Author Archives: Manyul Im

University of Bridgeport

Comments Policy – slightly revised

To all our valued readers and participants,

Stephen Angle and I would like to thank you, first of all, for your interest and contributions in making this site a successful clearinghouse for discussions as well as announcements about Chinese and Comparative philosophy. We would like to revisit and point out a slight revision to our comments policy, which is now:

As a policy and a courtesy to other participants, comment or discussion authors must identify themselves with their first and last names. Exceptions will be made by request only to one of the administrators. If the blog administrators are unable to contact and verify identity, entries will be removed.

Exceptions will be allowed, but as exceptions of course and not as a general rule for any particular participant. We think it is reasonable, for some types of discussion, that a participant who has something to risk in revealing his or her identity be allowed to comment anonymously. We only ask two things when this is the case: first, that such individuals contact us by email with a request and, second, that such individuals identify themselves with some form of description that wears the anonymity on its sleeve — e.g. “Anonymous Jobseeker” or something like that.

The policy is necessary in order to provide accountability in the normal instance for what our contributors write to or about each other. We hope that you understand and share the value of such accountability in what is, ideally, an open forum for exchange of ideas. Thank you.

Call for APA Central Participants

Fellow committee member, Leah Kalmanson, is looking for respondents for an Author Meets Readers panel for the Central APA meetings in Chicago in March. Please contact her directly if you are interested. Find her contact info below.

The APA’s Committee on Asian and Asian-American Philosophers and Philosophies (CAAAPP) will be hosting an author-meets-reader panel at the next meeting of the APA Central Division (Chicago, March 2-5) for Peter K. J. Park’s recent book Africa, Asia, and the History of Philosophy: Racism in the Formation of the Philosophical Canon. Prof. Park’s work has already generated some conversation here at Warp, Weft, and Way. We are currently looking for respondents to serve on the panel. If you would be interested in attending the next Central meeting and serving as a respondent on our author-meets-reader panel, please contact Leah Kalmanson at kalmanson@gmail.com.

 

WuWei Revisited

Scott Barnwell revisits one of our favorite topics:

Off and on over the past 18 months I’ve been working on a new essay for my blog series “Classical Daoism – Is There Really Such a Thing?” The essay is on Wuwei 無為 and whether it could be considered a defining feature of a group or tradition we call (early) Daoism. I’ve got some thoughts I hope some may feel like addressing. As far as I can tell, wuwei does not have just one meaning or usage. I think there are a few different uses and would like to know if others would differentiate them as I do.

Continue reading →

New Email Subscription Option

For those of you who may have been unceremoniously dropped from your email subscriptions (to new post notifications) when our site underwent a “routine” update a couple of months ago, we have added a different — and more convenient, by Postmatic’s own advertising — subscription service from  on the far right menu.

One of the new features that I haven’t tested yet is the ability to comment directly from the email in which the post is sent. I guess we will find out soon enough.

Sign up if you like emailed updates!

Important Facebook Detail

IMPORTANT: If you rely on Facebook to notify you of posts on Warp Weft and Way and you have “liked” it already, because of the updated format of the page, you will need to go to the page and select “Get Notifications” where it indicates that you already have “Liked” the Facebook page (look on the big picture of the ox). Remarkably, for Facebook, liking the page does not automatically sign you up for receiving notifications from the page.

Facebook Page Update

Just a quick update about the Facebook page that is associated with the blog. The page has been converted (finally) to a public page rather than being a “personal” profile page. That increases its functionality for being linked automatically to the blog’s posts. Discussions can also be started on the Facebook page by anyone who wishes to post there. Posts are moderated — they have to be approved by an administrator before appearing.

Note: some of you who were following the Facebook page were dropped off the list in the transition. Please “like” the page again to resume following. Cheers.

Major Update to Chinese Text Project

News from Donald Sturgeon, who has used optical character recognition to provide extraordinary searchable access to pre-modern Chinese texts online:

Chinese Text Project: over ten million pages of pre-modern Chinese texts now searchable online

A major update to the site has been made by applying OCR to over ten million pages of transmitted texts stored in the Library, linking scanned texts where possible to digital editions that follow them. Over 3000 existing texts have been successfully linked, allowing side-by-side display and textual searching of scanned texts.

Additionally, around ten thousand new texts and editions have also been transcribed for the first time using OCR. While these transcriptions inevitably contain many errors, they make it possible for the first time to search the scanned texts and immediately locate information within them. All newly transcribed texts have been added to the Wiki – please help by correcting errors when using these resources.

For further details, please see the OCR instructions.