Author Archives: Manyul Im

University of Bridgeport

NECCT 2016 Schedule & Information

(This post will stay at the top for a few weeks so potential attendees can be reminded to pre-register by emailing Manyul Im.*)

Here are the program schedule and travel information for the 5th annual Northeast Conference on Chinese Thought, November 5-6, hosted this year by the University of Bridgeport.

*For the purposes of facilities and meal preparation, if you are not a presenter or chair in a session, please send a quick note to Manyul Im (manyulim@bridgeport.edu) if you are planning or likely to attend. There is no registration fee, however space is limited.

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Teaching Resources Editor Wanted

I’ve temporarily pulled the Teaching Resources page tab off the blog. It was sadly neglected and could use the touch of a motivated, volunteer page editor. If you feel such motivation welling up in your xin, please let me know (manyulim@bridgeport.edu). If more than one of you are interested, I might coordinate a collaboration. Send me a note with your background, experience, and any ideas you have for making the page useful for our readers.

New Book – Theories of Truth in Chinese Philosophy

TheoriesOfTruthAlexus McLeod’s new book Theories of Truth in Chinese Philosophy: A Comparative Approach has been released by Rowman and Littlefield International (part of the new “Critical Inquiries in Comparative Philosophy” series).  The book deals with contemporary debates surrounding truth in early Chinese thought, as well as investigates conceptions of truth in the early Chinese texts themselves, from the Warring States through Eastern Han period.  More information here: [http://www.rowmaninternational.com/books/theories-of-truth-in-chinese-philosophy].

Alexus is currently at Colorado State University but will be moving to the University of Connecticut starting in the Fall term of 2016.

Comments Policy – slightly revised

To all our valued readers and participants,

Stephen Angle and I would like to thank you, first of all, for your interest and contributions in making this site a successful clearinghouse for discussions as well as announcements about Chinese and Comparative philosophy. We would like to revisit and point out a slight revision to our comments policy, which is now:

As a policy and a courtesy to other participants, comment or discussion authors must identify themselves with their first and last names. Exceptions will be made by request only to one of the administrators. If the blog administrators are unable to contact and verify identity, entries will be removed.

Exceptions will be allowed, but as exceptions of course and not as a general rule for any particular participant. We think it is reasonable, for some types of discussion, that a participant who has something to risk in revealing his or her identity be allowed to comment anonymously. We only ask two things when this is the case: first, that such individuals contact us by email with a request and, second, that such individuals identify themselves with some form of description that wears the anonymity on its sleeve — e.g. “Anonymous Jobseeker” or something like that.

The policy is necessary in order to provide accountability in the normal instance for what our contributors write to or about each other. We hope that you understand and share the value of such accountability in what is, ideally, an open forum for exchange of ideas. Thank you.

Call for APA Central Participants

Fellow committee member, Leah Kalmanson, is looking for respondents for an Author Meets Readers panel for the Central APA meetings in Chicago in March. Please contact her directly if you are interested. Find her contact info below.

The APA’s Committee on Asian and Asian-American Philosophers and Philosophies (CAAAPP) will be hosting an author-meets-reader panel at the next meeting of the APA Central Division (Chicago, March 2-5) for Peter K. J. Park’s recent book Africa, Asia, and the History of Philosophy: Racism in the Formation of the Philosophical Canon. Prof. Park’s work has already generated some conversation here at Warp, Weft, and Way. We are currently looking for respondents to serve on the panel. If you would be interested in attending the next Central meeting and serving as a respondent on our author-meets-reader panel, please contact Leah Kalmanson at kalmanson@gmail.com.

 

WuWei Revisited

Scott Barnwell revisits one of our favorite topics:

Off and on over the past 18 months I’ve been working on a new essay for my blog series “Classical Daoism – Is There Really Such a Thing?” The essay is on Wuwei 無為 and whether it could be considered a defining feature of a group or tradition we call (early) Daoism. I’ve got some thoughts I hope some may feel like addressing. As far as I can tell, wuwei does not have just one meaning or usage. I think there are a few different uses and would like to know if others would differentiate them as I do.

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New Email Subscription Option

For those of you who may have been unceremoniously dropped from your email subscriptions (to new post notifications) when our site underwent a “routine” update a couple of months ago, we have added a different — and more convenient, by Postmatic’s own advertising — subscription service from  on the far right menu.

One of the new features that I haven’t tested yet is the ability to comment directly from the email in which the post is sent. I guess we will find out soon enough.

Sign up if you like emailed updates!