Category Archives: Conference

Wang Yangming Conference

On March 18-20, 2022, there will be a conference at Princeton on “Wang Yangming and Ming Thought,” organized by Harvey Lederman, PJ Ivanhoe, and Xueyin Snow Zhang. Details can be found at this website:

https://wangyangming.princeton.edu

Note that this will be in-person at Princeton, not on Zoom. Graduate students or early career researchers concerned about the expense of attending the conference might want to reach out to Harvey Lederman (hlederma@princeton.edu) for more information on possible available resources.

On-line Conference: “Textual Analysis as the Basis for Understanding Chinese Logical Thought”

The logic research centre of Tsinghua University warmly invites you to join us in attending the “Textual Analysis as the Basis for Understanding Chinese Logical Thought” international workshop.

Keynote speeches will be delivered by Jana S. Rošker, Christoph Harbsmeier, Yiu-ming Fung, Fenrong Liu, Dirk Meyer, and Joachim Gentz in order of presentation.

For the full program, please check our workshop website: http://tsinghualogic.net/JRC/?page_id=3876

The conference will be held online on January 15-17, 2022, 16:30-21:00PM (Beijing Standard Time).
       The conference will be held on Zoom platform (Meeting ID:894 1963 2234). Registration is required from here: http://tsinghualogic.net/JRC/?page_id=3878

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On-line Conference — Chinese Political Thought: A Global Dialogue beyond Orientalism

I am happy to share with you the final program of the workshop “Chinese Political Thought: A Global Dialogue beyond Orientalism”, organized by the University of Naples L’Orientale and Tallinn University in cooperation with Eurics, which will take place on Zoom on January 20-21, 2022.

If you wish to register as audience, please fill this form: https://forms.office.com/r/6U8YpGeyyR

FINAL PROGRAM (Central European Time), PDF version here: https://cutt.ly/7YMJBxf — and see below…

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Registration for ISEAP 2021 Conference (10-11 December, 2021)

The International Society for East Asian Philosophy (ISEAP) 2021 Conference will be held on 10-11 December, 2021 (Japan Time).
The conference program is now available at the following link:
https://iseap.jp/iseap-2021-conference/Also, the registration for ISEAP 2021 Conference (free of charge) is now open for audience participation.
The link for conference registration is as follows: https://forms.gle/vfe5MLyufrL1riCKA
The deadline will be 1 December, 2021 (Japan Time).

See the launch of the new website here: https://iseap.jp/

Update: Panels at the 2022 Eastern APA

The 2022 Eastern APA Conference will be taking place in early January, both in-person (on Jan. 5-7) and on-line (on Jan. 13-14 and Jan 18-19). The provisional program is available for download here. I have taken a read through and attempted to extract all the Chinese philosophy-related panels (plus those on Korean philosophy), which I paste below. If you notice any mistakes or omissions, please let me know!

Update as of Jan 2, 2022: these panels will now be fully on-line; two of the planned in-person Chinese philosophy panels have moved to on-line. The date and time of these two panels (in bold below) has now been set (see here), and I have edited the schedule accordingly. The two moved panels will now take place on Jan 18 and 19, respectively.

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AAR Confucian Traditions Panels

The AAR Conference is about to take place; here is information about the Confucian Traditions Group’s panels. Please note that you need to be registered for the conference in order to access the virtual panels.

Even if you are not going physically to San Antonio, you will be able to participate in this year’s Confucian Traditions Unit activities.  We are hosting three panels, and we encourage you to attend all three!  The information is down below.  The first session is in person, and the latter two are virtual.  We hope to see you there, at least on our computer screens.

In-person sessions begin with an A-prefix (i.e., A20-109), whereas Virtual sessions begin with an AV-prefix (i.e., AV21-115)

All Times are Listed in Central Standard Time (CST)

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2021 Res Philosophica Conference: Globalizing Empirically-Informed Philosophy (Nov 18-19)

The Res Philosophica Conference is hosted by the Department of Philosophy at Saint Louis University. The themes are chosen by members of the Department, and the papers from the conference are published in a special issue of the journal.

2021 Conference: Globalizing Empirically-Informed Philosophy

The 2021 Res Philosophica Conference, titled Globalizing Empirically-Informed Philosophy, is organized by Helen De Cruz and will be held online on November 18 and 19th, 2021. Participants include Julianne N. Chung, Alexis Elder, Bryce Huebner, Nicholaos Jones, Edouard Machery, Ryan Nichols and Hagop Sarkissian.

The aim of this conference is to bring together scholars working on the intersections between empirically-informed philosophy and lesser taught philosophical traditions. Empirically-informed philosophy includes both experimental philosophy (philosophers who use experiments to address philosophical questions) and philosophy that draws on results from the sciences, such as psychology, archaeology, or biology. There is a nascent interest on how empirical approaches might bear on philosophical questions outside of the western tradition. For example, to what extent are philosophical intuitions stable across cultures? How can we empirically investigate concepts from Confucian philosophy, such as li and ren? The aim of this conference is to explore how these questions might be approached, to identify future avenues for research, and to examine potentially how the intersection of empirical approaches and non-western philosophical traditions might enhance pedagogical goals as well.

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Online Workshop: “One-Many Relations in Chinese Philosophy” (Nov 6)

Workshop Description:

In the worldview of different traditions, we usually find paradoxical articulations of the one-many relations, such as “one is many”, “all in each”, “trinity”, “unity of heaven and the human”, and so on. What are the different strategies employed by different thinkers, especially those from the Chinese philosophical traditions, to account for the diversification of one or unification of many? What would be the foundation for contemplating the one-many relations? This workshop aims to investigate these questions as a basis for intercultural examination and dialogue with a focus on Chinese philosophy.

Zoom ID: 982 3676 8637
Passcode: 526715
Time: Nov 6, 2021
7pm (GMT +8) – Singapore, Hong Kong, and China time; 7am – US time; 12noon – UK time
For more details on the abstract and schedule, please see the official fb events page @ https://fb.me/e/4xX9Ugofe

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Justice Between Generations: Asian, African, Indigenous, and Western Perspectives

Justice Between Generations: Asian, African, Indigenous, and Western Perspectives

Wednesday, September 29, 2021 –Friday, October 1, 2021

Concordia University, Montreal

This three-day conference welcomes researchers to focus on intergenerational ethics through cross-cultural philosophical dialogue. Organized around the guiding theme of connections among the concepts of nature, time and responsibility and hosted by the Nature, Time, Responsibility Research Group based at Concordia. Presented virtually and open to all. For schedule and registration click here.

Tuesday, September 28, 2:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Workshop: 
Backs to the Future? Learn more and register here.

Tuesday, September 28, 3:30 to 5:30 p.m.
Opening Talk: Indigenous World View: Intergenerational Ethics and Heritage with Mona Polacca. Learn more and register here.

Times:

September 29, 1 – 6 p.m. EST
September 30, 9 a.m. – 6 p.m. EST
October 1, 9 a.m. – 6 p.m. EST

How can you participate? Register for the Zoom meeting.

Have questions? Send them to info.4@concordia.ca

Coffee Time Talks on Chinese Thought: Body and Mind in the Analects

Body and Mind in the Analects: Embodied Cognition, Digital Humanities, and the Project of Comparative Philosophy

This talk will explore how engaging with the cognitive sciences and digital humanities undermines claims such as this, and more broadly can help us to do our work as scholars of comparative philosophy.

Host: Professor Edward Slingerland, University of British Columbia

Date: Monday September 27, 2021 10:00-11:30am CST

Zoom link:https://slu.zoom.us/j/98495006071

Questions? Email pauline.lee@slu.edu

See full flyer here.