Category Archives: Chinese philosophy – 中國哲學 – 中国哲学

Greater China Summer Workshop Program in Chinese Studies

The Sinological Development Charitable Foundation (SDCF) is inviting to join our 2021 Summer Program that will take place from 16th July to 14th August 2021.

 

This years schedule can be consulted here:

http://sinological.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/2021-Program-only.pdf

Application form and other information:

http://sinological.org/?page_id=113

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ToC: Dao. Volume 20, Issue 2

CFP: ACPA group session at the 2022 Eastern APA

Tentative schedule: Montreal, Quebec, January 5 – 8, 2022*
Submission deadline:  June 20, 2021
We welcome scholars to submit proposals for individual papers to be considered for inclusion on a single ACPA group session at the 2022 APA Eastern Division Meeting.   (Please note:  The APA now limits groups such as ACPA to a maximum of two total sessions at APA meetings.  Because the ACPA sponsors a “Dao Best Essay Award” session at the Eastern APA every year, with the participants invited by Professor Yong HUANG and the editorial board of Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy, we will only be able to sponsor a single additional ACPA group session for Eastern APA.  Thus, we are inviting only proposals for individual paper presentations, not proposals for a complete panel session.)
– We are open to submissions that engage with Chinese philosophy in a wide variety of ways and we are not specifying a theme for the group session prior to receiving proposals.
– In addition to the quality of submission, the selection of papers for presentation will be based on how well they can be worked into a good session.
– We particularly encourage junior, women, BIPOC, and other underrepresented scholars to apply.
– Information on the Association of Chinese Philosophers in North America (ACPA) is available here:  http://chinesephilosophersacpa.weebly.com
(*A note from APA regarding Meeting 2022: 
 Note: The next Eastern Division meeting will be held in person in early January 2022. . . 
Because of complications resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, we do not yet have a confirmed location or dates for the meeting. We hope to have such information soon, . . .) 
(To view paper guidelines and for info on abstract submissions see below)

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ToC: APA Newsletter on Asian and Asian American Philosophers and Philosophies

Special Issue on Buddhist Philosophy: Book Symposium on Why I Am Not a Buddhist by Evan Thompson
From the Editors
“Editors’ Introduction: Buddhist Modernism and Its Discontents,” A. Minh Nguyen and Yarran Hominh
Articles
“Précis of Why I Am Not a Buddhist,” Evan Thompson
“On Pursuing the Dialogue Between Buddhism and Science in Ways That Distort Neither,” Christian Coseru
“On Being a Good Friend to Buddhist Philosophy,” Bronwyn Finnegan
“Buddhism after Buddhist Modernism: Comments on Evan Thompson’s Why I Am Not a Buddhist,” Jonardon Ganeri
“Throwing Out the Buddha with the Offering Water: Comments on Evan Thompson’s Why I Am Not a Buddhist,” Jay L. Garfield
“Free to Be You and Me: Cosmopolitanism, Pluralism, and Buddhist Modernism,” Laura P. Guerrero
“Some Questions for Friends of Buddhism,” Sonam Kachru
“Thompson Is Not a Buddhist, But What about the Rest of Us?,” Constance Kassor
“Deconstructing Buddhist Modernism Without Postmodern Orientalism?,” Abraham Velez de Cea
“Buddhist Modernism: Let’s Be Suspicious But Not Because It Lacks Faith,” Louise Williams
“Replies to Critics,” Evan Thompson

Click here for the full text of these essays and more information

International Conference on “Nothingness in Deliberation”

We are pleased to announce the Routledge International Conference on “Nothingness in Deliberation” which will be held virtually at 19:00 PM to 22:00 PM (Beijing Time), May 22nd, July 10th, and July 17th, 2021.
Due to the pandemic across the world, we will have a virtual (on-line) conference. Should you wish to join the conference, please email to the conference coordinators to get the meeting password. We are going to use Tencent Voov Meeting, and any video recording of this meeting is prohibited.
HUA Xiaoya: 1335888231@qq.com

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CFP: ISCP at the 2022 APA Eastern (January 5-8 in Montreal, Quebec)

The International Society for Chinese Philosophy (ISCP) plans to host two-panel sessions at the Eastern Division American Philosophical Association (APA) in Montreal, Quebec, on January 5–8, 2022.

Submissions focusing on any area of Chinese or Comparative philosophy are welcomed. Your submission should include the following information:

1. Title of Paper
2. Name of Presenter
3. Presenter’s Affiliation
4. Presenter’s e-mail address
5. Approximately a 200-300 word Paper Abstract
6. Submission Deadline: June 20, 2021

Please send the submissions electronically to Dr. Jea Sophia Oh, ISCP Liaison to the APA Eastern Division Meeting, at: joh@wcupa.edu with “ISCP APA Eastern” in the subject line.

Simultaneous submissions (e.g. submitting the same abstract to multiple APA Group Sessions) are discouraged. If your paper is selected for inclusion, then you are committed to presenting it at our Group Session of the APA Eastern Division Meeting.

on behalf of A/Prof Jea Oh, West Chester University of Pennsylvania & the ISCP

CFP: Teaching Philosophy as a Way of Life

Jane Drexler and Ryan Johnson are co-editing a special issue of American Association of Philosophy Teachers Studies in Pedagogy focused on philosophy as a way of life, and are looking for contributions, including those with an emphasis on non-Western philosophies. See here for more information.

Connolly Reviews Kim, Theorizing Confucian Virtue Politics

NDPR Sungmoon Kim Theorizing Confucian Virtue Politics: The Political Philosophy of Mencius and Xunzi (Reviewed by Tim Connolly, East Stroudsburg University)

“Confucian political theory offers a normative vision for contemporary societies that draws on concepts from thinkers in the Chinese philosophical tradition initiated by Confucius (551-479 BCE). Much of the recent work in this area is motivated by dialogue with mainstream Western political theory, focusing on questions of Confucianism’s compatibility with liberal democracy. Yet as Sungmoon Kim writes in the opening pages of the book, these attempts to establish dialogue have tended to look at general characteristics of the classical Confucian tradition, giving less attention to internal debates and disagreements within this tradition. Kim’s book is devoted to a reconstruction of…”

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