Category Archives: Confucianism

Article of Interest: “Indeterminate self: Subjectivity, body and politics in Zhuangzi” by Peng Yu

Yu, Peng. “Indeterminate Self: Subjectivity, Body and Politics in Zhuangzi.” Philosophy & Social Criticism, (January 2019). doi:10.1177/0191453718820900.

To see the full article please click here.

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Journal of Confucian Philosophy and Culture (JCPC): New Website

The Journal of Confucian Philosophy and Culture (JCPC) is a peer-reviewed international journal published by the Institute of Confucian Philosophy and Culture, Sungkyunkwan University. It is the only English language journal dedicated exclusively to research concerning the history and contemporary relevance of Confucianism.

It was first published in 2001 for the purpose of interpreting and exploring Confucianism from a modern perspective. From 2007 it sought to integrate broader academic dialogue by publishing articles in Chinese and English. From August 2019, JCPC will strengthen its international network and broaden its global presence by concentrating on articles written in English.

JCPC (ISSN 1598-267X) is published biannually (in February and August) and welcomes the
contribution of both articles and book reviews. Please visit our web page at: http://jcpc.skku.edu/.

March 1st Columbia University Seminar on Neo-Confucian Studies

The next session of the Columbia University Seminar on Neo-Confucian Studies will convene on March 1st, from 3:30 to 5:30 pm in the main board room of the Heyman Center for the Humanities at Columbia University. The speaker will be Jennifer Eichman, who will be presenting a paper entitled “Refreshingly Experimental: Crafting Confucian Arguments with a Buddhist Lexicon.”

Please contact Zach Berge-Becker <zsb2109@columbia.edu>, Rapporteur for the Seminar on Neo-Confucian Studies, if you would like to attend the seminar and thus receive a copy of the paper, which is a work in progress and is not to be further distributed or copied without permission of the author.

Book Reviews by Bin Song

Bin Song (Washington College) has recently published reviews of two books:

Paul Tillich and Asian Religions. Edited by Keith CHAN Ka-fu and William NG Yau-nang (Boston: De Gruyter, 2017). “Asian Religions” here mainly refer to Buddhism and Confucianism. The review is published by the Journal of Interreligious Studies, and can be accessed through here.

Confucianisms for a Changing World Cultural Order. Edited by Roger T. Ames, Peter D. Hershock (Honolulu, HI: University of Hawaii Press, 2017). The review is published by “Reading Religion” in the American Academy of Religion, which you can find here.

CFP: Taiwanese Philosophy and the Preservation of Confucian Tradition

Call for papers: Taiwanese Philosophy and the Preservation of Confucian Tradition

International Conference organized by University of Ljubljana, EARL Ljubljana, and TRCCS (Taiwan Research Center for Chinese Studies) in Taipei

10-12 October 2019

Description:

Although the philosophical currents in modern and contemporary Taiwan belong to the most influential and important streams of thought in contemporary East Asian theory, they are still unrecognized as specifically Taiwanese. The main reasons for the immense importance of Taiwanese philosophy for East Asia and the contemporary world are twofold. First, they can be found in its contributions to the preservation of traditional Chinese, especially Confucian thought. Secondly, its development of specific innovative philosophical approaches and systems profoundly influenced the theoretical discourses in the entire East Asian region. The philosophical currents in modern Taiwan were mainly developed during the second half of 20th century, in which the philosophical theory in mainland China was largely limited to the Sinization of Marxist thought. Hence, for many decades, Taiwanese philosophy represented the only driving force of developing, modernizing and upgrading traditional Chinese thought and its syntheses with Western thought. Hence, they soon also gained a wide spread popularity in most of the other East Asian societies that were traditionally influenced by classical Confucian thought, as for example Japan and South Korea.

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CFP: Women as Exemplary Persons 女君子 in the Ru (Confucian) Tradition

Call For Papers: “Women as Exemplary Persons 女君子 in the Ru (Confucian) Tradition”

Washington, D.C. March 8-10th, 2019

(Link to Conference Poster)

Keynotes:

  • Ann A. Pang-White (University of Scranton)
  • Anna Sun (Kenyon College)
  • Robert C. Neville (Boston University)

Confucianism is often criticized for being misogynistic and patriarchal in ways that go beyond similar critiques of other intellectual traditions by implying that Confucianism is inconceivable apart from these elements. Two more recent works begin to challenge this way of thinking by drawing on nuances and elaborating the contexts of traditional Confucian teachings on women: Ann A. Pang-White’s translation of The Confucian Four Books for Women (2018) and Robert C. Neville’s “Confucianism and the Feminist Revolution: Ritual Definition and the Social Construction of Gender Roles” in The Good is One, Its Manifestations Many (2016). Also, Anna Sun’s sociological work in progress on women in the global revival of Confucianism is quite promising in indicating a very positive trajectory for women in the tradition.

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New website for Sungkyun Institute for Confucian Studies and East Asian Philosophy

The new Sungkyun Institute for Confucian Studies and East Asian Philosophy (SICEP) has just launched a preliminary version of its webpage. Modifications and updates will follow. Please visit and see how the institute paves a new path at Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU) with Philip J. Ivanhoe as its director.