Author Archives: Nathan Kolodney

Two Upcoming ISCP Panels

Ann Pang-White, Executive Director of the ISCP, writes:

 Hope that you are enjoying the warmer early spring weather. ISCP is sponsoring two great panels at the American Philosophical Association-Pacific Division Meeting, April 5-10, 2021. On behalf of the executive committee, I would like to express our thanks to our APA-Pacific liaison, Dr. Joshua Mason (joshua.mason@lmu.edu), for his excellent work in organizing these two panels. The details of the panels, the registration page of the conference, and the link to the meeting program are as follows. The information will also be posted at ISCP website: https://iscp-online1.org/

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New Book: Harmony in Chinese Thought

Harmony in Chinese Thought: A Philosophical Introduction

edited by Chenyang Li, Sai Hang Kwok and Dascha Düring

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

Published: 03/2021

He (和), or harmony, has traditionally been a central concept in Chinese thought, and to this day continues to shape the way in which people in China and East Asia think about ethics and politics. Yet, there is no systematic and comprehensive introduction of harmony as has been variously articulated in different Chinese schools. This edited volume aims to fill this gap.”

To find more information on the book click here.

 

Bin Song Reviews Brown and McLeod at NDPR

Notre Dame Philosophical Review

2021.03.01 View this Review Online   View Other NDPR Reviews

Joshua R. Brown and Alexus McLeod, Transcendence and Non-Naturalism in Early Chinese Thought, Bloomsbury, 2021, 245pp., $115.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781350082533.

Reviewed by Bin Song, Washington College

To paraphrase Kant’s words on enlightenment, I propound that on the topic of transcendence and non-naturalism in Chinese and comparative philosophy, although we do not have a reckoned book yet, we finally have a book of reckoning. Joshua R. Brown and Alexus McLeod discern two major reasons why scholars assume there is no robust idea of transcendence, and hence, take naturalism as an inevitable lens for interpreting early Chinese thought: Firstly, some of these scholars would like to find in early Chinese thought something that is different from the West, mainly from Christianity. Secondly, some of them would like to find in early Chinese thought something that looks the same as the West, viz., the same as the scientific and analytic mindset prevalent in Western academia since early modern Europe.
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ICSAT Lecture Series on Early Chinese Classics

The International Center for the Study of Ancient Text Cultures (ICSAT) at Renmin University of China is dedicated to the study of ancient textuality in a global context. Since its founding in 2017, ICSAT has held annual international conferences, workshops, and seminars on various topics. During the Spring semester of 2021, due to COVID-19, these activities will be replaced by a sequence of four lecture series―each of eight individual lectures―on the textual culture of early China. The four distinguished speakers will present their latest research together with introductions to Sinological scholarship.
(See more details below)

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Sungmoon Kim at Seminar on Neo-Confucian Studies

The next session of the Columbia University Seminar on Neo-Confucian Studies will convene on Friday, March 5, from 7-8:30 pm EST, over Zoom. The speaker will be Professor Kim Sungmoon of the City University of Hong Kong. Prof. Kim’s title and abstract are below. The Zoom session can be accessed here. If you have questions, contact the new rapporteur at neb2134@columbia.edu any time.
(For more info see  below)

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NAPTS Bulletin: Confucianism and Tillich’s Protestant Principle

A paper by Lawrence Whitney about Paul Tillich’s “Protestant Principle” as it registers in Confucianism was published in the Bulletin of the North American Paul Tillich Society with responses by Bin Song and Heup Young Kim, and then Whitney’s response to the respondents. See here: https://www.academia.edu/45160997/Confucianism_and_Tillich_s_Protestant_Principle?source=swp_share

New Book: Asian Religious Responses to Darwinism

The following volume edited by Professor Mackenzie Brown concerns the interactions of Asian religious and philosophical traditions with evolutionary theories. 
Brown, Mackenzie (Ed). Asian Religious Responses to Darwinism—Evolutionary Theories in Middle Eastern, South Asian, and East Asian Cultural Contexts (Sophia Studies in Cross-cultural Philosophy of Traditions and Cultures). Cham: Springer, 2020.

Research project on the Sociology of modern Confucian philosophy

We would like to bring to your attention a research project on the Sociology of modern Confucian philosophy based at the Institute for European Global Studies of the University of Basel (Switzerland). The research group, one of the largest specialized in the study of modern Confucianism outside East Asia, seeks to provide new perspectives on modern Confucianism by deploying sociological approaches for philosophical aims. The group is composed of Ralph Weber, Philippe Major, Yim Fong Chan, and Milan Matthiesen. More information about the research project can be found at the following address: https://europa.unibas.ch/en/research/european-global-knowledge-production/the-exterior-of-philosophy/.

The research group would like to hear from researchers who share similar interests. Those interested in sharing their research or in finding more about the project are invited to write to Philippe Major at philippe.major@unibas.ch.