Category Archives: Conference

Call for Papers for Midwest Conference on Chinese Thought (Virtual)

16th Annual Midwest Conference on Chinese Thought
Wright State University
30 April-1 May 2021
The Midwest Conference on Chinese Thought was created to foster dialogue and interaction between scholars and students working on Chinese thought across different disciplines and through a variety of approaches. Submissions are invited for papers on any aspect of Chinese thought as well as papers dealing with comparative issues that engage Chinese perspectives.


This year’s conference will be held virtually on Friday, April 30 and Saturday, May 1 and hosted by Wright State University. Our keynote speaker will be Robin R. Wang, Professor of Philosophy at Loyola Marymount University.

Professor Wang will present “Dao of Rou 柔 (Suppleness): Proprioceptive Knowledge and Its Epistemological Value in Early Daoism”:

Through Chinese intellectual history, early Daoism, a Dao-based and inspired teaching and practice, has been considered the philosophy of rou 柔 (suppleness, pliant, yielding, softness), which the Daodejing couples with water, the infant, and the feminine. A popular Chinese binary expression of culture, gen 根 (root/foundation) and hun 魂 (soul/spirit), takes Dao as the root of Daoist teaching and rou as a spirit of Lao-Zhuang. However, rou has often been understood only as de (德) moral virtue or shu (术) strategy, something more practical than conceptual. This talk will respond to this theoretical gap and argue for rou as a form of proprioceptive awareness or bodily knowledge that shapes a cognitive style and an epistemological stance to guide our rational effort, illumination, and well-being. More importantly, this rou style of knowing embodies the epistemic value, such as intellectual humility, openness, receptivity and resilience, for a cognitive success.
Similar to previous conferences, we anticipate selecting 12-16 papers for presentation. For consideration submit a 1-page abstract to Judson Murray at judson.murray@wright.edu by January 31, 2021 for blind review. For more information, visit the conference website here.

Updates to ISCP Conference Deadlines

A message from the ISCP 22nd Conference Organizing Committee:

Due to the Covid-19 condition, we have decided to extend/postpone the various deadlines for the 2021 biennial international conference to a later date so as to give us more time to observe Covid-19 situation and to give everyone more time to prepare for their abstracts and papers. The new deadlines are as follows:

Deadline for submission of abstracts and panel proposals: February 28, 2021

Communication of acceptance: By March 31, 2021

Registration: Will begin on March 31, 2021.

*Deadline for early registration with member discount rate: May 31, 2021. After May 31, the non-discounted standard rate will apply.

Deadline for submission of full papers: May 31, 2021

Reservation for designated hotels (with conference rate): April 1- June 1, 2021

We will update ISCP website and the Conference website with the new information soon.

Critical Theory From and Beyond the Margins: Public Online Workshop

CRITICAL THEORY FROM AND BEYOND THE MARGINS

24 OCTOBER 2020, SATURDAY | 10:00 AM TO 6:00 PM (UTC +8)
ZOOM MEETING- ID: 976 4344 1616 | PASSCODE: 241
HTTPS://UMAC.ZOOM.US/J/97643441616?PWD=BTJYBLH5NMTNSDFFA2NML285WDJLUT0924

Critical theory is a Western, and distinctly European, intellectual tradition that drew its normative resources from the social and political events that transpired in Europe over the course of the 20th century. It is relevant to ask the question whether, as a critical-practical
tradition, critical theory has anything to contribute outside the Western-European context, given the emergence of globalization and the issues that arose with it. For some, the Eurocentrism of critical theory is symptomatic of its very own crisis, one which challenges the universality of its normative claims, e.g., the abolition of social injustice. Is it possible for critical theory to overcome its Eurocentrism and, therefore, its own crisis? The irony is that critical theory is only able to defend the universality of its normative claims when it is able to
renew itself. If it is at all possible to renew critical theory, what does this renewal entail? The workshop will pursue these questions by expanding the scope of traditional critical theory, especially, but not exclusively, by drawing on critical perspectives on modern societies and
emancipation movements that have originated in Asia.

