Category Archives: Chinese philosophy – 中國哲學 – 中国哲学

New Book: Archery Metaphor and Ritual in Early Confucian Texts

Rina Marie Camus’ new book, Archery Metaphor and Ritual in Early Confucian Texts, has been published by Rowman & Littlefield. A brief description about the book:

Archery Metaphor and Ritual in Early Confucian Texts explores the significance of archery as ritual practice and image source in classical Confucian texts. Archery was one of the six traditional arts of China, the foremost military skill, a tool for education, and above all, an important custom of the rulers and aristocrats of the early dynasties. Rina Marie Camus analyzes passages inspired by archery in the texts of the Analects, Mencius, and Xunzi in relation to the shifting social and historical conditions of the late Zhou dynasty, the troubled times of early followers of the ruist master Confucius. Camus posits that archery imagery is recurrent and touches on fundamental themes of literature; ritual archers in the Analects, sharp shooters in Mencius, and the fashioning of exquisite bows and arrows in Xunzi represent the gentleman, pursuit of ren, and self-cultivation. Furthermore, Camus argues that not only is archery an important Confucian metaphor, it also proves the cognitive value of literary metaphors—more than linguistic ornamentation, metaphoric utterances have features and resonances that disclose their speakers’ saliencies of thought.

For more information about the book, please click here!

New Book: Transcendence and Non-Naturalism in Early Chinese Thought

Alexus McLeod and Joshua R. Brown’s new book, Transcendence and Non-Naturalism in Early Chinese Thought, has been published by Bloomsbury!  A brief description:

Contemporary scholars of Chinese philosophy often presuppose that early China possessed a naturalistic worldview, devoid of any non-natural concepts, such as transcendence. Challenging this presupposition head-on, Joshua R. Brown and Alexus McLeod argue that non-naturalism and transcendence have a robust and significant place in early Chinese thought.

Click here for more information about the book.

Chris Fraser to move to Univ. of Toronto

I am happy to share this announcement from Martin Pickavé, Chair of the University of Toronto’s Department of Philosophy:

Chris Fraser (http://cjfraser.net), a well-known specialist in classical Chinese philosophy and comparative philosophy, who is currently Professor and Chair of the Department of Philosophy at the University of Hong Kong, will move to the University of Toronto in July 2021. At Toronto, Professor Fraser will be the Richard Charles & Esther Yewpick Lee Chair in Chinese Thought and Culture. His main appointment will be in the Department of Philosophy, but he will also hold a cross-appointment in East Asian Studies.

 

 

 

 

 

New Book: Canda, The Way of Humanity: Confucian Wisdom for an Opening World (Teachings of the Korean Philosopher, Haengchon)

Edward R. Canda’s new book, The Way of Humanity: Confucian Wisdom for an Opening World (Teachings of the Korean Philosopher, Haengchon), has been published by University of Kansas Libraries!  See here for more information.

Translation of Zhen Dexiu’s Xin Jing

Ryan Chiang McCarthy has published a translation of the 13th c. CE text Xinjing 心经. As he explains the text was:

…compiled by the Southern Song Dynasty politician and scholar Zhen Dexiu (1178-1235, art name Xishan). The Xinjing is an anthology of selected texts, from ancient classics such as the Yijing, the Liji, and the Mengzi, accompanied by comments by the Cheng brothers, Zhu Xi, and other eminent scholars, mostly of the Song period. Its theme, as the title suggests, is the matter of cultivating the heart, or mind.

Please see here. Congratulations, Ryan!

Book Panel: Zhuoyao Li’s Political Liberalism, Confucianism, and the Future of Democracy in East Asia

City University of Hong Kong is hosting an online book panel on Zhuoyao (Peter) Li’s Political Liberalism, Confucianism, and the Future of Democracy in East Asia.

The book panel will be held on September 19, 2020 from 9:00am-12:00pm (HKT) via Zoom.  Registration is required to attend this event. Please email flmang@cityu.edu.hk to register for this event.

For more information about this book panel, please click here.

Book Panel: Shaun O’Dwyer’s Confucianism’s Prospects

City University of Hong Kong is hosting an online book panel on Shaun O’Dwyer’s Confucianism’s Prospects: A Reassessment.

The book panel will be held on September 12, 2020 from 9:00am-12:00pm (HKT) via Zoom.  Registration is required to attend this event. Please email flmang@cityu.edu.hk to register for this event.

For more information about this book panel, please click here.