Category Archives: Chinese philosophy – 中國哲學 – 中国哲学

Lecture: Li, The relationship between Neo-Confucianism and Buddhism

The Glorisun Global Network for Buddhist Studies is pleased to present:

The relationship between Neo-Confucianism and Buddhism in Song Dynasty taking Zhu Xi as an example

By Professor Li Chunying 李春穎, International Confucian Academy at China University of Political Science and Law

Date: Monday, December 6, 2021, 10:00 AM PST
Webpage: https://glorisunglobalnetwork.org/guest-lecture-li-chunying/
Registration: https://ubc.zoom.us/meeting/register/u5wrdOmoqzgvGN1Ua0TqENfP-XZayG8-nG12

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CFP: ISCP Conference

This is a reminder that the deadline for the individual paper abstract and panel proposal submission for the ISCP Shanghai conference in 2022 is December 31, 2021. Please send your abstracts or panel proposals to the Conference Organizing Committee at iscpecnu2021@sina.com.

Please see below regarding the hybrid platform of the Shanghai conference.

You can find more information about the conference at www.iscp-online1.org/conferences.

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Future of Cosmopolitanism Blog

P. J. Ivanhoe writes:

The U.S.-China Research Group on Cosmopolitanism consists of nine scholars from the United States and the Chinese cultural sphere who are pursuing a structured exploration of theoretical and practical problems related to cosmopolitanism. In particular, we are looking to draw upon Chinese philosophical traditions in order to explore alternative understandings of the nature and future of cosmopolitanism. As a first step, each member of the group has composed a short reflection describing her or his initial thoughts on the topic. These are presented in a blog at the bottom of our web page:

https://uschinadialogue.georgetown.edu/topics/research-group-cosmopolitanism

We offer these as points of departure for an ongoing conversation and invite comments and suggestions by anyone interested in this set of issues.

East China Normal University’s Skills-Based Approach to Chinese Philosophy

Paul J. D’Ambrosio, Dean of the Center for Intercultural Research and Associate Professor in Chinese Philosophy at East China Normal University, writes with some information on ECNU’s English-language graduate programs:

For almost a decade East China Normal University has run a highly successful graduate (M.A. and Ph.D.) program in Chinese philosophy taught in English. In recent years we have begun to implement a method of teaching Chinese philosophy that centers on the practice, or gongfu (“kung-fu”), of doing philosophy with classical texts. The gongfu or “skills-based” approach focuses on developing skills of close reading and interpretation in the original Chinese. We work together to understand, unpack, and explore the interpretive possibilities of specific passages within the context of the traditional works themselves. The core courses ask students to read aloud passages from the AnalectsLaoziMencius, and Zhuangzi in Chinese and then themselves lead investigative discussions of what those passages can mean. The professors guide discussion, helping correct misreadings and drawing on traditional and modern commentaries to elucidate which interpretations have historically proven most influential and (perhaps) why. While aiming to familiarize and inform, the emphasis in class lies on cultivating the skills essential to soundly analyzing the traditional texts.

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On-line Lecture: Jenco: The Ming-Qing Transition as a Philosophical Problem

Leigh Jenco: The Ming-Qing Transition as a Philosophical Problem

Time: Dec 3, 2021 04:00 PM (German time); register here.

Description: The transition from the Ming dynasty to the Qing dynasty was not experienced as a sharp break for those who lived through it, but it has come to stand in the minds of later Chinese literati as nothing less than an existential crisis for Chinese identity—both driving and driven by a shift in intellectual perspective that emerged in the early years of Qing consolidation. Many educated literati retrospectively blamed the fall of the Ming on the abstruse philosophizing that preoccupied followers of Wang Yangming, a sixteenth-century statesman, frontier general and philosopher whose rejection of state-sponsored Confucian orthodoxy rode a wave of interest in metaphysical speculation about the sources of moral knowledge. In its place—just as the government policy adapted from an inward-looking, Han-dominated state to a cosmopolitan, expansionist inner Asian empire—seventeenth- and eighteenth-century literati turned their attention to the historical and philological verification of classic texts, inaugurating the “evidential learning” (kaozheng) that twentieth-century Chinese reformers would see as proof of an indigenous, modern “scientific spirit.” In this paper I argue that such divisions obscure from view the extent to which the Manchu victory and the territorial consolidation that followed continued the strong parallels that marked both Chinese and European societies in early modernity. There are thus important philosophical consequences for periodizing the Chinese early modern period as an abrupt transition from “Ming to Qing” or “philosophy to philology”. I use my current research to offer examples of these consequences. Specifically, I argue that characterizing this time period in terms of a rupture between dynasties, rather than as a more general epoch of early modernity, leaves us unable to assess philosophically the ways in which ideas and practices thematized by scholars of Yangming learning enabled particular kinds of discourse about human difference to take shape.

New book: Philosophical Enactment and Bodily Cultivation in Early Daoism

Philosophical Enactment and Bodily Cultivation in Early Daoism: In the Matrix of the Daodejing

By Thomas Michael

Published: 9/9/21

Description: In Philosophical Enactment and Bodily Cultivation in Early Daoism, Thomas Michael illuminates the formative early history of the Daodejing and the social, political, religious, and philosophical trends that indelibly marked it.
This book centers on the matrix of the Daodejing that harbors a penetrating phenomenology of the Dao together with a rigorous system of bodily cultivation. It traces the historical journey of the text from its earliest oral circulations to its later transcriptions seen in a growing collection of ancient Chinese excavated manuscripts. It examines the ways in which Huang-Lao thinkers from the Han Dynasty transformed the original phenomenology of the Daodejing into a metaphysics that reconfigured its original matrix, and it explores the success of the Wei-Jin Daoist Ge Hong in bringing the matrix back into its original alignment.
This book is an important contribution to cross-cultural studies, bringing contemporary Chinese scholarship on Daoism into direct conversation with Western scholarship on Daoism. The book also concludes with a discussion of Martin Heidegger’s recognition of the position and value of the Daodejing for the future of comparative philosophy.

For more info on the book see here.

Registration for ISEAP 2021 Conference (10-11 December, 2021)

The International Society for East Asian Philosophy (ISEAP) 2021 Conference will be held on 10-11 December, 2021 (Japan Time).
The conference program is now available at the following link:
https://iseap.jp/iseap-2021-conference/Also, the registration for ISEAP 2021 Conference (free of charge) is now open for audience participation.
The link for conference registration is as follows: https://forms.gle/vfe5MLyufrL1riCKA
The deadline will be 1 December, 2021 (Japan Time).

See the launch of the new website here: https://iseap.jp/

New Book – Cosmic Coherence: A Cognitive Anthropology through Chinese Divination

Dr William Matthews recently announced the publication of his new book Cosmic Coherence: A Cognitive Anthropology Through Chinese Divination with Berghahn Books. The introduction can be read here.

Description:

Humans are unique in their ability to create systematic accounts of the world – theories based on guiding cosmological principles. This book is about the role of cognition in creating cosmologies, and explores this through the ethnography and history of Yijing divination in China. Diviners explain the cosmos in terms of a single substance, qi, unfolding across scales of increasing complexity to create natural phenomena and human experience. Combined with an understanding of human cognition, it shows how this conception of scale offers a new way for anthropologists and other social scientists to think about cosmology, comparison and cultural difference.

To recommend this book to your library, use this online form.