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CFP: Association for Political Theory

The organizers tell me “We welcome papers in Chinese and comparative political philosophy and hope that we will receive many submissions from philosophers and theorists who work in these fields.”

2020 Association for Political Theory Call for Papers

Proposal Deadline: Monday, February 10, 2020

The Association for Political Theory Annual Conference (University of Massachusetts Amherst, November 12th-14th, 2020)

Program Committee Co-Chairs: Jennie Ikuta (University of Tulsa) andK ennan Ferguson (University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee)

The Association for Political Theory (APT) invites paper proposals for its annual conference to be held November 12th-14th, 2020, at the campus of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. We will consider papers on all topics in political theory, political philosophy and their cognate disciplines, from scholars working in any field at any institution. Any scholars who are ABD or who hold a terminal degree in their fields may apply; we also encourage faculty members to volunteer to serve as chairs and/or discussants.

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Conference at NCCU: Chinese Aesthetics and the Art of Landscape Painting

Kai Marchal of National Cheng-chih University and Michael Forster of Bonn University have organized a conference this week on “Chinese Aesthetics and the Art of Landscape Painting”; details are here. The organizers describe their goals as follows:

Traditional Chinese landscape painting is a paradigmatic genre of Chinese art. The “Chinese literati ideal” of artistic production is closely associated with the painting of mountains, rivers, trees, bamboo, pavilions and other elements of what we today simply call landscapes. We presume that the reconstruction of any aesthetic tradition and theory always requires actual aesthetic experience on the spot. Instead of merely discussing aesthetic theorems in a general and highly abstract way, we want to take the experience of actual Chinese landscape paintings as a starting point for further discussion. We thus hope to foster a dialogue between more conceptually driven approaches to Chinese art and more specialized, sinological ones.

CFP: The 4th Biennial Conference World Consortium for Research in Confucian Cultures

The Organizing Committee of the 4th biennial conference of the World Consortium for Research in Confucian Cultures gladly announces a call for papers.

Conference theme: “Gender, Family, and Global Confucianism”

Conference and Organizing and Program Committee:

Heisook Kim (Ewha Woman’s University), Roger T. Ames (PKU), Jeong Keun Shin (Sungkyunkwan University) (co-chairs)

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Confucian Traditions Unit, American Academy of Religion: Panels

The Confucian Traditions Unit invites you to attend the two sessions held by us at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Religion (November 23-26, 2019 San Diego, CA). On Saturday 9:00 to 11:30 AM, we will hold a session entitled “Animals, Real and Imagined, in Chinese Religions: Late Antique and Medieval Periods.” And on Sunday 1:00 to 3:00 PM, we will have a session on “Dragons, Mosquitos, and the Hundred Animals: Changing Conceptions of Animals in Pre-Modern China,” followed by a business meeting. You can find the titles of papers and names of presenters here at the bottom of this invitation.

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“Indian and Chinese Religions Compared” sessions at AAR

The Indian and Chinese Religions Compared unit is sponsoring three sessions at the American Academy of Religion this year: 

  • Mind and Consciousness: Indian and Chinese Approaches
  • Indigenous Theories of Ritual in India and China (co-sponsored with the Ritual Studies unit; note that the papers for this session are being pre-circulated)
  • Yogācāra and Vedānta in Modern Chinese and Indian Thought (co-sponsored with the Hinduism unit and the Yogācāra unit)  

For details, please see below. Abstracts for individual papers can be viewed online: 

<https://papers.aarweb.org/program_book?keys=indian+and+chinese+religions+compared&field_session_slot_nid=All>  Continue reading →

CFP: Stanford-Berkeley Graduate Student Conference on Pre-Modern Chinese Humanities

Time: April 17-18, 2020

Venue: Center for East Asian Studies, Stanford University

Proposals/bios due: November 25, 2019 (5:00 p.m. Pacific Standard Time)

Notification of acceptance by: January 16, 2020

Full papers due: March 10, 2020

Please download the event flyer here.

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