposals have in East Asian societies in which liberal democracy and pluralism are well established, and individualization and declining fertility are impacting deeply upon family life? In making his case, O’Dwyer draws upon the neglected work of Japanese philosophers and intellectuals who were witnesses to Japan’s pioneering East Asian modernization and protagonists in the rise and disastrous wartime fall of its own modernized Confucianism. He contests a sometimes Sinocentric and ahistorical conception of East Asian societies as “Confucian societies,” while also recognizing that Confucian traditions can contribute importantly to global philosophical dialogue and to civic and religious life.

CFP: ECNU International Graduate Philosophy Conference, Shanghai

The East China Normal University (ECNU) Graduate Philosophy Conference will take place on 7-9 November 2019 and will focus on  frontier themes present in philosophies of the world in light of our ever-increasingly globalized context. Keynote speakers will include Roger T. Ames (Peking University) and Paul J. D’Ambrosio (ECNU). The title of the conference will be Theory (li 理) and Practice (shi 事) in Chinese and Western Traditions.

Applicants should prepare a presentation in English or Chinese approximately 20 minutes in length and submit to ecnuphilosophy@outlook.com before the deadline, September 23, along with the applicant’s name, nationality and the name of the university at which they are enrolled.

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